slate floor

Anyone ever lifted a slate floor ?
Any tips ?
The slates are about 2 foor 6 by 3 foot 6, so they are heavy. I am worried, will thsy still be solid, or will they split ? They have been sat "on the earth" for 100 or more years
Thanks Rick
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It was probably sat in the earth for a few thousand years before that. Slate is impervious to water (hence it use in early damp proof courses) and is supposed to a good hardwearing flooring material for both iside and out. I wouldnt expect them to fall apart just dont drop 'em. Slate can have a tendency to delaminate (is that the correct word ?) ie you can split it into layers - but youll need tools.
Andy

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wrote:

Spall is usually the word used for delamination of slate, but generally in a floor, after it has settled following the cutting to produce the tiles it doesn't.
Spalling tends to happen with roofs eventually due to alternate freeze and thaw cycles.
.andy
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Sir
Thanks for the info, spalling (now I know the correct word) was what I was worried about.
Rick

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On the subject of slate floors, we're looking at laying a slate floor in our kitchen. The kitchen measures 370cm x 245cm the trouble is it is above our cellar and currently has a wooden floor, although the joists look to be in good condition I'm a little concerned as to the weight of the slate floor. My girlfriend wants slate flag stones which are around 40" x 25" but these are around an 1" thick and weigh a ton! Would it be better to lay slate tiles as these tend to be only around 1/4" thick or would the flag stones be better as they would distribute their weight more evenly over the floors area?
Cheers
Kerry

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On Sun, 9 Nov 2003 16:22:58 -0000, "Kerry Hoskin"

I think that there are two things here.
The first is certainly the weight, the other is that the flagstones are too large for the size of room and won't look right. You would be better off with pieces of something like 600x400mm. This is a good compromise on creating the illusion of space without them being so big that you only fit three in and it looking ridiculous.
I would recommend looking at riven slates. These are approx 10-12mm thick and are machined one side and riven the other for a more natural look. You would need to lay stout plywood first (e.g. 18mm) and then lay slates on top.
Have a look at www.stonell.com for some good examples with room illustrations as well.
.andy
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Cheers I'll have a look. Being down in Cornwall we were looking at Delabole slate, I would prefer slate tiles to flag stones and I know that Delabole do packs of various sized stones.
Kerry
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On Sun, 9 Nov 2003 18:15:56 -0000, "Kerry Hoskin"

Given that, Delabole could well be a good choice and in context with the area. A large amount of the cost of slate is transportation cost, so if you can buy locally then great.
I would still err towards smaller sizes than those that you originally mentioned. I wouldn't particularly care for say 20cm square tiles either, but I think you may find that something like the 600x450 size will look good.
If you aren't certain, go to one of the places and buy about 4-5 of them and loose lay them in the area. Live with them for a few days and see what you think.

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