Replacing washing machine pump

Our washer dryer (Hoover WDM 120) stopped draining. Following previous postings here, I checked the filter and pipes for blockages. Eventually I removed the pump (well, I think it is the pump - a small motor on the back of the filter chamber. The paddles seem very small though).
There is nothing obviously wrong with the pump, but when I connected it to the mains (I was very careful:) it didn't do anything, not so much as a buzz or click. As there are only 2 connectors, I presume it should start to work when power is applied?
So, do you think a new pump will fix it? There is nothing else obviously wrong, the drum spins (after manually draining it) etc. I am just worried that the pump might have burnt out part of the controller when it failed.
The machine is a little over 2 years old, but it has been used pretty heavily. It could last a good while longer or the bearings might go next week. I am willing to take a gamble if it is just the pump, but if it is likely to be anything more serious I will probably have to cut my losses.
As you might have gathered, I am not too experienced at fixing these things. I've owned a number over the years, but they always seem to fail catastrophically so I've never attempted to fix one before.
Cheers
Dom
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You could try *CAREFULLY!* measuring the voltage on the pump when the washer is about to drain and see if there is a voltage applied here - if there is, it would indicate the controller is working
a better test would be to connect a similar load to the wires that go to the pump (after disconnecting the pump) (a light bulb for example) and see if it lights when the washer thinks it is draining!
Sparks...
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common failure - new pump 10-15 should fix it
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Yep.
Possible, but in my experience unlikely. Look for soot marks or scorching near the electronics/electrics boards.

Quantify "heavily"? Two years is brand new in my experience - some machines last for ten or fifteen years or so (depending on load of course).

Ach, you are just being pessimistic! :-)

There's a "Haynes" manual on washing machines that is probably sitting in your local library just now crying for you to borrow it...
Methinks the pump should show some resistance if you stick a multimeter across the two terminals (not connected to the machine of course).
You can then turn the multimeter to Voltage range and check that the (presumed) spade connectors on the machine do rise to 240 volts AC when the machine gets to its rinse cycle. Careful with the mains potential of course.
If it is the pump, just take it along to your local washing-machine-repair shop and part with ten or twenty quid for a new one.
HTH
Mungo
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You may well have a rights to take it back to the shop you bought it from!
(Even if it is out of warranty)
Take a gander at www.tradingstandards.gov.uk
If you were using it for commercial puropses, then this is a different case, but for domestic use (however high) you ma well be able to get it fixed free of charge
------- The Sale of Goods Act 1979 (as amended) says that goods should be: of a Satisfactory Quality, i.e. of a standard that a reasonable person would consider to be satisfactory - generally free from fault or defect, as well as being fit for their usual purpose, of a reasonable appearance and finish, safe and durable; ------ It broke pretty quickly, so I would say the item was not durable ------ fit for the purpose - As well as being fit for the purpose for which they are generally sold, goods should also be fit for any specific or particular purpose made known at the time of the agreement; ------ Well I guess you were using it for cleaning and drying fabrics, if so, it has failed to cope (If you were trying to use it as a cement mixer, then this will be different!! ------
when you buy goods from a shop, you enter into a contract under the Sale of Goods Act 1979 (as amended). This holds the shop liable for up to SIX YEARS after purchase (Limitation Act 1980), providing that you can show that the problem is down to an unreasonable fault and not normal wear and tear. Secondly, remember that the guarantee is in addition to these statutory legal rights. Don't be taken in by the shop's argument here - they are using the issue of the guarantee as a red herring to try to avoid their legal obligations toward you. See our leaflet 'Buying Goods' for more information on your rights.
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I absolutely agree, in fact this is a bit of a bee in my bonnet! Unfortunately the sale of goods act seems practically useless when it comes most household appliances. The problem is that the retailer can just refuse to do anything and it is then up to you to take them to court. Sure it is "easy" (everyone says) but it takes a while.
As I see it this leaves you with several options:
1) Do without your washing machine until the court case. Could take months. Not an option! 2) Buy a new appliance but force the retailer to fix the old one, then keep it in the garage for years as a spare. This hurts you a lot more than it hurts them, because you shelled out for a new machine. 3) Fix it at your own expense. 4) Scrap it and take the loss. Life is short, after all.
In my case I think option 3, paying 20 quid for a new pump, was the best thing to do. You have to choose your battles.
BTW, I fitted the new pump and it works! A minor achievement, but I haven't felt this smug since I grew my own radishes :)
Dom
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