Bench Chisels..... What's "Full Set"?

I've been slowly building up my set of bench chisels. I've been bying the "blue steel bench chisels" from The Japanese Woodworker (usual/nominal disclaimers apply). They're not cheap, but I like them, and I've been very happy with the quality and performance.
The question I have is this: What do the experts here consider a "full set" in terms of widths for a set of bench chisels? I've got 1/8", 1/4", 3/8", 1/2", 3/4", 1-1/4", and 2". There's another 7 or 8 widths I could buy (e.g 3/16") , but I don't feel compelled to. Are there any "must have" widths?
The reason I'm asking is this: I'm designing a wall cabinet to hold my fine woodworking tools ( planes, chisels, saws, &tc.). I'd like to feel confident that I'm getting the cabinet laid out right before I build.
Thanks a heap, -Zz
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my
Why not allow space for all sizes available.
If you don't fill it with chisels, maybe +the spirit will move you to put something else useful there<Grin>
Lew
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wrote:

There are also metric sizes. Some have beveled sides, others are straight. And then there are specialty chisels. I have a skew chisel--when you need it there's nothing else better. I have about 10 chisels, never bought a "set," just purchased what I need (like router bits). You can save money using this methodology.
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Sorry, you start with a set, since that's where the bargains lie, and acquire any additional single pieces as you require them. Check the pricing anywhere, and you'll find it true.
If you're going to work in inches, get real inch chisels for the critical things like mortises. The sets with the most common sizes like 1/4,3/8,1/2 and 1" are the way to go. The small ones will trim ends square with proper reference on the sides no matter if you're routing, boring, or chopping from scratch.
Good set of paring chisels follows. Since they will not be used for critical dimensioning, metric is OK. 12mm isn't a half, but with the bevel edge it'll trim a dovetail just fine. Long is nice.
Butt chisels for prying paint cans and other rough work.
You make the area in your cabinet flexible by leaving room. Screw in the holder that contains the number of chisels you have now to replace the one you sarted with as required. There's not much space between the chisels in my cabinet right now due to additions....
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Zz Yzx wrote:

Are all those straight chisels? If so, you need to add some spaces for gouges, angled, corner chisels, etc. Make about 30 spaces just to be sure.
Don't forget a 1" straight.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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I'm no expert, but to me a "full set" is every size and shape available.... I'd leave room for not only lots of other shapes but different sizes in those shapes too. Maybe make it with some sort of expansion in mind.
Kate
I've been slowly building up my set of bench chisels. I've been bying the "blue steel bench chisels" from The Japanese Woodworker (usual/nominal disclaimers apply). They're not cheap, but I like them, and I've been very happy with the quality and performance.
The question I have is this: What do the experts here consider a "full set" in terms of widths for a set of bench chisels? I've got 1/8", 1/4", 3/8", 1/2", 3/4", 1-1/4", and 2". There's another 7 or 8 widths I could buy (e.g 3/16") , but I don't feel compelled to. Are there any "must have" widths?
The reason I'm asking is this: I'm designing a wall cabinet to hold my fine woodworking tools ( planes, chisels, saws, &tc.). I'd like to feel confident that I'm getting the cabinet laid out right before I build.
Thanks a heap, -Zz
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Zz Yzx wrote:

[snip]>
I bought a rather decent Freud set some years ago (my first non-Craftsman set). Big difference. Needed a 1/8" for some cheese slicers and bought an Irwin Marples. Seems OK.     mahalo,     jo4hn
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No idea. But it includes duplicates in some of my favoured widths (i.e. 3/4"), so that I can get a whol day's work done without stopping to sharpen.
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Chisels are like potato chips - can't have just one - set - or just one type. For bench chisels you need a set of beaters, a set of users, and a set reserved for really special work. If you're chopping the waste out of dovetail sockets, the shorter butt chisels are easier to control and manipulate than the longer bench chisels. Then there are the skewed edged chisels, left and right, and the long thin paring chisels and maybe some dwan necked chisels for cleaning up the bottom of rabbets/rebates and dados (assuming you don't have router plane) and crank necked chisels - left and right - for getting into corners.
Like chisels, hand planes proliferate as well.
One cabinet is probably not going to do it - so - aslong as you're making one why not make two - at least the carcase for two. If you use dovetail joints you can label the parts for #2 and store it flat 'til you need it (you will need it)
So - no matter how much planning you do for your wall cabinet, it's going to need to be modified over time.
Now if you go with a modular approach you can arrange and re-arrange things - and replace modules when needed. Doing chisel racks that'll fit in your cabinet doors lets you take the whole rach to the bench rather than going back and forth between the bench and the cabinet. If you use box/finger joints or dovetails, maybe sliding dovetails, then you can change parts of the rack rather than making a whole new rack.
Here are some tool rack ideas http://web.hypersurf.com/~charlie2/ToolRacks/ToolRacks1.html
I've re-arranged my wall hanging tool cabinet four or five times. Easy to do with modular inserts. And if you're a puzzle phreak you'll be amazed at how many tools you can fit in a relatively small space - and still keep them readily accessible. Go through two or three pages of this stuff. Fill In The Blanks is fun - and gives you plenty of practice doing all kinds of joinery and stuff you can use on "house furniture".
http://web.hypersurf.com/~charlie2/WallToolCabinet/RightToolCabinet.html
charlie b
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