Sharkbite plumbing fittings - a bad idea?


I am wondering whether there are any reasons to NOT use Sharkbite push-fit plumbing fittings other than their relatively high cost?
Rather than sweat soldering, they seem like a really attractive and very fast way to install copper plumbing without use of a torch or solder. I am especially curious to know if they are holding up well, and are as good as they appear on paper.
Any opinions would be most appreciated.
Smarty
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Compared to sweated fittings they are bulky and expensive and ease of installation may range from not that much easier to a real PITA compared to sweating copper.
Jimmie
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On Fri, 15 Jan 2010 18:38:07 -0800 (PST), JIMMIE

Tell me a situation where a sharkbite is a PITA compared to sweating copper.
I only have 2 in my house in a spot where I didn't feel like sweating a couple of joints because they were hard to get to & surrounded by flammables. Haven't leaked yet- 3yrs or so.
They *are* expensive, they *are* bulky. But harder than sweating? I don't see it.
Jim
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Just didn't have room to fit them in as we both agree they are bulky. You must think sweating Cu pipe is more difficult than I do. Fact is I kind of enjoy doing it.
Jimmie
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On Sat, 16 Jan 2010 11:37:12 -0800 (PST), JIMMIE

Try doing it above and behind a roughly 8"X14" heating duct3 inches from a2X4 .The duct is4 inches from the concrete wall that the 2X4 wall framing is set against. The only possible options were a Sharkbite type connection or soft drawn copper tube - and the sharkbite was a lot easier and neater installation.
I don't mind sweating copper pipe either, when you can reach it, but it would have required dropping the entire forced air heating duct system and re-installing it - which would have required removing another whole wall as well.
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Your taking pleasure in sweating has nothing to do with the OP's question and is entirely besides the fact. Your opinion that

indicates you have never used them.
Sharkbite's are much faster than sweating, even if you're geared up to sweat and have a bunch to do. A Sharkbite fitting takes about as much time to install as cleaning a copper fitting joint. The ability to use a Sharkbite fitting on copper, PEX or PVC, coupled with their ease of installation, far outweighs the cost premium.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

Thanks to all for replies and comments. My conclusion from all of this is that they are apparently fast, easier to use, and in some situations vastly superior where combustibles or very tight work areas limit access. I also conclude that long term reliability is somewhat unproven but quite possibly very good. And no doubt they cost a lot more, but the labor savings may be substantial.
Again, thank you,
Smarty
--


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I used a Sharkbite fitting inside a wall when replacing a frost free outdoor spigot. It was a tight spot. A local plumber who replaced my boiler a few years ago recommended it as an easy and reliable solution for homeowner repairs.
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wrote:

They can make a plumbing job go fast. Sharkbite fittings are amazing. I used them during a water tank install and expansion tank a year ago and they never leaked.
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Smarty wrote:

The Sharkbite fittings are very much like the push lock air fittings that have been used for industrial pneumatic stuff for a long time, so I would expect the reliability is good as long as the O ring material was properly selected.
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I'd say that comparing air fittings and water fittings and concluding that because something works in one application it means it's OK for the other is a little like saying that an O ring that's good for a toilet is OK to use to seal the space shuttle fuel tanks. Until I see 20+ years of actual field use, I'd use them where really necessary, but not conclude they are a reliable solution to use everywhere.
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On Jan 16, 4:37am, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

We have used them on various camp units on Alaska's North Slope. These units are connected/disconnected twice a year for the drilling season. We are talking about 40ft Connex's that have been converted into sleeping/dining modules. The temps range from sometimes 70 F in the summer to well below -50 in the winter. These fittings are wonderful. After a couple three connects/disconnect cycles they need replaced, but for a home user they would be ideal. They can handle (if memory serves) around 200 psi and the hottest water your water heater can make.
Two thumbs up!!
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replying to Smarty, Dave S wrote: All the answers I read here are worthy - there are good reasons to sweat and to use push on's --- My comment for all is that I remodeled to remove a bar faucet in a family room 19 years ago, and closed the supply - hot and cold - with shark bite end caps -- no problem so far - pretty comfortable with them, and used them again 5 years ago in a bath remodel - still perfect. They've been around too long to be faulty without all of us DIYers not hearing about it.
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wrote:

They use o-rings to seal, correct? If so, what is the o-ring material?
--
croy

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On 1/10/2019 10:53 PM, croy wrote:

I read one concern that the elastomer used to make the O-ring might be degraded over the years by the chlorine in the city water.
I worry about building materials that might degrade over decades. I heard that copper pipes are good for about 60 years. Our well water is said to accelerate ageing but mine are 45 years old and still going. A next door neighbor had his copper replaced with PEX and after he moved the new owner found that all the connections were leaking and needed to be replaced. They probably were not Sharkbites as they are more expensive and I think they have been around for 18 years.
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On Friday, January 15, 2010 at 8:23:44 PM UTC-6, Smarty wrote:

I was wondering the same thing since the water-powered sump pump I just received came with one pre-installed.
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On 1/11/19 1:19 AM, Davej wrote:

One wonders how a sump pump is water-powered...
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wrote:

one example :
https://www.homehardware.ca/en/water-suction-pump-kit-with-hose/p/3125834
John T.
--- ---
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In alt.home.repair, on Fri, 11 Jan 2019 09:49:22 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

Sounds great
"1 gallon of water from a garden hose, pumps out 6 gallons of water"
Is that possible?
"Basepump uses 1 Gallon of City Water to remove 2 Gallons of Sump Water at an average of 90 lbs. PSI and 10 Feet Lift" Basepump has been around for 20 or more years and I think there were endorsements of it here, and it only claims 2 gallons, but that's with a 10 foot lift. Only the bottom of the swimming pool requires that Maybe???? when the pool is full and it only requires a 6" lift it could do 6 gallons on one gallon?
If it works at all since it has no price, no dimensions and no rating!
Here are better ads with price, a bit of dimensions, and this one has 3 reviews. About 35 dollars. https://express.google.com/u/0/product/913471221953376248_10402770955458022614_7472660?utm_source=google_shopping&utm_medium=tu_cu&utm_content=eid-lsjeuxoeqt,eid-tvmrowriao&gtim=CP_zmcP1vbOq3QEQ5uG88IXQz-W5ARjwlZELIgNVU0QooJWf4gUwlIzIAw&utm_campaignt72660&gclid=Cj0KCQiAmuHhBRD0ARIsAFWyPwiaMWaSe4zdCfroPl_BmON981H0nZn2qsCoF6tG8_YeFNRmrAzx5P4aAnsoEALw_wcB
One guy complained that it floated to the top, and turned over, so put a weight on it!
Another ad with fewer details says "You're shopping in 21216 For more accurate pricing and availability, please provide your zip code" That's NYC. Why does it think I'm in NYC, and why zone 16, which I've never heard of?
Without any hoses, $21 (Amazon.com product link shortened)0&hvadid7157107032&hvpos=1o3&hvnetw=g&hvrand066881228863232510&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy07929&hvtargid=pla-309607072236&psc=1

--
Micky


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wrote:

39.99 Canadian at the home hardware store 2Km down the road from me.

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