Air drying lumber

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I googled and read what was available, but have some questions...
1) Everyone says to sticker, but no one defines it. Is that separating the boards with 1x2s? 2) The ends must be painted. With what? If I don't paint, will I ruin the board, or just a few inchs on the end? 3) Is there anything worth reading about this on the web?
I have a lead on some really cheap hard maple and a nearly empty barn. Might as well put it to use.
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Yes, "stickers" are basically strips of wood placed between rows of lumber for drying. The ends of freshly cut logs usually are "painted" with a product called anchor seal. It's basically a waxy covering to seal moisture from escaping the endgrain, thereby preventing cracking/splitting. Latex paint can be used for this in a pinch. If the wood is already cut and has been air drying for a while, sealing the ends is not necessary. Here is a site I have a link to: http://ianrpubs.unl.edu/forestry/g60.htm Although this site recommended using roofing cement as a sealer, I'd advise against it as it would be way more messy than Anchor seal. --dave

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And often not possible. Depending on the wood, and the conditions, it may have checked (split) quite a ways in from the end. How much you lose from the end is difficult to predict, without more information. The sooner you seal, the better.
Woodturners, who often use very green wood, like to get there before the chain saws cool down.
The point is to try to even out the moisture migration process, to let the stresses balance slowly.
Patriarch
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You guys are kind of missing the point of why we kiln dry lumber. It's not only to dry the wood in a hurry compared to air drying. It also "sets" the cells of the lumber making it stable. In the old days lumber was primarily quarter sawn , right? The reason is that they didn't have the kilns like we do today. We actually air dry a lot of our lumber but always run it through the kiln, with the exception of a portion of carving wood. I'm not saying it's not perfectly fine to use air dried lumber for some projects but it's definately not for everything.
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For an alleged sawmill lady you come up with the most ridiculous statements. Compression setting of the wood in a kiln is a desired outcome? Really? Have you never heard of honeycomb? Further, as demonstrated by data from FPL, as graphed in Hoadley, repeated moisture cycles equalize air and kiln dried stock in stability.
The reason the old folks used quartered stuff is they had stock big enough, and enough of it. If you saw for a living, you probably know the difference between sawing for yield and sawing for grade. They knew it moved less across the face of the board, and more important, it was easier to select pattern and color-match for glue-ups if desired. Then there are those woods which show ray figure on the quartered face....

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George, I'd say having over 400,000 bf of various species of dried and air drying lumber moves me out of the alleged catagory. Of course I know what the term "honeycomb" is. I didn't say anything about the process of which lumber is kiln dried. Every species varies a bit as to the method, so I'm not going into detail. I'm just pointing out that kiln dried lumber is more stable.Why do you think it's taken down to 6%?
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"Jana" wrote in message

References please.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
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On 21 Nov 2004 08:59:31 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Jana) wrote:

You really don't have a clue, do you ? You not only tell your customers this "Only bone-dri (tm) kilned wood is stable" rubbish, you actually believe it yourself.
--
Smert' spamionam

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The biggest bonus to the end user of KD that I read was bugs get killed when KD. Of course there is plenty of old furniture around that was not KD and has survived hundreds of years. May the value of KD is in home building if you use a species of wood that has lots of bugs waiting to bore out.

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On Sun, 21 Nov 2004 21:09:04 GMT, Jim Behning

So what ? Few bugs that eat green timber also eat dry timber. Bugs that eat dry timber are generally capable of flying in and finding it for themselves.
Now your local bug species will vary, but I know my waney edged stacks came into the shed absolutely _full_ of longhorn beetles, and I don't mind their company one bit. They eat oak sapwood, they rarely burrow into the heartwood, and when they fly off to lay again they're looking for standing timber, not my stocks.
I've had more Evil Critters (i.e. powder post beetles) come into the workshop in old chisel handles (instant firewood) or old moulding planes (rapid squirting with Juice-Of-Death) than I ever had in green or air-dried timber.
--
Smert' spamionam

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On Sun, 21 Nov 2004 22:10:29 +0000, Andy Dingley wrote:

