Books and a new idea

First, I'm bouncing around an idea about a regional woodworkers' book, something of a combined style book, and area travelogue. It's unformed, or at least largely unformed, at the moment. I know pretty much where I want to go with it, but I've got some map studies to do, and then I'll need to check out the local mountain folk for ideas. My area, central Virginia, will be the axle for the wheel, but the wheel will NOT go east. Sorry, but I don't like cities any more. So we're starting with a flat tire, on one side, but a decent arch on the other, working up in Tennessee and maybe into my father's state, Kentucky, back down in the Carolinas and not too far west, Arkansas possibly, while sticking to the high ground. We might rise into the Nemahalen Highlands of Pennsy, too.
At this point I don't give a damn if the woodworkers featured are pros or amateurs. All that's essential is excellence, but please don't equate ornateness with excellence...think Shaker as well as fancy 18th century secretaries. Think luthiery, too. Guitars and fiddles and you name it if you can pluck it or scrape a bow across it. Do you do any of that, or do you know someone who does? Please let me know.
Keep in mind that this book could go belly-up at any time at this point. It's just an idea being researched, with tentative interest shown by a publisher. If it does go, in today's economy it could still go belly-up at any time. And if you supply information, please don't be impatient. From contract signing to book release can be a period of 18 months, often longer. Add in early research and you can bet on longer.
Finally, just on the off chance I've lost or misplaced or otherwise screwed up addresses from those who sent me photos and information about their shops for the new Creating Your Own Woodshop, please pass 'em along again: charlies @ charlieselfonline. You can also use the gmail address on this, if it's visible.
The woodshop book is due out the end of March, maybe a week or so earlier, and I want to be able to get off the free copies ASAP after that.
I've seen an advance copy, and, I must say, it turned out decently. Probably most of the thanks go to David Thiel and the crew at Popular Woodworking books. He pulled at it until I provided enough info--or all I had. I got some marvelous photos from people who were using their own cameras and skill, which I appreciate a great deal.
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That's Nemacolan Highlands, and I'm still not sure it's spelled right. Lovely area though, where Frank Lloyd Wright built Falling Water and Kentuck. Interesting buildings, but not ones I'd care to live in.
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wrote: snip
That's Nemacolan Highlands, and I'm still not sure it's spelled right. Lovely area though, where Frank Lloyd Wright built Falling Water and Kentuck. Interesting buildings, but not ones I'd care to live in. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The original owner of Falling Water called it Rising Mildew. Then there were the structural problems ...
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Yeah. I was there about six or seven years ago. They were in the midst of extensive rebuilding, from a new roof to much else. I looked at the windows, and figured the place would be lovely scene for growing icicles on one's nose during winter. Not only single pane, but steel framed set directly into the concrete.
Looks great, though, which was the point. I much preferred the house on Kentuck Knob, but still wouldn't have cared to live in it.
Start with the fact the Wright was what one guide called "height challenged" and someone my size is going to feel oppressed, at best. Ceilings and lintels are low, kitchens are tiny, closet space is almost non-existent and on.
I understand the structural problems came from the fact that his schooling as an architect might charitably be called incomplete.
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"Charlie Self" wrote

With the addition of the absent preposition, it is aptly named.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
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wrote:

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Yeah. I was there about six or seven years ago. They were in the midst of extensive rebuilding, from a new roof to much else. I looked at the windows, and figured the place would be lovely scene for growing icicles on one's nose during winter. Not only single pane, but steel framed set directly into the concrete.
Looks great, though, which was the point. I much preferred the house on Kentuck Knob, but still wouldn't have cared to live in it.
Start with the fact the Wright was what one guide called "height challenged" and someone my size is going to feel oppressed, at best. Ceilings and lintels are low, kitchens are tiny, closet space is almost non-existent and on.
I understand the structural problems came from the fact that his schooling as an architect might charitably be called incomplete.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Certainly on the properties of materials. I've heard that structural problems exist in pretty much everything he built. Nice to look at, but as you say, I wouldn't want to live in any of them
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Frank Lloyd Wright was a great visionary and ARTIST As for building practical and livable houses/structures, not so much. To be fair, he often built beyond the materials and technology of the times. But some things were just unforgivable, like not putting rebar into the concrete.
But his buildings were purty.
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Lee Michaels wrote:

