air comp revisited

Well, It looks as if by moving the water trap 6ft away from the tank I have stopped my water vapor in its tracks. For painting anyway, I still get noticable water in the air tools, but only if the compressor is running continuous. I can see that in the near future I will be running steel pipe to my main work area then putting in a second water trap. So, for painting and sandblasting purposes my current configuration is working well enough. I got a nice finish on my camper today and plan on painting the top tomorrow.
Another thought is that todays humidity level was only 43%. That may have also helped with the painting.
Rich
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I have a large water trap approximately 20' from my compressor. I run a flexible 25' 3/8" line to my sandblasting pot which has a water trap as well. I haven't been able to do any sandblasting for over a week now because of moisture. I have a drain in my compressor which is a large 42 cfm four cylinder, dual stage. Our humidity and dew point has been very high during this time. I have the recommended drains and elevations but still can't get beyond the moisture problem. Guess I'll just have to wait for some cooler, drier weather. This configuration worked great for several days before the humid weather moved in. sdh.
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I know this subject has been beat to death but I'll venture in and offer some advise. I manage operations for several auto dealerships and we have some twenty air compressors including some specifically for our painting operations.
In the paint booths we use refrigerated air dryers. They dry the air completely. However, in all other applications, I have designed a non-refrigerated air dryer system. Its very simply and I use it at my home shop as well.
Simply install 4 sets of 3/4" iron pipe in 7'-8' sections vertically (up and down) against a shaded wall inside out as long as it's in the shade all day. Install a 6" drip leg at the bottom of each section with a ball valve. This creates a simple condenser that relies on air and wall temperature to cool the air and condense the moisture.
From your compressor, run a line (flex line or otherwise) to the condenser. At the end of the home-made condenser, install a filter/dryer, then plumb the rest of your system or simply connect directly to the filter/dryer.
Drain your compressor at the end of each day and drain the drip legs as well. You will have sufficiently dry air with no other issues. I do NOT recommend PCV or copper pipe or will I get into any debates on thier merits.
Dave

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I can understand not using PVC, but what's wrong with copper? Is it a pressure rating issue or is there some other reason? I don't care to debate merits. Just curious.
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mp wrote:

Copper is no longer allowed by code for gas pipes in most localities--some folks I know found out why the hard way. Perhaps that's what he has in mind. But those considerations shouldn't apply for shop air--if the pipe breaks nothing particularly terrible happens.
--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
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J. Clarke wrote:

What's the problem with copper? In my old dive shop days, I can remember many shops used copper tubing for pressures up to 2475 psi. I never did as my compressor could crank out 5000 psi at 15 cfm; we used stainless steel tubing instead. But copper was common throughout the industry (at least back in the 1970s and 1980s).
I can't remember ever hearing of a fitting letting go or tubing failing.
--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN

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I used schedule 40 PVC which has printed on it a 600PSI rating. No problems yet.
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Oh for crying out loud! Now you've done it!
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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wrote:

Ssshhhhhhhhh . . maybe no one will notice. In the meantime Mark, go take a look here:
http://groups.google.com/groups?safe=images&ie=UTF-8&as_ugroup=rec.woodworking&as_usubject=PVC&lr=&hl=en
--
Nahmie
The law of intelligent tinkering: save all the parts.
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