2hp on 20 amp circuit

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I'm considering a Yorkcraft 8" jointer that comes with a 2hp motor that would draw 22 full load amps at 110 volts. However all I have to run the jointer on is a 110v 20 amp circuit. I don't expect to use the jointer frequently.
Am I out of luck?
Steve
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If you don't run it frequently, you won't have to reset the breaker very often. If you manage to get it running, it may go long enough to make a pass on a short board.
BTW. 80% of the rating is considered a safe load,
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

That kind of depends on how they figured the hp. Yorkcraft may uses real hp and the motor may then actually draw 22A. My 5hp compressor has no problems, but then the rating says 15 OA. Have no idea what OA is but probably operating amperes, which makes 5 hp a lie anyway. It runs on a 20A circuit and has not problem running on a 15A circuit.
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On Fri, 06 Jan 2006 02:29:23 GMT, "George E. Cawthon"

Campbell Hausfeld ended up paying a huge class action suit for that. I got a free air nibbler out of the deal.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Right, I read about it sometime in the spring, withe the list of things you could get. Decided to wait a big and remember it about 6 days after the closing. Oh. well, I really didn't want anything they offered. Essentially all of the award went to the lawyers which is the case with all class action suits, actually it is the reason for class action suits.
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Your mileage may vary but, Generally speaking an electric motor draws the most amperage just before it stalls and during start up. If you are running the saw to its full load capacity it may not last very long and the breaker tripping may serve as an indicator that you are running at capacity although the breaker is intended to protect the wiring in your building. Most circuit breakers will allow brief periods of higher amperage before tripping. IMHO you will probably be OK. I have a compressor that runs on a 15 amp circuit and it has a 15 amp rating and I can also run a fan, and light at the same time on the same circuit. But do not continue to run the big router or the breaker will trip as the compressor nears completion of its cycle. :~)
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It is hard to say. I doubt that it will ever be under "full load" so that shouldn't be a problem. Where your problem might be is in it starting as that is when they always pull excessive current. I ran my entire shop (except for the lights) on one 20 amp circuit for years and only blew the breaker twice, both times when starting the DC while another machine was running. If this jointer is a "good deal" that is time limited, I would go for it. Is there a reason that you cannot upgrade to a higher capacity circuit?
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wrote:

Or just as easily, is there any reason why he can't run the motor on 240V? i.e. is it a convertible motor? (I'm passing the question to the OP through your post since I had already deleted the OP.)
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LRod

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I believe that the OP meant that all he has is a 20 amp 120 volt line. Jim
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Yeah, but switching a 120v line to be a 240v line is simply a new circuit breaker, a new outlet, and two pieces of black tape. A ten minute job. Increasing the amps requires running bigger wire as well as getting a new breaker and outlet.
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Unless that circuit is also feeding other receptacles, lights, etc.
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Or the panel it is running from does not have a 220V position (double slot) available.
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"Edwin Pawlowski" < snipped-for-privacy@snet.net> wrote in message
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wrote:

That is the operative question. There are a couple of options if this is a dedicated circuit with only one outlet.
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that
go
As stated by the OP above my post, he said all he had was a 110V 20A circuit and I was asking why he couldn't switch to 220V one.
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Appreciate everyone's comments. My attached garage/shop has only one 110V 20A circuit for all the outlets/lights and the breaker box is in the house's basement about 90 feet away, so I think my re-wiring options are limited and costly.
Anybody know if there's any good 1.5HP 8" jointers available? Is it worth considering replacing the Yorkcraft 8" jointer 2.0HP motor with a 1.5HP?
Steve
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Before replacing the motor, I would run it with the one it has and see what happens. In most cases, you should be fine since I believe that both my 1.5 HP dust collector and 1.5 HP table saw will use more power than your single 2HP jointer. You also might want to consider having a 60 Amp 220 line pulled into your garage and put a sub panel out there for your shop needs and leave the existing one for the lights. Then you can wire your shop to the specifics of your tools easily.
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"Steve" < snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net> wrote in message
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Steve wrote:

