begining workshop

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Unless you have been doing woodworking of some sort for a while, I'd recommend looking around your area for woodworking classes. Take a couple of classes and Then decide whether or not you want to start down the slippery slope of tool buying. If you take the classes and decide to go ahead, you already have some experience. Otherwise you may buy a bunch of tools and be selling them next year at a yard sale.
Books and magazines have also been recommended here. Don't forget the library. Note that some woodworking shops also rent videos - a good source of inspiration and knowlege.
Good Luck, and have fun.
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"Lobby Dosser" wrote in message

Best advice thus far, IMO ... along those same lines, and absent a place to take those kind of classes, pick out a simple project that you want to build and buy just what you need to complete it as you go along, repeat.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/05
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Norm (genuflect) has always said that anyone starting a shop needs two big power tiools first: a table saw and a joiner/planer. After that it's a bit broader.
A tip from my experience:
Get two cheap-ish to medium priced cordless drills instead of one good one. Lot easier picking up one to drill the hole and the other to drive the screw rather than changing the drill bit/driver each time. And make sure each unit comes with TWO batteries.
Look for power tools that can double as something else. For instance a bench-top pillar drill is useful as a drill but get a drum sanding set and you now have a very serviceable sanding station.
FoggyTown
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Get used equipment. Sure it takes time, but with patience you can get some very good equipment for around 1/2 the price of new. Makes a big difference in your budget.
I picked up a 1955 vintage Unisaw for $350 that with a little bondo, a coat of paint and some new belts will be great. Though I'm planning about getting her a biesemeyer fence for Xmas so I guess she's not that cheap :) But even with the new fence and some sweat, that unisaw will have cost me about as much as a high end contractor's saw and IMO I got much more for my money.
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Or buy the best drill you can afford and spend $30 or so on a drill/driver set (such as DW2730) where you just extract and flip - no chucking.
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I have to say you guys have all been great with responding to my message and I would like to thank you all....I tryed to respond to a lot of message but sence my little natives are getting restless....lol....I don't have the time...lol...
I think Norm has the right idea for me but with a $1000 it is now iffy in my mind if I can get both a table say and planner (planners are sooooooo neat I just love them, taking an old weatered board and you plane it and it looks so pretty and smooth....)
Today I happened to hit the reply group button so you all should get the message about what I am planning on building I forgot that what you are planning to do is a big part of what tools you get...lol and sence I knew what I wanted to do...sometimes forget that people arn't mind readers...lol
I'm going to start looking for used EQ so I guess that means taking the bull by the horns and going into pawn shops and what not (even though the whole time I'm in one I'll be saying 'Sean don't touch that' and 'Emily no you can't get down' lmao
oh and I never told you guys the two spaces I'm thinking about turning into my workshop. my garage (which the door is to short for my van to fit in) is 10x20 with a concrete floor, Then I have the big space in the barn which is 24x24 with a 11x11 corner pened off (which I thought would make a wonderful kids 'workshop' complete witha gate...lol) but it has a dirt floor (thinking maybe next year we will get a 4 inch slab layed in there)
Deborah
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Deborah,

You should be able to pick up a decent "contractor" tablesaw (or a high end portable) for around $500, a decent portable planer for around $200, and still have $200 left over for a power miter saw.. :)
My old tablesaw is smaller and junkier than even a contractor saw, and it has served me well for over 14 years. I've wanted to upgrade many times, but it's hard to justify the cost when mine still works well (and doesn't take the space the newer saws would).

Until we built our garage a few years ago, I did all of my woodworking out of a small 8x12 shed. I'd pull the tablesaw out in the yard, build my projects on tarps, and put everything away at the end of the day. :) A lot of work, and it restricts you to dry days, but it's certainly possible...
Anthony
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lol...I'm not going to be portering around anything....lol...Right now I need stationary I'm to darn weak to be dragging table saws around....lol...(might have to get that home gym soon...lol)
A power miter saw is on the list of things I need though, Last place we lived the land lord had a laser guided one new in the box that we got to use, along with his portable planer....hehehe invented projects just so I could use them...lol
Deborah

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Deborah,

Many of the "portable" saws come with roller stands to make them easy to move and store. But, you could also build a wheeled cart for the saw, providing a base that includes storage space and expands the support area. With a small workshop, this lets you move the saw out of the way easily when you're not using it.
My saw is "stationary" but I still end up dragging it around to move it out of the way when it's not being used... :)
Anthony
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lol big items I just tend to leave wherever they are and move everything around them. hopefully we will get the EQ one weekend when Hubby is home and he can organize the shop...lol.. I would say se he could move it all around but I know thats not going to happen...lol... Besides I'm a procrasanater and if I have to get the saw out to use it.... lol
Deborah

