Advice Please: Bandsaw & Drill Press Project machines

I have some metal and woodworking projects I'd like to get to, but first I have to get to two project machines(Drill Press & Bandsaw) that I picked up a couple months ago.
http://s290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools /
I'm getting ready to clean them up, but I'd appreciate any recommendations on where I can get parts.
I assume that I'll have to take the Drill Press' motor apart
The Drill Press has a single phase 3/4" horse power motor that I'll have to take apart, but I'd like to find a simular motor for the bandsaw.
Going by the pics, can anyone tell me if there are any specific parts I should be scouting for?
Any recommendations would be appreciated.
Thanks a lot.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
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Did you try the manufacturer's web site? Ebay?

If you say so. Right now, I can't imagine why you'd have to.

I don't know what a "simular" motor is, so I don't know where you'd find one. Why do you have to take the Drill Press motor apart?

Not without knowing why you are taking things apart in the first place.
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There is no manufacturer' s website, and no reference to parts for this Drill Press on eBay.
And the reason for taking it apart is because of the rust. I have no idea if corrosion has spread to the internal parts of the motor.
And a "simular" motor means finding another 3/4 hp motor, single phase motor for the bandsaw.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
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Searcher7 wrote:

See:
http://www.grizzlytools.com/products/Motor-3-4-HP-Single-Phase-3450-RPM-TEFC-110V-220V/G2531
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Jack Novak
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Searcher7 wrote:

Motors like this are considered as throw away items.
Most of the time it is less costly to replace than to try to repair.
Lew
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simular vs. similar
He was chiding you about your failure to use your spell-checker.
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I know. But both words definitions are sim.., uh close. :-)
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
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Here is a quote I got from someone else: "That drill press sold for around $80 new in the early 1980's without an electric motor."
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Searcher7 wrote:
... snip

...snip
Do the motors run? If so, I wouldn't take them apart. Looking at the pieces, it looks like your biggest problem is rust that is going to need to be cleaned up.
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As for the drill press, I can try punching out that wooden dowel in the center of the motor pulley and placing it on the spindle after I find some belts. Then turn it on and go from there.
The bandsaw doesn't have a table or motor, yet. And I'm going to need to replace that rusty blade. I don't have a parts list to determine what else I still need.(All of the loose parts are in the pics).
Thanks.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
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On Fri, 13 Jun 2008 22:45:02 -0700, Searcher7 wrote:

Drill Press--- The spindle of the drill press should have some press fit sealed ball bearings that it spins in. I would remove the chuck assembly and with out any belts, spin the quill pulley to make sure there are no bad bearing sounds. There should also not be any wiggle of the quill.
There should be a slot in the quill / spindle for driving a wedge to remove the chuck assy.
The object to minimize run-out. As drill presses get old and worn out, or if it was cheaply made, the drill in the chuck will not spin exactly centered in the spin. This wobble can be measured. Others can describe how to measure the run out in another thread.
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wrote:

I've been researching that.
Here is a quote I got from someone else: "I have two of them, the spindle/quills are so sloppy that they are next to useless."
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
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