Artist or Engineer

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For a rule to be a good rule - it has to have at least one exception. Kelly Johnson, who used Seymore Butts on his secret missions airline tickets, is suely an exception to the rules. Anyone whose job is in The Skunk Works HAS to be an exception - to probably EVERY rule.
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Because many are aliens. Roswell offspring.
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On Tue, 06 Oct 2009 22:12:57 -0700, the infamous charlieb

Two Master Pointes, charlie. <giggle>
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than Christianity has made them good." --H. L. Mencken
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Bill wrote:

I think there is a mix. Numerous like the "doing" and planning, others groove on the result. I like the result. _____________

A. Something simple = no plans
B. Something more complex = "plans" 1. Get a mental picture of desired result. 2. Get yellow legal pad 3. Doodle the parts, not to scale, and dimension same 4. Doodle as necessary how the parts will attach to each other 5. Cut parts 6. Join parts
--

dadiOH
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dadiOH wrote:

As craftsmen, we all know that the best tools fit well and easily in the hand. Sketchup is in this category. After a surprisingly short learning curve, the tool becomes transparent. Compellingly simple is a good description. Many of us have found that we can replace your step 2 above with "Start SketchUp", and also delete the "not to scale" part. Where the pencil was once suitably facile at doodling, I find now that it fails by echoing too closely my faulty imagination and distorted sense of proportions. (At the same time, "compellingly simple" quickly becomes "frustratingly simplistic" when you start to wander far from the blocky shapes that works so well. Which is just as welll. Much of what I would undertake to build in the woodshop are of blocky shapes.)
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I'm learning SketchUp this week and am impressed. However, I can't help but think about what industrialization (and manufacturing) did to furniture design. Is SketchUp users going to encourage "blocky shapes" on its clients? That is, may the likes of SketchUp induce a subtle affect much like that of industrialization? Just a thought.
Bill
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Bill wrote:

There's little danger, IMHO, that your taste in design will suddenly change to match the tool. If that turns out to be the case, however, you will have answered your own question: the engineer will accept the limitations of his tools and environment while the artist will hold true to the ideal and its exprssion. I was cutting 4-square blocky shapes on the tablesaw, planer, and jointer long before Sketchup imposed its blocky world. If your taste is toward free flowing faired curves inspired by and gracefully echoing the figure and grain of carefully selected timbers, I doubt any design tool can replace the touchy-feely eyeballs- and hands-on approach. Sketchup or other CAD can still be the better pencil by overlaying a photo of the grain on the part, but I would be very surprised to find that person comfortable with an elaborate design process. I think that's the short answer: Sketchup appeals to the engineer within. We are satisfied with the design when the artist-within cringes only minimally at the outcome.
The common aesthetic of furniture and furnishings is dominated by straight lines. I don't find this to be at odds with an artistic bent. Efficient and appropriate use of material is itself an art.
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Bill wrote:

As with any tool, only to the neophyte.
"Tools" certainly do influence the outcome of specific tasks, and therefore influence the collection of tasks that make up a piece. "Materials" do the same, arguably to an even greater extent.
That said, it is the artistry with which both are wielded that takes a project out of the ordinary ... take a look at some Michelangelo for an example. :)
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He did that with SketchUp? Wow! ; )
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diggerop wrote:

Who do you think Google bought out to get it! ;)
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"Swingman"wrote

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Lee Michaels wrote:

That would be some headline--"Google buys Vatican".
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wrote in messagean even greater extent.

Few people really know that.
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then there is that DaVinci/Mona Lisa/Photoshop rumour..
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Pssssssst. (you do know that The CABAL monitors this forum right?)
Gotta run - I think I'm being followed.
[choking sound]
[user connection lost]
. . .
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charlieb wrote:

There is no cabal!
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On Sun, 11 Oct 2009 08:48:18 -0500, the infamous Swingman

And the artiste makes up the last third. Some can do extraordinary work with the cheapest and worst tools, or the worst materials, so the artistic bent can be stronger than a third.

Old Mikey? (See sig for comment.)
---------------------------------------------------------- * Michelangelo would have made ** Website Programming * better time with a roller. ** http://diversify.com ----------------------------------------------------------
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On Wed, 7 Oct 2009 08:03:02 -0400, the infamous "dadiOH"

I'm a little of both, with no formal training in either, 'less you count the architectural drawing class I had in 8th grade.

Ooh, Ooh! <waving hands> That's me, too!
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"Giving every man a vote has no more made men wise and free
than Christianity has made them good." --H. L. Mencken
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I am neither, my method of building is to work out a design mentally and when I think I have all the major points worked out in my head, I start cutting and assembling. The details just seem to work their self out as I go along.
I usually pick one or two functions of the piece at hand and work out the sizing and proportions from there, this works great for free standing furniture.
I tend to lean toward the utilitarian side and the designs aren't overly complex to begin with.
My method of working has it downside of course, it will fail miserably with kitchen cabinets, DAMHIKT. There are places where planning and drawing it out is essential to success.
Even on small run production items I will build one to the point of dry assembly, knock it down and then make my patterns and jigs. I dislike repetitive work, after about ten of something it quits being fun and becomes labor and I avoid this kind of work unless I'm trying to make a few quick $.
I have a love hate relationship with sketchup(damn does anyone know how to turn off the snap to midpoint), but the hate part is lessening the more I learn about SU, Goodluck.
basilisk
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Neither artist nor engineer. Ham-fisted amateur would be close to the truth.
My growing up years were spent on a farm, - we were taught to use whatever we had available to construct something we needed, whether it be from wood or steel. Function took precedence over form. Still does for me. I think those early years helped me to attain the ability to visualise a number of ways to construct things with regard to what I have at hand, - ultimately selecting one and building it. I have never drawn up plans for anything. Doubtless there are those who would say that the appearance of my work makes that quite apparent : )
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