A great architect will let his structural engineer do his job and trust him. If one wants to be an engineer, be an engineer, not an artist. Seems to me that letting the engineer worry about those things frees one up, creatively.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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wrote

FLW fought with his engineers.
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Yeah, but... those guys want you to actually have a plan and then stick to it. Intolerable.
-Kevin
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On Mon, 9 Feb 2009 08:34:13 -0800 (PST), Charlie Self

If you happpen through Southern Illinois, there is Whipple Creek Guitars in Pomona area. Of course this is along the wine trail.
Mark (sixoneeight) = 618
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Charlie Self wrote:
<snip>

Hi Charlie,
I look forward to reading your latest book.
Is there any advantage to you as to where the book is purchased?
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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Jack,
I think I do better if it's bought through some place like Barnes & Noble, Books-A-Million, etc., rather than through a club.
A quick addenda to my earlier post. I'll be glad to discuss the new book idea by email with anyone with ideas of his or her own, even if they're not up for being in the book.
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Charlie Self wrote:

Does that include Amazon?
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I believe so. Essentially, any more or less standard retail bookstore, which Amazon has become, even with its discounts. Book clubs pay me less, because they pay the publisher less. Of course, you'd pay less, too.
But back to the current subject: what might you guys like to see in a book on Appalachian woodworkers? The variety is astonishing, but some is quite primitive,though dough bowls and treenware can be useful and decorative as well.
Hey, I just found out that some of the basket weavers making "Appalachian" baskets are in Haiti. I wonder if they use U.S. ash, oak, willow, etc.? My wife's uncle will be glad to hear that. He's been doing baskets--and chair seats--for most of his 80+ years.
For those who may not know, check the site for Ferrum College, in Ferrum, VA. Franklin County is still mainly rural--it's also known as Virginia's Moonshine Capitol--and the Folk Life Festival at Ferrum, in October, is a great experience. My knees have made me miss it for the past five years, but if I don't get my replacements this year, I'll use a Rascal to get around. It's only 45 or so miles from here. Craftspeople at work, from splitting shakes with a froe and mallet to gouging out dough bowls from tulip poplar or other woods, to making baskets and a host of other activities. The food is pret' good, too, but you begin to founder, or at least I do, after a day of barbecue and funnel cakes.
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Charlie
Do a web search for Greenville Woodworkers Guild in Greenville SC. We have a number of excellent craftsmen.
Also look up the Folk Art Center on the Blue Ridge Parkway near Asheville NC and the web site for the Carolina Mountain Woodturners.
Russ
wrote:

I believe so. Essentially, any more or less standard retail bookstore, which Amazon has become, even with its discounts. Book clubs pay me less, because they pay the publisher less. Of course, you'd pay less, too.
But back to the current subject: what might you guys like to see in a book on Appalachian woodworkers? The variety is astonishing, but some is quite primitive,though dough bowls and treenware can be useful and decorative as well.
Hey, I just found out that some of the basket weavers making "Appalachian" baskets are in Haiti. I wonder if they use U.S. ash, oak, willow, etc.? My wife's uncle will be glad to hear that. He's been doing baskets--and chair seats--for most of his 80+ years.
For those who may not know, check the site for Ferrum College, in Ferrum, VA. Franklin County is still mainly rural--it's also known as Virginia's Moonshine Capitol--and the Folk Life Festival at Ferrum, in October, is a great experience. My knees have made me miss it for the past five years, but if I don't get my replacements this year, I'll use a Rascal to get around. It's only 45 or so miles from here. Craftspeople at work, from splitting shakes with a froe and mallet to gouging out dough bowls from tulip poplar or other woods, to making baskets and a host of other activities. The food is pret' good, too, but you begin to founder, or at least I do, after a day of barbecue and funnel cakes.
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Thanks, Russ. I'll check them out. Asheville is fairly close, too.
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Forgot to say that the Carolina Mountain Woodturners meet at the Folk Art Center. We usually have over 100 members at each meeting. They have their own web site so you can do a search for them.
Russ
wrote:

Thanks, Russ. I'll check them out. Asheville is fairly close, too.
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Nova wrote:

Good question!
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I'll look forward to both books!
Charlie Self wrote:

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