Advice for dado blade

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I just bought a Jet table saw and I would like to buy a dado blade for it. I see there are "sets", a wobble type and 6" and 8". I would appreciate some advice and maybe a recommendation of a manufacturer.
Thanks
Keith
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The wobble ones are junk, stay away from them.
Top of the line (and price tag) is Forrest, for both regular blades and dado sets. Freud makes very good stuff too, as does CMT.
I've got a 6-inch set from Lee Valley (url below). It's a decent quality set, but now I need larger capacity. My old saw wouldn't take an 8-inch dado blade. I just got a new saw and am upgrading to an 8-inch set. If you're interested, make me a reasonable offer on the old one (it's gotten very little use and is in near-new condition). My new set is a Freud model 508.
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.asp?page0061&category=1,41080,41165, 41173&abspage=1&ccurrency=3&SID
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It may have its uses, but, IMO, you can safely stay away from the wobble variety for most of your woodworking tasks.
Freud, Forrest and Amana make some of the best stacked dado sets, which consist of two outside blades of even thickness, and varying thickness 'cutters' and 'spacer's, sandwiched in between preciseness in setting the width of the dado.
You can buy cheaper brands, and they will work fine, but you generally get what you pay for in quality and long lasting sharpness.
An 8" stacked set is desirable for an increased depth of cut, depending upon your table saw, but for most dadoes a 6" will also work, and may generally be a bit cheaper ... again, your saw may have something to say about this.
Basically, if you are a serious woodworker, get a carbide tipped, 8" set of the highest quality you can afford and you won't go wrong.
One thing to consider in a stacked dado set is whether it will give you a flat bottomed dado ... many give a flat bottomed dado, but with "bat ears" in the bottom corners. These can be unattractive on a visible, through dado and bug some folks, so ask around.
I use an 8" Amana set I've had for a few years and it has cut a lot of dadoes, and hasn't needed sharpening yet ... it does exhibit slight "bat ears", but has never posed a problem for my way of working. What I don't like about it in particular are the plastic shims that come with it, but they can be replaced with other types quite easily.
--
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Last update: 12/29/03
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On Mon, 29 Dec 2003 21:48:38 GMT, "Keith Boeheim"

Get a _stack_ dado.
Freud makes several good to excellent sets at varying price points, and Forrest makes the "king".
Barry
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I
I had always heard that wobble dados were junk, but when I saw a Delta for $20 I couldn't resist. It really isn't that bad. I expect it doesn't compare to even a cheap stacked set, but for the amount I expect to use it, it is fine. You must bear in mind that the Forrest set everyone is recommending is $250.
Actually I prefer to use a router. It is slow, but the results are perfect. I haven't tried it, but I wonder if it would make any sense to remove most of the material with a wobble dado, and then make the final cut with a router. Anyone tried it that way?
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Generally you don't make dado's very deep, 1/4" - 1/2" so a 6" one covers the bases nicely.
I use both a wobble and a stackable. If appearance isn't a requirement I'll use the wobble because it is easier to set up, when I need a clean looking bottom is required then I use the stackable.
--
Mike G.
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On Mon, 29 Dec 2003 18:01:00 -0500, "Mike G"

I've always wondered about using a 6" dado set on a 10" saw.... seems like the tip speeds would be a bit slow. of course torque would be better, which is probably a good thing where the saw is removing so much material. do you have to feed slowly with the 6" set?     Bridger
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A tough question to answer I'm afraid Bridger.
I feed at a speed that feels comfortable. A speed where I can feel the resistance of the wood and blade contact but not where it feels like the board is being forced into the blades or it wants to chatter.
With a 3 horse motor torque isn't really and issue. I doubt I could feed the stock fast enough to stall the blade no matter what I did.
--
Mike G.
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I
If budget is limited, I'd take a look at the Freud SD208 8" Stacked Set. Its going for $69.99 at Amazon at present. A good deal. http://tinyurl.com/3a766 I picked one up a month ago and its working a treat so far.
-- Regards,
Dean Bielanowski Editor, Online Tool Reviews http://www.onlinetoolreviews.com ------------------------------------------------------------ Latest 5 Reviews: - Workshop Essentials Under $30 - Festool PS 300 Jigsaws - Delta Universal Tenoning Jig - Ryobi Reciprocating Saw - Infinity Router Bits ------------------------------------------------------------
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On Tue, 30 Dec 2003 09:50:19 +1000, SawEyes wrote:

Or more frugal yet, the Harbor Freight 8" stacked set for $20. Bought it a year or two ago and it works for me.
-Doug
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wrote in

What's the max rpm rating of that HF set? I'm guessing it's a lot less than the Freud.
Dan
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On Tue, 30 Dec 2003 00:28:16 +0000, Dan wrote:

4500. I wouldn't put it on a router, but I don't know of any TS or RAS that gets close.
-Doug
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Doug Winterburn said:

Actually, some of Delta's saws, notably the TS-300 and 36-600 run at 5400 RPM. There may be others. Check carefully before exceeding the recommended operating speed of any sharp, quickly rotating parts. ;-)
FWIW,
Greg G.
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On Mon, 29 Dec 2003 21:13:02 -0500, wrote:

The TS-300 is a direct drive Chiwanese and the 36-600 is an "internal belt" drive. Both are the non-Viagraized stubby arbor types that can't take a stacked dado anyway. Real saws with the looooong arbors and normal belt drive run at less than 4500 RPM.
I use the stacked dado on my old RAS (3450 RPM) as my tabletop TS has a stubby arbor :-(
-Doug
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Doug Winterburn said:

Not at all true. I have motor from a TS-300 and a 36-600 saw in my garage. Both types will take a full 13/16 stacked dado head cutter - as per Delta's specs. I never would have bought the 36-600 oh so many years ago if it had not accepted a normal dado. I used a Freud SD208. <g>
Greg G.
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Those saws have universal motors and turn that fast only with no load. As soon as you start cutting something the RPM drops off. At any rate, you'd probably want nothing larger than a 6" dado on either of them anyway.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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Doug Winterburn wrote:

My Grizzly G1022 contractor saw spins at 4700 RPM. I passed on the HF set. I thought about putting a smaller pulley on the motor... <g>
-- Mark
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I have been using this HF blade on a G1022 with no problems. I think the 4500 RPM limit is conservative. This blade used to be rated at 7000 RPM a few years ago. If you look at the HF website, the photo of the blade shows 7000 RPM. The blade does work very well for the money.
Neal

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wrote in

Really? My Grizz 1022 is 4700.
Dan
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On Tue, 30 Dec 2003 04:21:09 +0000, Dan wrote:

Then stay far, far away. Still works for me (no flying carbide sharpnel tips). I run the Griz 2" dia shaper cutters on my RAS at 20,000 (or less with a router speed control) RPM and don't wring my hands.
-Doug
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