24" Grizzly Planer

Someone near Mechanicsburg, PA needs to go check this out and/or bid on it. 5 Days remaining. Starting bid is $150. No one has bid, yet. http://www.govliquidation.com/auction/view?auctionIdG05116
Sonny
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wrote:

The condition, according to the web site, is listed as H7.
"H7 Unserviceable - condemned/ reparable Explanation: Material which has been determined to be unserviceable and does not meet repair criteria; Type I shelf life material that has passed the expiration date, and Type II shelf life material that has passed the expiration date and cannot be extended. NOTE: Classify obsolete and excess material to its proper condition before consigning to the DRMO. DO NOT classify material in supply condition H unless it is truly unserviceable and does not meet repair criteria. "
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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Almost all items listed on this govt site has that designation. It is unserviceable by the govt, as per their idea of unserviceable (".... does not meet repair criteria"). It may very well be serviceable by someone other than the govt. An inspection of the planer is adviseable before bidding/purchasing, to see exactly what might be wrong (if anything) with it. Even if it needs some repair (or an adjustment), which may very well be likely, it may still be worth purchasing it and repairing it.
I highly suspect the acquired value designation is incorrect, also.
Sonny
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"Sonny" wrote

manuals on line. You can talk to somebody about the machine.
I have used their big planers. They are very sturdy and HEAVY! I can not imagine much going wrong with it. A lot of folks can not do any kind of repair. I would look it over. If there is no obvious crack in the cast iron, it is probably easily repaired.
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I've lurked around here for some while and really love the NG. Knowledgeable folk and some very interesting threads. I'm from England and just looked at this thread out of curiosity. Looks a very meaty machine in decent cosmetic order but needing some repair.
This may be a dumb question but I know little of USA electrical equipment. In UK we use 240 volts @ 50hz (single phase) or 415-440 volts @ 50hz (three phase). I believe USA uses 120 volts @ 60hz single phase. Don't know about other supplies available. This machine is listed as 5hp, 1 phase, 220V, 60hz, 25 Amp. How do you get 220V, 1 phase from a 120V supply?
Also 25A is a serious loading for 1 phase supply. My Wadkin 14x12 inch planer is 3hp, 240V, 1 phase. Draws about 15A which is right on the limit for UK elec. supply. As said, probably a dumb Q and probably simple physics applies but I would be interested to know the answer. Perhaps in the terminology used <thinks>.
Many thanks, Nick.
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universally available. It is used in residential wiring for stoves and dryers. It is also commonly used in shops and garages. Commercial applications often go to triple phase wiring and different voltages, amps, etc.
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<snip>
120V is derived using a step down transformer with a center tap. Either side of the secondary coil to the center tap gives 120V. Using the two sides of the secondary coil of the transformer produces 220V.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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On 9/7/11 11:01 AM, Nick wrote:

In layman's terms... since that's what I is :-) ..... A 110 circuit uses 3 wires: a hot(black), neutral(white) and ground(bare/green). The ground is there for safety. The current travels from 1 breaker, through the black and returns through the white. A 220 circuit uses 4 wires: 2 hot (black or black and red), neutral(white) and ground(bare/green). The current travels from 2 breakers through 2 hot wires (one per breaker) and returns through the shared neutral(white) wire. The reason they can use the same neutral is because of alternating current: each hot wire is out of phase with the other and they each are hot on alternating cycles (hertz). Since this is a parallel circuit, the two 110 volt circuits become 220volts, together.
25amps isn't a problem at all, as long as your breaker is rated that high and your wire is a big enough gauge.
I'm sure the semantics police will enter forthwith to correct me and warm that you will burn your house down by even reading what I've written. :-)
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On 9/7/2011 10:01 AM, Nick wrote: ...

US single-phase distribution to residential areas is from a center-tap transformer that supplies 240V (two legs of same supply voltage 180 out of phase w/ each other). Hence the 120V is derived one side to neutral rather than 240V derived from 120V.
So, our 120V "looks like" your 240V whereas our 240V is two 120V supplies one of which is the mirror (negative) image of the other visually if one were to draw the voltage waveforms.
Historically the US used the lower voltage and has kept it for residential appliances--it does make for higher currents than the alternative but it is so ingrained now that changing over is simply not in the cards.
--
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scott
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