Advice Wanted for Jointer Fence Repair/Replacement

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I picked up a Delta 37-285 Jointer on craigslist for $75.... hmmmm.... I think I forgot to *gloat* about that. :-)
It works great, as far as the motor, cutters, table, and all that go.
The problem is in the adjustable fence. The parts that make it adjustable are made of that pot-metal that they used for the longest time. You can see in the following lousy picture that they have cracked.
http://www.mikedrums.com/fencecrack.jpg
I've been using it without the fence. But I'd like to replace these parts. They ARE NOT available from Delta or online retailers.
My options, as I see them, are to... a) find old ones 2) build new ones out of hardwood, or III) find new parts/assembly that fit this
I'm not thrilled about option "a" because I'll just get parts that will crack, sooner or later.
So shoot... what do you think I should do? Ideas and advice, let me have 'em!
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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Does the anti-kickback porkchop still work?
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Robatoy wrote:

>
I was waiting for that. :-)
And some better pics (I replaced the original, too)...
http://www.mikedrums.com/fencecrackside.jpg
http://www.mikedrums.com/fencecracktop.jpg
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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Now I've got to clean my monitor! Of course it won't work without the fence. Tom
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Yikes!
Check out:
http://www.mikestools.com/Delta-Jointers-Parts-Lists_2284.aspx
This might help -- I've gotten replacements parts from them in the past.
Joel
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

When I said, they aren't available, I meant it. :-p
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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"-MIKE-" wrote:

Option IV:
Use broken parts as mold and lay up epoxy & knitted glass to make replacement parts.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Yeah, it looks as if they were cast. I bet an aluminum casting company could knock the sucker out in a few minutes.
As an alternative, see if your local high school or vocational school has a metal shop. They cast aluminum stuff (i.e., wall plaques, flagpole eagles, etc.) all the time. I'll bet they would enjoy something different.
An even better alternative is to do your own foundry work! Here's a step by step instruction set (there's probably dozens of similar techniques on the web). You'll need:
2 large coffee cans A drill with a 3/8" bit A steel "tin can" Some instant-light charcoal A hair dryer with an air-only setting Some tongs and leather gloves A shit-load of aluminum cans Tin snips Molding sand (sand + kitty-litter clay) Container for the sand Bucket of water
Looks like this set-up can handle a bit less than a pint of molten aluminum, but it's obvious the technique can be scaled up to handle any reasonable amount.
Frankly, this looks like fun. There's fire and smoke and noxious fumes and molten metal and screaming neighbors and all kinds of dangerous stuff.
http://www.instructables.com/id/Build-a-foundry-and-sand-cast-aluminum/
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HeyBub wrote:

Ever since I saw "World's Fasted Indian," I've been wanting to do just that.
Maybe this is my excuse. :-)
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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-MIKE- wrote:

Once you pee on a lemon tree you don't need an excuse ...
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
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Swingman wrote:

I pee everywhere else, might as well pee on a lemon tree.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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*snip*

*snip*
That's a cool idea! I'd be afraid to try it because of the addiction of yet another hobby. You might be able to use a crusher dust rather than the sand if it'll lock together better. I know a lot of sand out there is quite round in shape and doesn't lock together well.
Puckdropper
--
"The potential difference between the top and bottom of a tree is the
reason why all trees have to be grounded..." -- Bored Borg on
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Puckdropper wrote:

Yeah, the right kind of sand is important for detailed work, as is the moisture content (imagine pouring molten metal into mud!). It also needs to be sifted through a suitable mesh. If the object is 3-dimensional, you might need two interlocking sand-holders and pour/vent channels.
I bet you could hone your technique using lead, which melts at a much lower temperature. I used to cast lead bullets and fishing sinkers - pretty trivial but kinda fun.
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

You never know, that might be something I'd get into.
If I had machining tools, I'd go for aluminum.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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"-MIKE-" wrote:

Be careful, glass and resin is a slippery slope.
Like sex, once you try it.................................
Lew
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I would ask over at owwm forum (Old Wood Working Machines).
Or, consider having something made. Doesn't need to be exactly the same parts, jsut dream up some simple clamp and angle and have it fab'd.

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-MIKE- wrote:

This may be usefully in finding used parts. If nothing else it is an interesting site.
http://www.owwm.com /
I do like the mold-your-own idea.
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Try Cattail Foundry. Some info can be found on old wood working machines .org and .com. A Google search may work as well.
Mike in Ohio
-MIKE- wrote:

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Your local Vo-Tech school should have a machine shop. Rather than cast one, I'm sure one could be machined.
Sonny
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Unless it is a private school, chances are they will not do the work. I know they won't around here.

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