Academic Paper: Noise Transmission Study of A Table Saw

Hello,
I'm a beginner woodworker and took the plunge to buy my first Forrest WWII table saw blade.
I was doing some research online for pros/cons with regards to buying a blade stabilizer. I noticed the various discussions in this newsgroup about noise reduction and cleaner cut benefits when stabilizers were used. I ran across the following Sept. 2006 research study from the Michigan Tech University which shed some light onto this issue, as well as general issues about table saw noise, which is beneficial to read. The paper is only 6 pages long.
http://www.me.mtu.edu/courses/meem4704/project/papers/nc03_table_saw.pdf
After reading this paper, I guess there is still some controversy about noise reduction in using stabilizers. Here are my thoughts and summary:
- study was done on Craftsman 10-inch open stand contractor table saw - main contributing noise frequency range is 2.5kHz to 8KHz - motor and blade components contributed the most noise (quite obvious) - adding stabilizers did not reduce noise level. In fact, it increased the noise level, both under no load and load condition (wood was cut) - recommended a chasis with open-cell acoustic foam be added as best method in reducing noise to the table saw - conclusion did state that the stabilizer did not reduce noise but they think that it may improve the cut quality (not tested). They also recommended further studies using diferent blade designs and other blade stabilizers to be more thorough - in general I'm not too concerned with noise levels since I always wear hearing protection. This study was addressed specifically at the construction trade, where hearing loss is a common hazzard
I would agree with the last statement since they only tested one blade and one stabilizer. What was surprising was that adding in the stabilizers increases the noise level. Compare graphs 3 versus 4 and you'll see that even under no load conditions (no wood cutting), just adding on the stabilizers increased the noise level. But I'm skeptical since only one blade and one type of stabilizer was used.
I have not used stabilizers before therefore was curious if those who have good blades and good stabilizers find that adding increased or decreased the noise level?
For now, I will use my Forrest blade without stabilizers and then one day I'll add them in to see if the cut quality improves.
Cheers,
-Win
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Good!
No offense, but your time would be much better doing some actual woodworking.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/29/06
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
(snip) No offense, but your time would be much better doing some actual woodworking.
Yes! IMHO those stabilizers simply help prevent thin kerf blades from flexing under heavier use, so in some situations the cut quality would be better. Never noticed any difference in noise levels. Just install and enjoy your WWII. --dave
wrote in message

I choose Polesoft Lockspam to fight spam, and you? http://www.polesoft.com/refer.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

With the bulk of the noise generated by the tooth/gullet pattern and strain reliefs sucking air, I wouldn't expect the stabilizer, which was designed to stabilize, to do much for it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I didn't take offense at all and completely agree that I need more time doing woodworking than Internet researching. It is too easy to get caught up in all the technical nit-picky details.
Thank you for everyone's input and advice.
Cheers,
-Win
George wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Win, Don't take that personally. I also have a curious academic mind, and enjoyed reading your summary. I would have looked for exactly the same type of thing if I was researching TS blades etc. I don't have anything to add to the discussion of stablizers, but on a related note, I have noticed that my BS noise level increased when I added a shop-made wood zero-clearance insert. Worth the noise, IMO, as I also wear hearing protection whenever using tailed tools. Thanks for your contribution, Andy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes indeed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Swingman wrote:

Woodworking. From the words "wood" and "working". Anything else you do that doesn't involve both of these isn't woodworking. That includes tool collecting, reading Krenov, reading Usenet, tidying the workshop.
We all do it, but at the end of the day, it's only actually getting out there and re-arranging wood that counts.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.