Best laid plans... (Sketchup, AutoCAD and Stickley)

1. Carefully measure from pictures and take dims from old catalogs to develop plans for a stickley reproduction side table #2568 (kind of rare). Like this one
http://p2.la-img.com/429/14433/4560722_1_l.jpg
2. Create entire detailed model in Sketchup including every mortise, tenon and internal drawer supports.
3. Confident every construction and assembly detail has been addressed.
4. Transfer all parts to 2D drawings (by redrawing in AutoCAD) where I have best expertise.
5. Mill parts for 3 sets (6 tables) in Cherry.
6. Start test assembly of one table and build front frame (legs and drawers spreaders) as the first sub assembly.
7. During dry fit realize that mortises for lower trestle spreaders were detailed (drawn) on inner face of legs instead of back face of legs.
8. Lucky to realize can swap left and right legs and do some milling changes to top section and still pull it off.
9. Consider learing how to do good drafting in Sketchup so I can draft over actual 3D parts instead of redrawing in 2D.
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Works for me ....
Good save on the previous 8 points ... That's where it's at, in any event :)
--
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"SonomaProducts.com" wrote in message
1. Carefully measure from pictures and take dims from old catalogs to develop plans for a stickley reproduction side table #2568 (kind of rare). Like this one
http://p2.la-img.com/429/14433/4560722_1_l.jpg
2. Create entire detailed model in Sketchup including every mortise, tenon and internal drawer supports.
3. Confident every construction and assembly detail has been addressed.
4. Transfer all parts to 2D drawings (by redrawing in AutoCAD) where I have best expertise.
5. Mill parts for 3 sets (6 tables) in Cherry.
6. Start test assembly of one table and build front frame (legs and drawers spreaders) as the first sub assembly.
7. During dry fit realize that mortises for lower trestle spreaders were detailed (drawn) on inner face of legs instead of back face of legs.
8. Lucky to realize can swap left and right legs and do some milling changes to top section and still pull it off.
9. Consider learing how to do good drafting in Sketchup so I can draft over actual 3D parts instead of redrawing in 2D. ================================================================================================================ Unless Sketchup has changed since I last used it, you really can't do good drafting in it. If it will save to a SAT (ACIS), it can be imported into Autocad were you can generate 2D drawings directly from the model with no tracing or redrawing required. You could also do the 3D in Autocad. Not really recommended as Autocad sucks for 3D but it can be done. I use Turbocad. I do a 3D model including all joints drawer slides ect. I then generate 2D drawings all in in the same program. Keeping everything in a fully capable program avoids errors. Then, when I get to the shop, all I have to do is cut according to print and assemble.
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On Wednesday, August 8, 2012 12:28:00 PM UTC-7, CW wrote:

Yeah, if I had the patience to learn Inventor or SolidWorks I would be a lot better off. True 3D with real-time 2D views for drafting. I am in the CAD industry and can get all this stuff for free but don't spend too much time as a user anymore, except home at night drawing furniture.
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On 8/8/2012 2:28 PM, CW wrote:

=================================================================================================================
Apparently it has change drastically since you last used it. Goodbye AutoCAD. 2D drawings, to scale or actual size are stupid simple.
Seriously, especially for woodworking. Sketchup is so damn simple to use you wonder why the others are so damn hard by comparison. Click a single icon and you have the 2D view of choice, then simply print.
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On 8/8/2012 10:37 PM, Leon wrote:

And have been for over 30 years. I've used DesignCAD for at least that long!
That and an Epson FX-100 (which I lament it's passing) made hundreds of extremely accurate patterns over the decades.
Anybody have a working FX-100 they might part with?

Pass!
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Sketchup is so damn simple to use you wonder why the others are so damn hard by comparison. Click a single icon and you have the 2D view of choice, then simply print.
I have no problem getting a 2D view but detailing it with all the dimensions and annotations in a professional manner seems far beyond what I can do with it. Yes I can add a few linear dimensions here and there but no real control of how they look, scale, font size and type, which dims belong to which part (layers? views?) controlling unit precision, can it do angular and radial dimensions? Leader with annotation, etc., etc.
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SketchUp Pro.
--
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On 8/9/2012 10:24 AM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

by comparison. Click a single icon and you have the 2D view of choice, then simply print.

and annotations in a professional manner seems far beyond what I can do with it. Yes I can add a few linear dimensions here and there but no real control of how they look, scale, font size and type, which dims belong to which part (layers? views?) controlling unit precision, can it do angular and radial dimensions? Leader with annotation, etc., etc.

To change the dimension, font, size, arrow type and color got to Model Info, Dimensions.
Adjusting styles will allow you to generally change you line weight.
If you open the window "Entity Info" It will give you the layer of the dimensions.
Unit precision is controlled from Model Info, Units.
Radial as in diameter and radius? Yes
Angle, Yes. IIRC that might be a free plug-in.
Leader annotation? Yes.
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Finally got the hang of Sketchup and really like it. Somewhat annoying user interface but otherwise great design tool
Struggled with your problem for some time and came up with the following solution. I tried to use a 2D software package and redraw the project there but quickly ran into the problem of having to update the 2D drawing because of a change to the Skecthup project.
Start by creating a new directory for this project so all pertinent project files are grouped together.
1. Draw up the project including all its parts and components. As you draw, create layers that separate the components so you can work with them with out the entire projects components getting in the way.
2. Be creative with component names so you can experiment with the same component' look and construction without losing the original design. I use a one up number to allow similar components to have the same name i.e. "Right Hand Top Drawer 1" and so on.
3. When it comes time to actually build the project you have several options. Create new files for groups of components. doors, drawers, carcass, frames etc.
4. Then copy groups of components to the new file or files and work with them there. (Note that when you do this copy and paste all of the information about the component goes into the new file, name, layers, component materials etc)
5.Use the Camera Parallel Projection tool for better presentation then format the components by pulling it apart. Then drag and drop its parts so you can add dimensions to each part of the component. You may have to rotate parts to make them lie on the same plane. For complex parts you can have different views with separate set of dimensions.
After that just print the components out. I like use legal size paper as this gets me a larger print out.
The only draw back to my way of doing things is that if the component in the original drawing changes you need to update components file also. But you can copy the new component to the appropriate file.
I use a Sketchup plugin called Cut List that helps with the creation of cut lists. It generates a CVS file for importing into a spreadsheet program.
Just started construction on a shed addition to my garage I designed using Sketchup and so far it is going well.
Marty K. Vermont USA
On 8/8/2012 12:55 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

catalogs
to develop plans for a stickley reproduction side table #2568
(kind of rare). Like this one
http://p2.la-img.com/429/14433/4560722_1_l.jpg

mortise,
tenon and internal drawer supports.

addressed.
where I have best expertise.

(legs and drawers spreaders) as the first sub assembly.

spreaders were detailed (drawn) on inner face of legs
instead of back face of legs.

milling changes to top section and still pull it off.

can draft over actual 3D parts instead of redrawing in 2D.

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On 8/11/2012 5:12 PM, Marty wrote:

Consider doing this, instead of coming up with creative component names, name the original what you want, copy that component to another location on the drawing and simply right click the copy and choose "make unique". The program will automatically give the copied component the same name and automatically add #1, #2 etc. And then modify the copies all you want.

"If" you use "Cut List Pro" in addition to Cut List you can import the data created with Cut List and save numerous steps and having to input any thing into the Cut List Pro program. Accuracy is guaranteed once properly tweaked.
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