Worktop Jig

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After reading posts regarding worktops I thought this might be of interest for some in this ng.
Anyone have any info regarding the following site service/quality/delivery etc.
http://www.silverlinetools.com/index.html?codec3488
CODE     DESCRIPTION     PACK    PRICE
633488     900MM WORKTOP JIG    1    28.00
Compared with prices at other sites I think this might be a good deal.
Thought's ?
ATB
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On Sun, 28 Dec 2003 13:48:44 +0000, Hammer Chewer

It appears to have peg positions in the places that it should, although it's hard to work out whether it is able to do 45 degree joints. These would be needed to fit an appliance or sink across a corner. It does say that it does corner joints, though, so I would assume that that's what this is.
It also appears to be made from laminated fibreboard, of which I believe Tufnol is the common brand name.
It's difficult to know exactly what a jig can do without looking at the instructions. I think that at that price, I would be inclined to get one, look at it and if it is not suitable, send it back. It's about a third of the price of most others that I've seen.
.andy
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Andy Hall wrote:

Andy, I'd be surprised if it were Tufnol as this stuff costs an arm and a leg (plus Vat!). I guess MDF could be described as laminated as when it splits it seems to do so into layers.
Bob
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On Sun, 28 Dec 2003 14:35:19 +0000, Bob Minchin

Fair point, although it does say "high density" - whatever that means.
Even so, as long as it is accurately made to begin with, even if it does only last for the duration of a DIY kitchen job, that's fair value for money.

.andy
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wrote:

We use mdf jigs for router applications and they last very well. Usual trouble is them getting nicked with the router bit.
Paul Mc Cann
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Doesn't sound like Tufnol to me, more like plastic faced chipboard or MDF. This could explain the price as Tufnol (as used in the 100 jobs) is quite pricy. For "amateur" use I guess cheaper material would be OK as long as it is a hard laminate (formica type) but I'd be concerned about the durability of ordinary "kitchen cabinet" board.
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wrote:

Um, from their account page:
SILVERLINE TOOLS LIMITED SUPPLIES RETAILERS ONLY. WE DO NOT SUPPLY END USERS DIRECTLY.
I was about to buy one of these jigs, and it appears that I can't.
PoP
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On Sun, 28 Dec 2003 14:04:45 +0000, Andy Hall wrote:

The necessary gear to make a proper corner joint is coming down all the while. Since this is Silverline I expect that s/fix will be offering it soon. I would perhaps use this about twice a year. Now there is a sub 100 1/2" router from s/fix the total kit should be around 200 quid (with the biscuits, the clamps, bits etc.).
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On Sun, 28 Dec 2003 22:06:48 +0000, "Ed Sirett"

"laminated fibreboard" is MDF.

I wouldn't feed a worktop into a sub-100 router. It's a heavy cut on a long cutter. Doing a good job needs rigidity, and that's just what the big, cheap routers are lacking.
If you're working commercially, you can afford 170(ish) on a decent router, like the Freud 2000.
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On Mon, 29 Dec 2003 16:00:22 +0000, Andy Dingley wrote:

I guess if I'm going to tool up for corner joints than the extra 70 quid would be worth it. The previous prices of 1/2" routers were all around 250+ mark.
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On Mon, 29 Dec 2003 21:39:28 +0000, "Ed Sirett"

I think so. I've just been cutting some beech worktops for my office with my DeWalt 625. This is their incantation of the well-respected Elu of a few years ago. It is quite similar to the Trend T9 in a lot of ways and also to the CMT 1850 - I believe that they are all made in the same factory in Italy.
I used a postform jig to cut two lengths of worktop with angled ends plus a straight section to go between them to form a corner section and then a triangular piece to complete the corner at the back.
The idea is that I can fit a 21" monitor up into the corner of the room and have a good keyboard and work space in front of it - all ergonomically designed.
I also cut a number of holes for cable tidy fittings.
There was a lot of jig work in all of this - I cut dumbell holes for fixing bolts as well. Added to this, the room is not quite square, so some scribing work was also needed.
The job went well and easily - I was comfortably cutting the material at around 8mm of depth at a time with 12mm and 12.7mm TC cutters.
The machines mentioned are all 1800W types with soft start. On a large machine this is a help to reduce the tendency of the body to rotate.
The Freud machine has been well reviewed and I have been considering getting one to fit permanently in my router table. Screwfix have them for 165 inc. at present. However, I've just noticed that there are several places in the U.S. with them at $200 so I might pick one up on my next trip - 120 is a very good price for this.
.andy
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wrote:

