Article in Woodsmith # 76

Hello all;
I am looking for an article on a chair seat scooping jig. I believe it is in Woodsmith #76. I believe it uses either a skilsaw or router to scoop out the seat for a windsor chair. If anyone has a copy of the article, would you check to see if that is what it is about?
Thank you in advance,
Dan Harriman Orange, Texas email is woodworkerdan at yahoo dot com
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ranted:

Why go Normite when you can happily Neander this one, Dan?
Hey, all you need is this lovely little bronze tool: http://www.japanwoodworker.com/product.asp?s=JapanWoodworker&pf_id .000.01&dept_id045
or a travisher: http://www.japanwoodworker.com/product.asp?s=JapanWoodworker&pf_id ).103.20&dept_id847
or a scorp, and this one's a great deal: http://www.craftsmanstudio.com/html_p/L5002250.htm
or an adze: http://www.wisementrading.com/woodworking/gransfors.htm #1248 http://www.japanwoodworker.com/product.asp?s=JapanWoodworker&pf_idu.605.060&dept_id 556
-- Friends Don't Let Friends Eat Turkey and Drive --
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calmly

hehehe, good point Larry! I actually saw Norm using those very tools this past weekend. He is making a Windsor chair. I think that I may have seen a bead or two of sweat coming from his brow when he was using them!
I have found the article and it wasn't what I was looking for anyway. It shows how to hollow out the seat for a shop stool.
Take care and make more sawdust,
Dan Harriman Orange, Texas
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ranted:

Amazing! Did you record that? Nobody'll believe you.

Iffen ya wants ta go the Normite route, pick up one of the King Arthur Tools Lancelot disc. It's a 4-1/2" diameter chainsaw. (Ar ar ar) Ditto the Arbortec discs and Kutzall carbide discs.

I'm finally out there doing that and it feels good.
--- Is it time for your medication or mine? http://diversify.com Custom Website Applications
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You can also buy a rubber-backed sanding disk for the DeWalt Low Angle grinder. When loaded with 24 grit, it's _almost_ as agressive as the Lancelot, and slightly safer. Think high power rasp. Available at the BORG. Cheap!
LOTS of fun. Use outside, or clean up the dust for hours.
Just please don't carve another bear from a log, though. It's been done already.
Patriarch
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On Tue, 23 Nov 2004 19:34:37 -0800, Larry Jaques

NFW !!!

Haven't used a Kutzall. The Arbortech is _much_ safer to handle than a Lancelot - my favoured power tool for hollowing seat bases, and life's too short and tiresome already to carve an arse-rest in an elm seat base using a scorp and curved drawknife.
The chainsaws disks have a vicious tendency to kick back. The Arbortech has different shaped teeth and doesn't do this. It's still terrifying, but only in a good way.
--
Socialism: Eric, not Tony

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I watched a fellow (David Ambrose I believe) do this using a scorp, drawknife and shave and he did it *amazingly* fast; I am not entirely sure it could be done faster with a non-automated power tool. Mind you he uses Pine for the seat.
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Paul Kierstead responds:

Gotta go with Andy on this one. Elm is the reason. A big "No thanks!"
Many other woods are easier, faster in such use. Pine, poplar (pick one), red oak even if it's knot free, alder, cherry, butternut, walnut, and others.
Elm can be a bitch to work by hand. American elm, if you can find any, is cross grained, while slippery elm, more readily found, tends to wild grain that is hard to work.All the elms I've seen fuzz up so finishing is a bit of a PITA, though when done, they look great. I don't know what kind of elm they've got in Blighty, but I'd guess it isn't much more fun for hand work.
Charlie Self "Giving every man a vote has no more made men wise and free than Christianity has made them good." H. L. Mencken
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On 26 Nov 2004 12:29:33 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

Dead, mostly. Since Dutch elm disease hit in the '70s. A piece big enough for a seat base is now worth good money. As you said, interlocked grain is the problem with hand working it.
Actually we have _lots_ of elms, just not a useful size. Our elms (except wych elm) reproduce by suckering and the beetle-borne diseases kill the trunk rather than killing the root crown. If you look around hedges when the leaves are off you can often see a line of small elm trees in the hedge, all but the last one are dead. The tree puts up a stem that grows happily for a few years until it's a small tree, maybe 8' high and 4" diameter. Below this size, the beetles don't bore into it. When it gets a bit bigger the beetles arrive and kill the new trunk. The root responds by suckering and forming a new stem a few feet away. A few years later, the cycle repeats again. This seems to be on the opposite side from the original stem's source, so these new trunk form a straight line. I've seen lines of five or six dead trunks that must have been growing like this since the disease's original arrival.
Still, if you're going to import problematic foreign critters, at least elm beetles aren't as bad as Stalin's Giant Crabs http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2004/02/28/wcrab28.xml&sSheet=/portal/2004/02/28/ixportal.html
--
Smert' spamionam

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On Fri, 26 Nov 2004 03:27:42 +0000, Andy Dingley

Wuss! <g>

One could lose 2 pounds (weight, not Brit money) doing so, though. It's both good exercise physically and a good hand/eye coordination test.

Chainsaw teeth have anti-kickback rails shaped very much like the Arbortec discs. If Arbortec's products weren't double that price, I'd have one already. Both are equally dangerous, much like every other tool we own. This is a dangerous hobby.
-------------------------------------- PESSIMIST: An optimist with experience -------------------------------------------- www.diversify.com - Web Database Development
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On Fri, 26 Nov 2004 08:34:04 -0800, Larry Jaques

No, they're both dangerous, but one is much worse than the other. Go to an outdoor carving event and ask around.
Arbortechs are cheaper anyway. It's only the carbide tipped arbortech that's expensive.
--
Smert' spamionam

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calmly

some of us have to get the presents done by Christmas!
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