box joint testing

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Other than cost, is there a reason CA glue is unsuitable? I'd used it on wood (not as a joint glue) and it does bond pretty well. Depending on the CA glue, you could get 30-60 seconds of open time. (Some of the thick stuff really needs accelerator or clamping.)
Puckdropper
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On 12/21/2015 9:33 PM, Puckdropper wrote: ...

Historical "Crazy Glue" products are pretty brittle so don't do very well in shear. There are specifically-formulated cyanoacrylates for wood applications which pretty much perform as well as typical yellow wood glues...but other than the case for quick set-up times the cost is still pretty much the biggest case against it as a general purpose wood glue.
<http://www.titebond.com/instant_bond/InstantBond_ThinkFast.aspx <http://www.finehomebuilding.com/tools/departments/what-is-the-difference/pva-polyurethane-cyanoacrylate-glue.aspx
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That's what I was thinking of - don't woodturners commonly use CA glue to attach scraps of wood so they can hold their work on the lathe, expecting to just rap the scrap with a hammer to remove it when done? Because the CA glue is brittle and just breaks off when the scrap is hit.
John
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On 12/22/2015 2:48 PM, John McCoy wrote:

Traditionally, without a 3 or 4 jaw lathe chuck, a face plate was screwed to a piece of scrap, and brown paper from a paper bag was glued between the work and the scrap with standard wood glue. When done, you could tear the pieces apart with the paper ripping apart, not the wood. I made a ton of turnings doing this in the old days. Not sure paper bags are thick enough to do this today. I never had a bowl come off this way, wish I could say the same for the 4 jaw chuck...
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On 12/22/2015 1:48 PM, John McCoy wrote:

More for pen assembly and also used as a finish on lathe projects like pens.
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On 12/23/15 8:36 AM, Leon wrote:

I use it for trim corners, crown, etc. I also use hot glue but CA is a bit cleaner and sandable.
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On 12/23/2015 11:28 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

Ditto.
Keep a bottle of the thick CA in my trim/install toolbox, as CA glue is great for attaching trim pieces that have already been stained/finished.
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On 12/23/15 11:41 AM, Swingman wrote:

I've been trying out Nexabond. http://sirruschemistry.com/products/ Basically a CA glue with much longer open time-- minutes instead of seconds. The jury's still out as I haven't used it enough to form a valid opinion.
I did use it on some stairway handrail returns a few months back. I just glued with Nexabond, no trim screws or nails. It's on a friend/client's house and I asked him to be my guinea pig for the stuff. He's going to let me know if/when it ever fails and I'll come over and inspect/repair it for free.
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On 12/23/2015 11:28 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

Absolutely as do I. I was commenting more with the use with a lathe.
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On 12/23/15 2:14 PM, Leon wrote:

And I was just commenting. You know me. ;-p
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On 12/23/2015 11:49 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

Yeah and so was I. LOL Good on you!
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4ax.com:

Can't be done. Several groups have tested various joints in various ways over the years, and invariably come to the conclusion that there's too much variation in the wood used to resolve the difference between joints of similar strength. "Everything else being equal" just isn't going to exist with wood.
John
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On Sat, 19 Dec 2015 15:10:18 -0000 (UTC), John McCoy

Thanks for the info. I still wonder if there was a constant wide set of break points, on a certain day, with the same batch of wood, that some conclusion couldn't be made.
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says...

That's why statistics was invented, to deal with situations where there are multiple variables. Test 30 samples of each and calculate means and standard deviations and if there's a real difference it will likely show up.
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4ax.com:

Well, that's a different question. You could certainly group results together, accepting that within some range of measurement error a group is "the same", and then look for differences between groups.
As I recall, when Fine Woodworking did their test several years ago, all the machined mortise & tenon variations were effectively the same (regular M&T, floating tenon, wedged tenon, etc). All of them were significantly stronger than dowelmax, beadlock, dominoes, etc.
I also recall there there was a difference in the failures, with the M&T always breaking the tenon, and the beadlock, etc, breaking the mortise. There was discussion at the time as to the significance of that difference, but I don't recall any conclusions.
John
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On Sun, 20 Dec 2015 15:38:56 -0000 (UTC), John McCoy

John, thanks for the info, I'll keep it all in mind, best I can, and use the info as I am working, while using the best common sense I can muster.
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On 12/18/2015 11:21 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

I use pocket hole screws in 5 times more applications other than as pocket hole screws. It seems that pocket hole screws themselves are pretty darn good screws.
In another discussion the counter sink drill bits came up. I often use the Kreg drill bit to drill my countersink and pilot hole and then use pocket holes in those holes and then plug with conventional round plugs.
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On 12/18/15 1:22 PM, Leon wrote:

Ditto, ditto, ditto from me on everything you wrote.
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wrote:

Sounds like a great idea, I have both sizes of their pocket hole drill bits. And the smaller one sound good for certain things, and then you can make your own plugs in various styles. Good idea!
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On 12/18/2015 3:47 PM, OFWW wrote:

I have not used the small pocket hole bit yet. What diameter is that? The standard size is 3/8" so cutting your own plugs is not a problem.
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