Won't you get hit with import tax as you bring it thru customs?
PoP
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On Tue, 30 Dec 2003 06:38:25 +0000, PoP wrote:

Buy some cheap timber and use it out there throw away the box and it's "2nd hand"...
I'd have thought the voltage would have been more of a problem unless Andy already has a suitable source of 110v...
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On Tue, 30 Dec 2003 10:24:20 +0000 (GMT), "Dave Liquorice"

That's a good idea. I have a collegue who does woodwork, so that would be easy to arrange. I suppose that you would have to convince them that these are tools of the trade.
Even so, I suspect that a zealous customs officer might decide to ask for a receipt.
On one occasion, one asked to look at my notebook PC. I didn't have the invoice with me so they examined the machine. On discovering that it said IBM and Greenock on the label, they let it go. The UK keyboard was a clue as well.

I do. A yellow site transformer at about 40 does the trick well. I have numerous 110v tools that I've acquired over the years, including various cordless ones as well as corded. The largest is a small DeWalt table saw which I imported, a) because it was significantly less expensive than here, b) because the US model will take a stacked dado set. It runs quite well with this arrangement.
I also fixed up a 110v power distribution arrangement in the workshop using Commando (EN 60309) yellow plugs and sockets. Basically, the transformer sits in one corner and has a lead connecting to a male wall mounted plug. This is then cabled in the trunking (using thick singles) to numerous Commando sockets.
On tools with power cords, I've replaced the flat pinned U.S. plugs with Commando types. For the chargers, I bought the best outlet strip that I could find in the U.S. to at least get decent connectors, then I put a Commando plug on that.
.andy
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On Tue, 30 Dec 2003 12:33:10 +0000, Andy Hall wrote:

Not my idea, a nice customs man at Exter Airport... Coming back from the channel islands with a 700 radio scanner many moons ago:
"Anything to declare?" "Yes, this scanner" "How much was it?" "700" "Thats a lot for a second hand scanner" "It's not second hand, I bought it new at..." "Thats a lot for a second hand scanner" "Yes it is isn't it? But they are very good" "On your way".
Or a converstaion very similar to that. Mind you being the last flight in on a wet and stormy night might have had something to do with it as well. B-)
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Dave Liquorice wrote:

Yes, being correct and accurate can cause p[roblems for the poor old boys.
Once, I was doing some work in France, and had a computer with me. So I got a carnet, where you declare the bloody thing at every border. And get a stamp for it.
I went after france to my sisters in Germany, then up to see a friend in Denmark, before taking teh ferry back from Denmark.
About 9 months l;ater I got a strange letter in Danish from teh customs at teh german border. I assumed that they were windereing where I and my computer was.
I photocopied the exit page of the carnet that I go at teh ferry port, and sent it to them.
I heard nothing more.
Another time I upset Dover customs hugely whn I tried to declare a couple of Kilos of german sauasages.
Mind you, a bloke I know took out a broken telequipment 'scope, and returned with a brand new HP spectrum analyser bought in germany, in the boot. The carnet said 'oscilloscope' on it :-)
Thank god for teh EU.
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wrote:

Many years ago when I worked at Mullards in the electronic maintenance department on shift work the done thing was to bring in a "stereo amplifier" or something like it which you wanted to fix during the evening hours, collect a docket at the gatehouse on the way in, then take your stereo amplifier back out once it had been repaired.
What actually happened was that you took in any old scrappy piece of kit that looked something like a stereo amplifier, then throw that away once you got inside with the docket. When you eventually walked out with the stereo amplifier and showed the docket at the gatehouse the security people were happy.
But the amplifier you were taking out was built in works time from components kindly provided from the Mullards spares cupboard..... ;)
I didn't partake in this activity of course.
Those were real fun days - about a dozen guys on each shift all doing "homers", fixing TVs for shop floor staff, the lot. One of the fondest memories I have of that time was that once 5pm came and the day staff went home out would come the card table and we'd spend the next few hours playing 3 card brag.
Occasionally we used to do a bit of work for Mullards as well, when the shop floor staff phoned in a job because something on the production line had broken down.
PoP
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wrote:

So how many OC71s in parallel did it take to make a power amp?
.andy
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wrote:

Hell, back then I might have been able to tell you, but nowadays.....
Besides, I worked on the diode quality line - zener diodes and all that. BZX61's ring a bell in my memory archives, though they might be ordinary diodes.
PoP
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[54 lines snipped]

Hmmm. Having been stuck in commercial customs at Dover for some hours because we had a computer on a carnet in the boot of the car, I'm inclined to disagree. We only got away when I said I was going to unload it on the dockside and drive off and leave it.
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