Book recommendations needed

A Christmas gift certificate is burning a hole in my pocket!
I was about to order Landis' _The Workbench Book_, which I have heard highly praised, and seen in the library. But I was intrigued by the description and Amazon reviews of The Workbench : A Complete Guide to Creating Your Perfect Bench -- by Lon Schleining. Anyone here seen both books and can give pros and cons of each?
Similarly, I was going to get Leonard Lee's Sharpening book, but see the new one from Tauton, authored by Lie-Nielsen. Anyone who has seen both and can offer a comparison?
--
Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

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The Landis book is pure inspiration. There was/were three books put out by Taunton in almost the same time frame, The Workbench Book, The Workshop Book (also by Landis) and The Toolbox Book by Tolpin that really belong in any tool junkie's LEEbrary.
Sorry, I don't know about the other.
UA100, who isn't much of a help other than to say that the money won't be wasted on the Landis book...
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wrote:
LEEbrary.
(sigh...but I mean this in a good way...)
Regards, Tom.
"People funny. Life a funny thing." Sonny Liston
Thomas J.Watson - Cabinetmaker (ret.) tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1
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LEE WARD. I figure that at any given minute of the day there's a library being built somewhere. You'd think we could convince at least one of them to pay tribute to the man.
sigh...
In a good way.
UA100
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I have the Scott Landis book "The Workbench Book", this gives four complete classic designs, total plans you can build from as well as a vast history of wood working benches, awesome book. I intend to buy the Schleining book but I cannot comment on it yet. I also have the Lee sharpening book which simply is an awesome wealth of info on it's subject, in every field of sharpening of every type of tool from chisels to plane blades to drill bits and kitchen knives, nothing about your lawnmower blade I don't think...but entirely worth buying. My suggestion, you have an Amazon gift certificate, just go to a major chain store like Borders and Barnes & noble where you can compare two books side by side.
Alex
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Mon, Dec 27, 2004, 1:27pm snipped-for-privacy@asbry.net (alexy) A Christmas gift certificate is burning a hole in my pocket! <snip>
Me, I wouldn't buy a book, simply on someone else's recommendation. Primarily, I very seldom buy any book, unless I have already thumbed thru it and know exactly what it contains. Secondary, I've found long ago, books recommended to me by other people, are seldom books I would buy on my own.
I'd go to a bookstore, find a copy, and look thru it, then decide. Or, go to the library, same - if they didn't have a copy, I'd check on them borrowing a copy.
Woodworking books are getting more expensive all the time. I'm finding that few of them have more than one or two projects that actually interest me. And, I've found I can usually find the one or two project plans somewhere else, cheaper, or even free. I've gone to B&N, and other bookstores, looked thru books priced at $35, with maybe one project that interests me - usually the plan is on the web, maybe even free, but at the most usually maybe $10 - so it would make sense to me to buy just the one plan, not a book, and "save" $25.
I have paid up to around $45 for a book. But, you can damn well bet it has a lot to interest me, and I'll be refering to it, on a regular basis. My personal (woodworking) library at one time was larger than my local library. About all of the books were bought from a used bookstore, at prices from $.50 to about $9 each, most somewhere in the middle. A lot of them are in almost as new condition - some of which were sold new at $35, and I bought for around $5 each.
My way of thinking is, one of the workbench books would be great. But, how many workbenches are you going to make? Same with a sharpeing book, once you learn how, how many times you go to be using it? Besides, Scarry Sharp is free.
Me, I think I'd get a book on making boxes, probably one of Doug Stowes.
JOAT People without "things" are just intelligent animals.
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On Tue, 28 Dec 2004 17:49:22 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

So you need all the books you can get. Even buying books brand-new, full-price is cheaper than mistakes in the benchmaking budget.
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Wed, Dec 29, 2004, 1:29am (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@codesmiths.com (AndyDingley) claims: So you need all the books you can get. Even buying books brand-new, full-price is cheaper than mistakes in the benchmaking budget.
Nah. You goes to your local library, borrows a copy of the pertinent book, copys the pertinent pages, if necessary, makes your workbench, and returns the book. So, you're out a couple of bucks for gas, instead of $$$ for a book you'll only use once. I can spare a few bucks much easier than I can maybe maybe $35, especially when the end results are the same.
Then you spends a few bucks more for gas, go to a decent used bookstore, and spends what was saved by not buying one new book, on several used books.
JOAT People without "things" are just intelligent animals.
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