Rewire the motor for 220 volts, but leave it connected to 110.
I have a used table saw with a 1hp motor I have run for several years. All OK, but seemed a little underpowered. Come to find out the motor was set for 220 volts but I was running it on 110.
Low voltage (brown-out) doesn't hurt a motor unless the motor is heavily loaded. Then it draws excessive current to try and make up for the low voltage. At half the rated voltage, the motor will stall before it can hurt itself. If it were left stalled, it may get hot, but since you wouldn't leave it that way, no harm done.
Try it. It won't cost anything and I expect you won't even notice the lower power unless you do some deep cuts on wide boards. If you don't like it, you can always put it back to 110 and try something else.
Allen
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DO NOT DO THIS, unless you can carefully monitor the temperature of the motor, and preferably the current going into the motor (you have to monitor the current, because you can't monitor the temperature of the motor windings, and those can get hot very quickly, before the outside of the motor becomes dangerously high). Or unless you have a supply of free replacement motors, and enjoy exchanging them.
A fixed-frequency motor is a constant power device: It will take more current if the voltage is not sufficient, to create the power that is needed by the attached equipment; it can't reduce its speed (other than stall). So under moderate load, the motor will run at 2x the current, meaning that the motor self-heating will be 4x larger than usual. Unless you are super-careful, this can very very easily burn up the windings, even if you power the motor down when it stalls.
A better idea is actually the following: The original poster said that his garage is 90 feet from the house, and the power panel is at the house, and he has only a 20A line connecting them. I suppose that the 20A line is 12-gauge, sufficient for 20A. At the house, install a 220V circuit, and connect the line to the garage to 220V. At the garage, split the wiring up into 110V outlet/lighting circuits (preferably two separate circuits), and a 220V circuit for the power tools. Install a transformer that takes the 220V coming into the garage, and splits it back up into two 110V circuits. This will not be a small or dirt-cheap transformer, and there are difficult issues with grounding, so this installation should be left to a professional. This gives you two 20A 110V circuits (for example one each for lights and for outlets), in addition to a 20A 220V circuit for larger power tools - except that the total load is limited.
There is another idea, but I'm worried about bringing it up, as it can be extremely dangerous if implemented wrong, and I fear it could never be code compliant. If the original poster is lucky, the 20A line that goes from the house to the garage has 3 wires in it: hot (black), neutral (white), and ground (bare copper), all in an outer plastic shield (like NM or UF wire). By using generous amounts of electrical tape, one could relabel those wires to be two hot wires (black and red, using the former black and white wire), and one neutral wire (using the former bare copper ground wire). Now we have one 20A 220V, or an Edison-circuit with two 20A 110V circuits with a shared neutral, going to the garage. This circuit could then be used to feed a small breaker panel in the garage, where it could be split up for example into one 220V 20A circuit, and two 110V 20A circuits. In a nutshell this is the same proposal as installing a new subpanel in the garage and feeding it with a substantial line (for example 60A), except for using a smallish line on a piece of cable that is not intended for this usage. Small problem: The garage has no ground any more. This can be cured by creating a "made ground", meaning a few ground rounds, or (if available) a ufer in the foundation. Big problem: this is completely in violation of the code; using the bare green wire for neutral is code violating, and actually dangerous: the outer jacket of the cable is not intended as an insulator, and if anyone who doesn't know about this wire ever modifies the system in the future, death becomes very likely.
Bottom line: I would just try running the tool on the 110V 20A circuit; most likely it will work most of the time. And install a battery-powered emergency light that comes on automatically if the power fails (they are about $35 at the box stores); like this if the jointer pops the breaker, the place doesn't go completely dark. And don't forget to turn the tool off before resetting the breaker - otherwise it will start up unattended when you turn power back on. A magnetic starter might be a good investment here.
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wrote:

Then why bring it up? You're right, it is dangerous, and it does not meet Code. So what's the point in suggesting it?
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_firstname_@lr_dot_los-gatos_dot_ca.us wrote:

To a large extent what you say is correct. However, if you lower the voltage enough, the motor could never hurt itself even if stalled since it is not a PERFECT constant power device. Second, since the breaker is limiting the current to 20 amps, which would be harder on the motor - pulling 20 amps at 220 volts or 20 amps at 110 volts? (Acually, close to the same since most of the heating is due to winding resistance, thus equal current gives equal heating.)
In the case of the saw I mentioned, when it was wired for 220 volts, the lights hardly flickered when I started the saw and when nearly stalled, barely dimmed the lights. Now, wired for 110 volts, the room nearly goes dark when the saw is started and I never get close to stalling the motor under reasonably heavy load. This indicates to me that when wired for 220 volts and run on a 110 volt circuit, the motor CAN'T draw rated current, so can't hurt itself. After slogging through some long, heary rips, the motor wasn't more than warm to the touch when wired for 220.
However, if the OP can keep from blowing breakers, leave it at 110. If not, try the 220/110 approach and see if the power is adequate.
If it is just a matter of starting current, one could rig up a series resistance of some sort, like a 1500 watt heater, that was only in for starting and then a switch bypassed it once the motor was up to speed. A bit of a nusance, though.
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