Bradford Pear Tree

http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/7587930.htm
Real Email is: tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet
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wrote:

Interesting.
Do you have Leylandii in the USA ? (a cypress) We had a fad for these in the UK in the early '70s, owing to a famous TV gardener's fondness for them. Now they're regarded as an instant border dispute with a neighbour - fast growing, but they don't stop.
-- Klein bottle for rent. Apply within.
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On Mon, 29 Dec 2003 12:07:15 +0000, Andy Dingley

Haven't heard of it but that doesn't mean much.
Currently, my favorite exotic import is "Nigella Bites".
I'm told that this is a cooking show.
Haven't gotten 'round to noticing that part.
Real Email is: tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet Website: http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1
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They are available, but aren't winter hardy in my area. Catalogs pitch them as instant hedges.
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Tom Watson presents:

Yeah. I knew they were fragile in ice storms years ago, but we left our 3 in. Took out 1 this past year, 2 more coming out ASAP, but mainly because they overgrew a redwood deck and slowed the growth of a sweetgum and a maple. Redwood does not like staying wet ALL the time. Turns black with mold.
I've also got some hybrid (not Lombardy) poplars lining the drive. They're approaching 30' tall, but are sending sprouts all over the place. Those will have to come out, too, but there are far, far more of them. Chainsaw heaven.
Then I have to figure out how to kill the suckers.
Charlie Self
http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
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Tom Watson wrote:

Yeah, I hate those damn things. Other problems aside, they're they're nauseatingly boring. Little green ball of leaves on a stick. They look sort of pretty exactly twice a year.
I have dogwoods, redbuds, hawthorns, crab apples, lilacs, roses-of-sharon... There are plenty of good choices to plant under power lines without having to clutter up the landscape with those stupid things.
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Isn't that the truth! They split SO easily in bad weather or ice storms and do NOT look pretty ever-in my opinion. Well, maybe the fall when they can turn red. Ginko or even cypress is much prettier.
On Tue, 30 Dec 2003 21:47:52 -0500, Silvan

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