Analine dye problem


Using a black analine dye on white oak. Problem is the dye doesn't penetrate deep enough into the open grain. Used foam and bristle brushes with similar poor results. Mixed dye as per instructions on the label, even added a drop of dish detergent to get the solution 'wetter' but no joy. Oak was sanded to 150, shop-vac'd then wiped down with a wet shop rag. Any suggestions as to what I need to do for deeper grain penetration?
scrub
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I'm no expert but I've seen articles recently about using india ink to ebonize.
Scrub wrote:

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The stuff I've seen analine dye on was not "ebonized"- it just dyed the grain and increased the contrast on the piece. FWIW though, I did do a project that was ebonized using india ink a couple of weeks ago, and it worked great.

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Are you talking about getting the dye down into to grain lines and you are seeing little white lines? This is very common with Red oak and less with White but I've seen it.
You were on the right path with the detergent. It is a surface tension problem. I assume you are using a water based solution of Analine if you were adding detergent.
One idea might be to try an alcohol based solution. Harder to work with but depending on the form of the piece might be better.
The other thing (that I do with water based stain on Rad Oak) is to scrub it in. You need to get a stif bristle brush and actually scrub it into the grain. Go both against, with the grain and in circular. You aren't necessarily getting the bristles into the grain, just breakling the surface tension soi it can flow in on its own.
I've also found when using NGR type Analine pre-mixes that flooding the surface gives a much better color than just dainty application.
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I used alcohol based transtint dye on white oak with great results.
Grant
"SonomaProducts.com" wrote:

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I've recently had very good luck using black shoe dye on maple. I'll test a piece of red oak and see how that goes.
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I've tried all the usual fixes: detergent, application variations (spray, brush, you name it)...
Bottom line is water based dyes don't like coloring oak pores. I follow the dye with tinted topcoats. That hides those pesky light spots. It takes more experimentation, because you'll be adding color post-staining. If someone's got a better idea when you absolutely, must use a WB dye stain, please offer it up!
Dave
Scrub wrote:

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Flooding the surface is the best you can do. Note that you will get color reversal in any case with ring porous and rayed woods like oak. I have been doing some experimentation on black ash, though with alcohol as the vehicle, and find the dye superior to ink, permanent marker (which is purple) and Minwax Jacobean. Blotting with the cotton T-shirt worked better than brushes.
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