Beginners Poly Application/Tack Cloth question

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I just tried poly (Minwax wipe-on) for the first time. I used the tack cloth to remove dust before applying it (I never used a tack rag before either).
The tack rag left my fingers sticky enough that I was concerned that it's adhesive may have stuck to the wood and interfered with my finish (as I had to use soap to get it off my hands), but the finish seemed to go on nice enough
Question: Can I use the tack rag after sanding between coats without worry of it interferring with my finish?
BTW, Mike Marlow: I used a wire as you suggested (and an eye-screw) slung around the end of a 2by4 to keep my project off the ground.
For anyone following my "big project", I've got the new switchbox, EMT, AlFLEX, and the drywall replaced. Now I just need to "pretty up" my new drywall on 3 walls. Yesterday I swept-up everything, first time in a long time--it really did made me feel better. Then I bought a roll of 28" wide "contractors paper" to put along the walls (65'). I figured I could mark it off in 20 squares or so (yes, like in Monopoly), number them, and I expect that it would be helpful for QA. Without this, or some other system, I would find the compexity of keeping track of every blemish a bit overwhelming. I myself don't find the process as uniform as what they show in the books! ; ) I guess that comes with time and practice! I'm the kind of person who is not afraid to rip out and re-tape a joint, and when you're like that, the "uniformity in the process" breaks down! ; )
Yesterday, my first day with a drywall knife in my hands for almost a year, I quickly re-learned what I regard as the KEY IDEA concerning the application of drywall mud. Know that "good enough" is good enough, especially in the early stages! : ) I remembered the key idea, but I just had to challenge it, which of course just reinforced why it's the key idea! : )
Have fun! Bill
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Bill wrote:

I just put on the 2nd coat. Comment: The finish sure seems thin. It may take alot of coats to get the protective finish I'm looking for!
The wood seems to absorb the finish very, very fast. So fast that I'm not the least bit worried about dust...lol. The last related finish I used was varnish and, IIRC, it seemed to go on thicker--and stay wet longer.
Bill
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"Bill" wrote in message
Bill wrote:

I just put on the 2nd coat. Comment: The finish sure seems thin. It may take alot of coats to get the protective finish I'm looking for!
The wood seems to absorb the finish very, very fast. So fast that I'm not the least bit worried about dust...lol. The last related finish I used was varnish and, IIRC, it seemed to go on thicker--and stay wet longer. ===================================================================================Wipe on poly is very thin so it goes on easy but it takes many more coats.
Bill
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On 7/30/2012 1:14 AM, Bill wrote:

Yeah. If you want this process to go faster, I use General Finishes ArmrSeal when I need a thick finish. I apply the first sealer coat with a rag and the next/last coat with a Wooster foam brush.

FWIW Varnish is a generic term. By definition, almost any final protective coat is a type of varnish.
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There is no need. Denibbing (sanding between coats) leaves very little dust. I use my shop brush and/or a dry rag to dust in between.

That's the nature of wipe-on, just like Waterlox, and Watco, as well as hand-rubbed spray lacquer. They go on a couple thou thick each coat, but they leave a finish the hand likes to touch, which makes the extra work very well worth it.

Brush-on finishes are like that. Wipe-ons look wetter later, after you get a few coats on. It builds up from a sealer coat into your "protective finish" after the third coat, usually. Dunno 'bout poly. I refuse to use it again.
-- When we are planning for posterity, we ought to remember that virtue is not hereditary. -- Thomas Paine
(comparing Paine to the current CONgress <deep sigh>)
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Larry,
I've applied 2 coats and am waiting the 24 hours, as suggested just about everywhere one might look, before proceeding.
I looked up "denibbing", and I don't think I have any nibs (LOL)! As I mentioned earlier, the finish was practically dry as soon as I was done applying it. This was no-doubt facilitated by the steady 90+ degree temperature in the finishing room. This may change after I build up an "undercoat" and less absorbtion occurs.
Is it still a good idea to give it a quick once over with 320 grit even if it still feels smooth to the touch? I assume so just in case the grain may have swollen and I can't tell...no nibs though! FWIW, the wood is hard maple.
Cheers, Bill
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On 7/30/2012 5:08 PM, Bill wrote:

Don't worry about the "nibs" until you are finished. Then rub it all down with a paper sack or printer paper.
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wrote:

