Beginners Syndrome

Page 3 of 9  
On 11/20/15 12:41 PM, Swingman wrote:

There's a website called "expert village" that purportedly provides instructions for doing any number of thing provided by "experts" in each field. I've come to nickname many of them as "expert village idiots."
Here's an example that I know you will enjoy, Karl!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RK_j2LE07G0

--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/20/2015 2:17 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

It's a good thing I wasn't eating soup when I watched that.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Greg Guarino wrote:

It mostly went over my head, but I could tell from the comments that it was somehow "wrong". I thought he "talked too much"!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, November 20, 2015 at 2:13:10 PM UTC-6, Bill wrote:

Did you mean: I thought he talked "one two three one two" much.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/20/15 2:22 PM, Sonny wrote:

HA! Reminds me of the old joke about counting in 3/4 time. "One, two, threefour, one, two, threefour." It's better when you hear it. :-)
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/20/2015 2:22 PM, Sonny wrote:

His lyrics suck
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/20/15 6:53 PM, Leon wrote:

You win!
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/20/2015 3:12 PM, Bill wrote:

First he was simply playing in 4/4 time - the most common time signature that practically every pop song is in- but *counting* to five instead, running over into the next measure. Then it went completely off the rails. He was playing in something like the square root of 7 over Pi.
I almost didn't survive the video that YouTube put up as a natural segue from that one: "Expert Village Fails". I could scarcely breathe it was so hilarious.
My favorites were the drum instructor and the very last guy, who was somehow trying to show us how to build a recording studio. I couldn't figure out what part of recording studio building he was trying to show us, but he managed to squeeze in a spectacular number of errors using just a cinder block, a drill, anchors, furring strips and glue.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/20/2015 3:32 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Sorry, here's the link:
https://youtu.be/jvAAycrwyIA
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/20/15 2:12 PM, Bill wrote:

Bill, he was trying to demonstrate playing in 5/4 time which is 5 beats per measure. Most modern music is in 4/4 time, four beat per measure, which it is commonly referred to as.... wait for it.... "common time" designated my a C in place of a fractional 4/4 at the head of a bar of sheet music. Probably the most famous 5/4 song is "Take Five" by Dave Brubeck. Another pop song that everyone knows is the theme song from Mission Impossible. These are both examples of a 5/4 song that sound like odd time. They sound natural and "danceable" to the average listener. Great modern composers like Sting make odd time songs like these the fact that they are in odd time doesn't even enter one's mind, until one tries to clap along. :-)
Hearing great odd time songs that flow so easily and groove so intrinsically can often cruelly lead a musician into thinking they are easy to play and easy to create.
Which leads us to the guy in this video. He thought it was easy and it's so deceptive that it fooled him even while he was attempting to play it. :-) The whole deal with the video, the funny part, is that he's playing what he *thinks* is a 5/4 groove, but he's playing it in 4/4 time and he can't seem to grasp that fact. It's akin to laying out studs on a wall on the half meter (19.2") marks on your tape measure instead of the 16" marks. You may have laid out 7 studs for an 8' plate, but that last stud is going to end up on the next 8 footer.
Basically when this 'expert' is playing his "5/4 groove" he's playing it in 4/4 time, but keeps messing up his counting. He keeps trying to count to 5, but his pattern repeats after beat 4. You can hear when his brain finally stops fighting his hands and he starts counting "2-3-4-5, 2-3-4-5, 2-3-4-5." His brain thinks, "Hey I got it now, I'm playing in 5 because my count is getting to 5 every time." :-D
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/20/2015 3:19 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

https://vimeo.com/6971656
Classic "Nuff said" ... ;)
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
says...