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HerHusband wrote:

I do projects in my basement and so far I have had to remove the steps on the back porch to get some cabinets out. And it is a pain is the butt to get plywood down stairs, but it can be done.
The room I am working in is 16 X 16. and loaded with, well allot of junk. I've only begun the journey into making it a real workshop, since I doubt that we would ever move out of the city, which I hate.
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HerHusband wrote:

I'm working in a 11x13 (interior - 12x14 exterior) shed. I don't have room for a bandsaw or a sharpening station, but I have a tablesaw, jointer, drill press, stationary belt sander, and workbench plus a bunch of portable power tools (although at my age, calling a 60 pound planer portable is pushing it a wee bit) and hand tools.
I've never had to maove anything outside, but when ripping long stock I do have to open the doors.
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Larry,

Believe me, my 8x12 shed was packed to the rafters with "stuff". :) I couldn't walk in there, let alone do any woodworking. There was only one door, and everything had to go in and out in a specific order. :)
As for using the tablesaw, I can't see ripping a sheet of plywood with anything less than 20' or so. 8 feet in front of the saw, 8 feet behind the saw, 3 feet for the saw itself, and some room for me. :)
Of course, if the shed has doors on two sides, it only needs to be big enough for the tablesaw. Maybe 4'? :)
Anthony
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And how much does a single cut cost at the lumber yard? Das whut I doo... cuz day offah da service...
--
Alex - "newbie_neander" woodworker
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
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Awww but whats the fun in that? lol
Deborah
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my Hubby was saying something like that to me but I think it was that I want atlest 10 ft on either side of the table saw...lol...
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You are doing this in a most interesting way. I am sure that most of us just started somehow and never really made a list of what was needed. If you are totally new to woodworking, the best investment may be in a good woodworking course. This will provide a little experience with some really good tools and may help you decide which of the many paths to woodworking addiction you choose to follow. If you are in the Boston area, I cannot recommend The North Bennet St. School strongly enough. They have a webpage. I took several courses there after 40 yrs of woodworking and wished I had started out with the course. In a way, woodworking is all about learning how to do things; it is much more efficient in a good class than alone at home. Books have their place but watching a good instructor is much more illuminating. Good luck and I hope you enjoy the process. Dave
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lol that is why I'm looking at lower end stuff...lol... I don't know if I can find anything used out here this is a small town...lol
Dedorah
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Deborah Kelly wrote:

I'll probably catch a lot of flak for this, but you could always look for a used Shopsmith. I've seen decent ones for under $500. Then a router, which I forgot in my original response.
I wouldn't buy one sight unseen, but look online for one within driving distance.
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a shop,
Tablesaws: http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?BV_UseBVCookie=Yes&vertical=TOOL&pid922104000&subcat=Table+Saws http://www.grizzly.com/products/item.aspx?itemnumber=G0444Z <<<
Drill press: http://www.grizzly.com/products/item.aspx?itemnumber=G7944 http://www.grizzly.com/products/item.aspx?itemnumber=H0626 <<< The latter is two tools in one, it adds oscillation which is an up and down movement of the spindle for use as a drum sander, bench top mounted.
Jointer: http://www.grizzly.com/products/item.aspx?itemnumber=G0586 <<< http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?BV_UseBVCookie=Yes&vertical=TOOL&pid921706000
Router and bits and table, band saw (negligible), electric hand drill or two, definitely a workbench, hand chisels set, drill bit sets of at least four different types (brad point, regular jobbers, spade bits, forstner bits), make sure they are "high speed steel" except for the spades. And a book all about sharpening, stones, files etc., (Leonard Lee wrote it).
A band saw is not supremely important unless you will be owning a lot of lumber and need to re-saw it to thinner boards, sometimes. As for cutting curves, a hand jig saw or a tabletop scrollsaw would replace it.
And on and on it goes. I know I could do it, but I live in an apartment, so I go to the local adult ed. shop for $10 per class, they have really incredible equipement there. You could have the other half read this whole thread, too. I'd say around $2,500 minimum. Ain't much.
--
Alex - "newbie_neander" woodworker
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
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