1/2" shank pattern bits with short cutting lengths?

Does anyone know if there are pattern bits available with a 1/2" shank that have shorter cutting lengths? All of the "standard" bit manufacturers seem to start their cutting lengths at 1" for the 1/2" shanks. Unfortunately, this won't do for my project as my template is 1/2" and I need to route out less than 1/2" from the work piece. I would like to stick with 1/2" shanks if possible, to avoid having to change my collet and because 1/2" shanks are sturdier.
I did find one set from Pat Warner, but the set is spendy and I really only need one bit (I already have longer pattern bits)
Thanks, Mark
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Mark wrote:

Surely there are, but ottomh I don't have a specific vendor.
Why not just add a spacer between the template and the workpiece?
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A spacer is a decent plan B, but I would like to avoid it if I can. The reason is that I will be template routing two sides of the workpiece in order to create a fancy tenon for a slip mortise. For this to work, the template must be in exactly the same place on both sides of the workpiece, which is much easier to line up without a spacer.
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Mark wrote:

No more difficult if the spacer is affixed permanently to the template. Actually, what I probably would do would be to use the template to cut the spacer to in essence make a thicker template.
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Hmm, are the edges of the tenon undercut?
Then I understand your difficulty and using the template to make a thicker template, or a custom shim seems to be the way to go.
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I had a similar problem and solved it with a hinge template bit. I bought it at my local Rockler and it's similar to this one except it has the top bearing on the 1/4" shank. I didn't find the exact one on their website. http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?Offerings_IDd&TabSelect tails
Art

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Mark,
What type of collet is it? ER by any chance? If so, probably ER20?
Collets are around $30... Might pay to get a collet rather than new bits... Maybe?
Regards, Joe Agro, Jr. (800) 871-5022 01.908.542.0244 Automatic / Pneumatic Drills: http://www.AutoDrill.com Multiple Spindle Drills: http://www.Multi-Drill.com
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I actually already have a 1/4" collet for my handheld router. I simply wanted to stick to 1/2" shank bits if possible, as I find them to be a little more sturdy.
Thanks for all the advice. I think I will likely use a 1/4" shank bit with a different collet, rather than creating a thicker template.
Mark
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Hey, Joe...wrong sort of collet...as far as I know, there are no routers that use ER-xx collets. I think that all router makers use proprietary collets...could be mistaken on that, tho.
Mike
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I always thought that too, but a sign manufacturer next to our shop has a big router table he uses on everything from woods and plastics to aluminum... And it has an ER32 collet system. Kinda cool...
But when he said 1/2" shank, I figured it might just be ER20 since their maximum holding size is 1/2" or 13mm
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Joe Agro, Jr.
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Now THAT would be router that I'd love to play with.
Mike
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Freud has one that starts at 1/2" long with 1/2" shank.
http://www.freudtools.com/p-128-bearing-flush-trim-bits.aspx
Mark wrote:

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I'm not sure I understand the problem.
There are two types of pattern bits, those with the bearing at the top near the collet and those with the bearing on the tip.
The top bearing bits can be used to route a thin workpiece on a router table by putting the pattern UNDER the workpiece. on top of the pattern on TOP of the workpiece. The extra cutting length extends above the workpiece. OR the same bit can be used with a hand-held router to route a thin workpiece under the template by putting a suitably thick piece of sacrificial material under the workpiece. Though sacrificial, the 'shim' could probably be reused many times.
The type with the bearing on the tip could be used on a router table by putting the pattern on top of the workpiece and with a hand router by putting the pattern below, using a shim if the bearing rubs on the worktop.
In both cases using the shortest bit that will do the job will help with accuracy and safety.
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