Stainless steel sink - cleaning

I've only had the new Franke sink a few months and now it's starting to get a light tan hue from tea stains.
So far I've bought Inox Creme ('the best care for every stainless steel sink from Franke') but it is a gentle cream and just gives a brilliant shine without removing stains. "Shiny Sinks" was sold to me by the local diy shop but on my return home I decided it was too harsh and would not do. Now I'm stuck as to what to use. Any ideas?
Thanks very much.
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Don't throw tea bags in the sink?
You'll need something mildly abrasive to clear out the marks. Proper cream cleaner?
Christian.
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Ed wrote:

Caustic soda, 'Mr Muscle' oven cleaner, or, if you are a wuss, plain bleach.
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Julian Fowler wrote:

Then you can buff it with a buffing mop and T-cut :-)

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The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Solvol Autosol (if you can still get it) is much better for SS than T-Cut.
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parish wrote:

I haven't heard that name in years...I suspect you are completely right :-)
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Ed wrote:

Bleach, or a cleaner containing bleach such as Flash Kitchen Spray. We use the latter to remove the tea stains from the worktop, sink, and even the inside of cups.

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parish <parish_AT_ntlworld.com> wrote:

Of course it doesn't actually *remove* the stains, it just renders them invisible (though if you're being pedantic I suppose a stain is only a stain if it's visible). I discoverd this when I used bleach on some photographic developer stains many years ago, they disappeared beautifully but the moment some more developer hit them they became instantly brown again.
Personally I think life's too short to want stainless steel to stay pristine on the bottom of the sink.
--
Chris Green ( snipped-for-privacy@x-1.net)

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snipped-for-privacy@isbd.co.uk wrote:

That is not *necessarily* so. Bleach and caustic soda work by chemical recations. They change the chemical composition of what they bleach. If teh end product is water souluble, it will simply wash away.
Viz a grease stain will end up as soap and be gone for ever.
The tendency of caustic is to rip other molecules apart, leaving fragmenst with various groupings on them left over. Its very rarely a reversible reaction. Well not without considerable equipment and knowledge anyway :)
Anyway I use caustic on things like stained china and steel sinks, and mainly, it's fine. I have ended up staing some things - can't recall what - but mostly its pristine woderfulness afterwards. Beware of its effects on plastc tho - can make tghe waste pipes brittle, so not to be used too often.

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Use my old granny's tried-and-tested method for removing said stains from the inside of her teapot (why did she mind about it?!) - soak in a fairly concentrated solution of clothes washing powder. Works a treat with no need for abrasives.
David
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get
Seconded.
I've used the same trick on both stainless steel teapots and sinks. A generous helping of washing powder and hot water, and leave to soak for a while. If doing this to a teapot, rinse thoroughly afterwards. And then rinse again. And again. And then vow never to clean the thing ever again because tea tastes 'orrible for ages afterwards!
On the other hand, on a sink it does a fantastic job.
Steve.
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I've got a compe white sort of sink, and the instructions say it's not the sink that stains, but limescale from water stains, and to use descaler.
I've found this works
mike r
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Descalers can mark stainless(sic) steel, something which I know first hand...
--
Andrew Gabriel

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the
An excellent descaler safe for use on stainless is "Phos" from Clover Chemicals Ltd (01663 733114), it is also food industry safe.
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I know all about that one. Fine wet and dry paper is your friend.
Christian.
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mike ring wrote:

This is often, but not always, true.

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"Ed" wrote

get
ideas?
Can't beat good old bleach. I can personally recommend a Tesco own brand - Tesco Kitchen Cleaner Plus Bleach 500ml Trigger 88p. Got it in a 2 for 1 offer with their bathroom one, not expecting much, but I'm a sucker for offers. But - it removes every kind of stain known to man, not bad on grease. Really cheap, but pongs to high heaven. Has an aura that it might be one of Mr Burns of Springfield's by-products. Bathroom one was rubbish, btw.
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get
sink
shop
I'm
An excellent metal polish I've used on brass and stainless for years is Wenol http://www.wenol.com /
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Tomato ketchup is what they use in the catering trade I believe. As for tea stains on china, try a dilute solution of Ribena overnight. I once used washing powder to clean a saw blade. It certainly got rid of the resin on the teeth but it badly pitted the metal so I don't think I'd want it in my teapot.
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