I was an "expert" on one of those sites for a while. Didn't want to be, wasn't my idea, my boss got invited to be the "expert" and didn't have time to do it so he told me to do it. Aero engineering or programming I'd be fine with--been there, done that, got the tee-shirt. Art, antiques, and jewelry, not a clue, and that's what he had me doing. I told him I didn't have a clue, he didn't care, then he was surprised when they figured out that I didn't have a clue and pulled his account.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What a weird website.
"How to prepare your pet for rain" "What panties are best for a small butt" "How to draw bats"
These mostly seem to be questions that don't need to be asked...
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/20/15 3:50 PM, John McCoy wrote:

LOL, yes, you're correct. But thank God there are experts for that.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's important to prepare your fish for rain. Go to the local party/drinks store and buy some little umbrellas for drinks. The fish love those, and it will keep them from getting wet.

Take your boyfriend along and ask his opinion. He'll make sure you look awesome, so long as he doesn't trip over his tongue.

It's like drawing straws, only you pick up bats instead.

Do I qualify as an expert?
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/19/2015 10:19 PM, Bill wrote:

And just to add a bit more. Tools, not the ones you use to cut wood, the ones you use to design with.
I used tp build furniture long before I got my first computer and it took me forever to build something. It really helps prevent many mistakes if you have a scale drawing instead of a picture in your head. ;~)
And until Sketchup I was not terribly fast even using AutoCAD LT. I suspect that Sketchup is as revolutionary to wood workers as the SawStop and Festool Domino...
If you are not using that program yet you should be.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This. I always sketch out what I'm planning to do, with dimensions, before I start. Pencil and paper, because I'm old-school. And generally not a true scale drawing (I could do that, I worked as a draftsman a long time ago), since I find as long as I work out and record all the dimensions, I don't need it to be scale.
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/20/2015 8:59 PM, John McCoy wrote:

I was never a draftsman but was headed in that direction when in school. The trouble with paper and pencil is that the drawing, and especially if not to scale, only gives you an ideal/concept. It does not necessarily give correct dimensions. You can put dimensions on the drawing but if not to scale you have no way to guarantee if the drawing is doable with the dimensions you want. With software you have the ability to have the program double check your thoughts.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If the dimensions aren't right, then the drawing isn't right. There's no point in making an incorrect drawing, whatever tool you use to make it.

If the dimensions add up correctly, then it's doable.
There's nothing that says a drawing has to be 1/4inch to the foot, or even have the same scale vertically as horizontally, for the dimensions to be correct. By the same token, every woodworking magazine starts every issue with a "corrections" paragraph for the dimensions that were wrong in the drawings in the previous issue, despite using some sort of CAD program to create the drawing.
When I make a drawing, I do front view, side view, and top view (and detail views for internal or assembly if I need it for clarity). I dimension everything, and I make sure the dimensions add up. And that includes factoring in tenons, or overlaps on rabbets, or stuff like that. But I simply don't bother making it to scale.
I still cut stuff wrong on occasion, but that's the fault of poor measuring, not the drawing.
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/21/2015 9:45 AM, John McCoy wrote:

Well if the drawing is not to scale, the drawing is not right. You did say you did not do true scale. Or do you consider true scale to be full scale?

I may not be making myself clear about the advantages to using a drawing program vs. pencil and paper drawing. The advantage to a drawing program is that it shows 3D at any angle and can show whether the internal parts fit together correctly. That is not often possible with a hand drawn drawing, especially if you are not visualizing how the pieces fit together when you draw it. Additionally I use a program to import my pieces from a computer drawing into an optimization program. It is a huge time saver and increases accuracy dramatically.

That is correct and in fact I could not tell you what scale my printed drawing are when they print but they are precisely to "some" scale. The scale does not matter as long as everything is to the same scale. But if you are not drawing to scale the drawing can easily be deceiving and dimensions put in by you may not show a problem. With a drawing program the dimensions are automatically calculated between the points you choose and will immediately tell you if the part is the correct size. If you don't use a CAD or drawing program this is very hard to appreciate.

Again if you are not drawing to some scale you are not getting an accurate view of what you are drawing. When you draw to scale you can measure the drawing to get the true accurate dimensions anywhere in the drawing. If not drawing to scale you have to mentally make up what the dimensions will be and that is where an error in calculations can be entered.

No doubt.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.