I prefer to catch anything before it's embedded in finish, thanks. It's very quick and simple to do, so I do it. YMMV.
-- When we are planning for posterity, we ought to remember that virtue is not hereditary. -- Thomas Paine
(comparing Paine to the current CONgress <deep sigh>)
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On 7/30/2012 7:35 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Well that is fine but if you are knocking down nibs with paper between coats you are not preventing embedding. IMHO you are simply adding an unnecessary step between coats. Now if the product instructions call for scuffing that is another matter.
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wrote:

If you wish to leave crap in your finish, fine. I wish to minimize it, and that takes denibbing between coats. Just a difference of opinion. As I said, YMMV.
-- When we are planning for posterity, we ought to remember that virtue is not hereditary. -- Thomas Paine
(comparing Paine to the current CONgress <deep sigh>)
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Leon wrote:

Do you think an application of Johnson's paste wax improve the durability of the (satin) finish? Since it's going to be my custom honing strop, I would like to be able to wipe the "black muck" off of it. I'll take a picture of it before I start using it, just in case. ; )
Bill
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On 7/30/2012 8:19 PM, Bill wrote:

NO!, no more so than laying paper on top of the finish. The wax will not protect any more than the product you using for the finish.
Wax on bare wood will improve water resistance for a bit.
I mainly use wax as a lubricant. I use it to make drawers, with out mechanical slides, slide easier. And that tends to last a long time. I also use it to lube screws.
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Leon wrote:

Thanks, I think I can put that information to use (I was thinking of adding a drawer or two to my new woodbench). For now, I need to go play with drywall compound--I seem to resist it, despite how much fun it is. ; )
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Got a wet shop vac and a P100 respirator? <sigh> Water really helps trap the nasty, superfine dust.
-- When we are planning for posterity, we ought to remember that virtue is not hereditary. -- Thomas Paine
(comparing Paine to the current CONgress <deep sigh>)
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Larry Jaques wrote:

I'm glad I sprung for the *vacuum* drywall sander! I've had better luck with shop vac "bags", than water, though I tried water first.
Based on reading another post, I am going to upgrade my shop vac filter to one of the better/best green ones (~$30, at Sears) for this task. I wear an N95 rated dust mask for this and many other tasks.
After doing some other yardwork today, I decided to postpone my drywall work until the conditions are more humane--perhaps after dark.
Here is a related question I had: Is the shop vac filter only there to filter the air it outputs for the sake of the user, or does it protect the unit (in any way)? For instance, if I'm vacuuming wet leaves (the eave troughs), is there any benefit to using a filter?
Bill

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On 7/31/2012 3:34 PM, Bill wrote:

Generally if the filter gets dirty quickly the filter is there to protect the motor and then you, somewhat. Better vacs will draw the debris directly into a filter bag and will have a secondary filter that typically stays very very clean. These type typically do not loose suction until the filter bag is 98 % full and ready to be tossed. The secondary filter will still be quite clean.
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Leon wrote:

Mine is a Craftsman. http://c.shld.net/assets/own/00917066e.pdf
I just looked at the manual again, and it suggested removing the filter when vacuuming large amounts of water (I never have). That doesn't completely answer the question, but I think it is consistent with what you wrote. I'll keep using the filters!
I'm sure it's not as quiet as a Festool, but if it broke I would replace it with the same model. Maybe I'll try hooking it to a TS when I get one! : )
Bill
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On 7/31/2012 7:11 PM, Bill wrote:

Let me say another way, typically if the vac filter is directly exposed to the debris it is intended to protect the motor first, you second. The secondary filters in addition to the debris going straight into the collection bag typically are designed to protect you.

You probably will not be satisfied with a shop vac, any brand, connected to a TS. You really need the volume that a DC offers. TS's have numerous air paths which pretty much make a shop vac ineffective.
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Leon wrote:

No secondary filters here.

Okay. Thank you for making me aware of that. I wasn't sure.
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On 7/31/2012 3:34 PM, Bill wrote:

Generally if the filter gets dirty quickly the filter is there to protect the motor and then you, somewhat. Better vacs will draw the debris directly into a filter bag and will have a secondary filter that typically stays very very clean. These type typically do not loose suction until the filter bag is 98 % full and ready to be tossed. The secondary filter will still be quite clean.
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