Buck Bros woodplanes question

I`m mostly figuring on building my new woodworking plane collection (working collection) with stanley planes. Today at home depot I noticed a smoothing and scrub Buck plane for around $30.00. Two questions: 1.Are they as good as a Stanley? 2.Are the blades as good?
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snip Teej wrote:

1. NO 2. NO
And don't get the Great Neck ones from Lowe's or Ace either. Hit the yardsales, flea markets and antique stores. You want Stanley, Sargent, Millers Falls, Union or Fulton planes. The old Craftsman planes are also acceptable, I mean OLD. The planes shouldn't cost you more than about $25. Make sure the parts are all there, and that the mouths aren't chipped. do a google search on removing rust or write me for instructions.
Dave in Fairfax
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Teej wrote:

JUNK! They're not even as good as a modern-day Stanley, and that's pretty bad. Go to eBay and search for "Stanley Plane"; you'll get a ton of hits, and you should easily be able to snag a decent #4 or #5 for less than the $30 you'd spend on a new Buck Brothers "plane". You want something that was made prior to the 1960's; a pretty easy way to tell if this is true is to stay away from the planes that are blue or maroon in color.
If you really want to learn how to make good plane-buying decisions, the following websites will be of great value:
http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan0.htm http://www.tooltrip.com/tooltrip8/stanley/stan-bpl/bailey-types.htm
If you actually want to USE the planes, the Bailey types 9 through 19 have all the best features. The "low-knob" type 10's and 11's are probably the most sought-after. If you want a "high-knob" plane, look for a type 14 or later because the knobs on the 12's and 13's were prone to breakage.
One more warning; you're sticking your toe in dangerous waters, my friend. The acquisition of hand planes is a seriously addicting affliction!
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The quality is pretty low. I have a couple of them. They can be made to work and work well though it takes a lot more tuning than you probably want to do being a beginner at it. After tuning, they work as well as my old Stanley's but they were a lot more work. the best deal going is ebay. There are lots of planes on there that can be had for very little and the majority of work that you have to do to these is removing crud and sharpening compared to the metal work you would have to do with the Buck.

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When I was new to woodworking I read a few articles on the subject. They usually suggested that the user get back to the "art of woodworking" through the use of hand tools. I set off to the local home despot and purchased buck bros bench plane and block plane. A MISTAKE I found out through use, though a great learning experience. I searched and searched for the proper way of tuning these planes and have since, through hard time consuming work, made these good working planes. The sides and soles are flat and the blade was sharpened using the scary sharp method without the use of fancy jigs. Lessons learned. I have since been on a mission to getting Stanley pre-war time planes. I'm not a big fan of just collecting them but enjoy turning them into great users. I have accumulated the Stanley No. 3, 4, 5, 6, 9 1/2 & a slew of spoke shaves (recently acquired). All purchased for under $125 total (pre-shipping) on e-Bay. Yes, they needed some work, but after the buck bros., anything is easier. Depending on who you are talking to, some believe that nothing beats a "Hock" blade, I have yet to order and make my own judgment. I now use the buck bros for scrubbing, prior to smoothing with the Stanley's. I'm thinking of giving the buck bros planes to my brother as a gift. He too is new to the "art of woodworking."
Jack
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snipped-for-privacy@nycap.rr.com (Teej) wrote in message

Wow great advice. Thank You all. I made a text for referance.
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