My old departed contractor pappy always used KD framing lumber since the shrinking was avoided and nothing twisted or warped after the framing was done. He was always on the boyz to keep the stacks covered 'til used and avoided framing if possible until things could be covered before getting rained on - in western Washington State (similar to merry old England). He also insisted nothing be more tha 1/8" out of square, plumb and level over the full dimensions of the project and within any major feature - not easy to do!
-Doug
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KD construction lumber? If it sat in a warehouse for a couple weeks it was already changing. Those pieces on the outside of the pallet were at EMC within 2-3 weeks, while the inside were less adapted. Of course, once installed, they all equalized at EMC anyway, so what purpose was served by the process escapes me.
Though, come to think, Seattle would be about the perfect climate for the "S-Dry" 20% studs. They'd only pick up a little bit of extra moisture....

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On Mon, 22 Nov 2004 07:31:26 -0500, George wrote:

After framing many buildings with KD vs green, the results reveal the purpose of KD - straight walls that remain straight, no cracks in finish walls after drying, etc. IOW, quality construction that lasts.
-Doug
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OK, your straw man is "green."
My point is that KD means very little once it leaves the kiln.

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On Mon, 22 Nov 2004 12:13:54 -0500, George wrote:

Probably not if you float it down the river to the construction site, but KD is normally wrapped for some protection from the weather. Are you suggesting there is no difference in construction quality using KD and non KD lumber both having been kept in a reasonable environment?
-Doug
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Nope, As I mentioned in the original post, 20% as is the standard in US is a good all-purpose MC for wood used in construction. In Seattle, might be a touch low. Here, a touch high.
Makes no difference with rain. Casual water is gone in a day, unless you stand the board in it.
But hey, it was a minor point, though instructive, that the MC of wood leaving the kiln is meaningless a week later - period.

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On Mon, 22 Nov 2004 11:02:09 -0700, Doug Winterburn

I would. With the emphasis on "reasonable" environment. In my climate outside the peak of Summer I couldn't keep kilned timber remotely near the MC it was originally delivered with. Maybe for interior shopfitting work in a completed building I could do it, but certainly not for "construction".
OTOH, the only "construction grade" timber I'm likely to see is kilned, not air-dried, so this question is rather academic. And the building work that I do myself is more likely to be green timber trad-framing anyway.
On the third hand, I'm not doing construction work anyway, I'm a furniture maker and working mainly with temperate local hardwoods. There's an attitude of superiority amongst kiln operators that their timber is superior, even their boil-in-the-bag beech. yet for long-term stability it's not a patch on air-dried. I don't work to 1/8" accuracy, that's my idea of an aesthetic size increment between two adjacent rails. I think of "accurate" and "stable" as being when I can't feel any step when I run a finger over the surface, or that a joint won't start to telegraph through a veneer layer in decades to come.
--
Smert' spamionam

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On Mon, 22 Nov 2004 07:48:00 -0700, Doug Winterburn

So who is talking about green timber ? We're talking kilned vs. air-dried.
My toolchest drawers (air-dried) are still working in this weather. My friend's (kilned) are jammed shut. I often work with larch - kilning that it is fit only for the pretzel factory.
There are two drawbacks to kilned timber, neither of which is really a drawback, just a "non advantage" that is falsely claimed for it. One is the low moisture content - sure it's that dry when it leaves the kiln, but nothing is going to keep it at that level, once it equilibriates. Secondly the stability - kilned timber is no more stable than air-dried, and _considerably_ less stable than good air-dried timber that has been seasoned several seasons, longer than is minimally necessary to get the MC down. Older wood does become less sensitive to moisture changes, and this (crudely speaking) is tied to its age in slow cycles. A "fast bake" is no substitute.
--
Smert' spamionam

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On Mon, 22 Nov 2004 18:13:15 +0000, Andy Dingley

skillfully kiln dried lumber is generally fine to work with. 'specially if you give it a few months in the rack before you start cutting.... : ^ )
poorly kiln dried lumber is flat out ruined. case hardened stuff goes wild as soon as the blade hits it...
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On Mon, 22 Nov 2004 18:13:15 +0000, Andy Dingley wrote:

Fine. You frame your house with non KD lumber. I'll go for KD doug fir. Good luck.
-Doug
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