Re: Tricky Heck!

Page 1 of 2  
I got an SDS recently too. One of the first jobs I did with it was sink an electrical socket in the inner leaf of a cavity wall. Using my old hammer drill, I would first pepper the area with holes and then excavate with a bolster. I've got used to the look and feel of this operation, so I no longer use a depth stop for the drilling.
With the SDS, this was the first and only time I've so far used it as a drill rather than as a chiseling tool. So I drilled my hole as usual, and after a few moments all resistance disappeared.
Oops - I'd drilled right through to the cavity, which is way, way deeper than you need to go through plaster into breeze block. And this was with a great big fat bit too.
W.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

OK, OK, I'm convinced :-)
Since moving to NE Scotland, where our walls are solid granite, drilling a hole with a standard B&D hammer drill is a joke. Presumably an SDS drill would cope, without problems?
I see that Argos list two, a Bosch PBH2200RE SDS Drill, and Challenge Pro SDS Rotary Hammer Drill Kit. Prices UKP 100 and 25 respectively. Who are Challenge? Cheap and nasty?
--
Graeme

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
writes

Steer well clear of Challenge Graeme, it isn't worth even the price they want for it. A friend got one just about a month ago and it's broken already, I think the chuck has lost its grip, and the guarantee states that, literally, it shouldn't be used to drill hard masonry. So that should tell you a bit about it.
--
BigWallop

http://basecuritysystems.no-ip.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Great, thanks. It did look too good to be true - SDS drill and various accessories for twenty five quid.
--
Graeme

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Well I can't give you a definite "yes" to that question, but believe me, the bricks on our house were hard baked, and then apparently put back in the oven with some extra hardener added.
With my B&D 650w "domestic" hammer drill, which I thought was the bees leg joints with respect to drilling holes, it would take absolutely 'kin ages to drill even a small sized hole.
With my trusty new SDS 850w drill (which I admit I bought from a local Homebase shed because I needed a drill fast - cost 79) it seems that all I have to do is make sure the bit is positioned on the right mark on the wall, squeeze the trigger for a maximum of 3 seconds, and I've got me a hole into which a rawlplug fits. And the drill bit didn't appear to wander as it made the hole either.
Now I have to admit this experience to which I relate equates to the drilling of two separate holes in the same brick. Just maybe I've picked the one brick in the whole damn house which was made of brick coloured swiss cheese - but I don't think so. The pile of brick sawdust which appeared on the floor sure as heck looked authentic to me.
Andrew
Do you need a handyman service? Check out our web site at http://www.handymac.co.uk
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The price you paid for it is about right Andrew, for a good one around the house, and should last you a good long while. We picked up two, 110v DeWalt SDS guns and I think I'd have been better with my B&Q one for the job they did. DeWalt are living on past reputation in my opinion, and they should get back to what they were good at. We ended up throwing them away and paying good money for two Bosch makes which have gone on now for the past two years, with a bit TLC and drink and a meal now and again. "You gets wot' ya pays fir" I suppose.
--
BigWallop

http://basecuritysystems.no-ip.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've had a DW 566 for some time now - and paid much more than the current price - and it's as near perfect as any power tool I possess. Perhaps they've reduced the quality as well as the price?
--
*It IS as bad as you think, and they ARE out to get you.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I think they have reduced everything Dave. The older ones we've had were great, really lived up to their reputation, that's why we went back for more after the years that the first ones lasted, but the ones we got last year were really poor in their power output. The build quality didn't feel right for an old style DeWalt, and they just sucked, really poor results with them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I know two people who have bought the Challenge one - both returned it.
I have (well, my dad has on near permenant loan at the mo :-) the Wickes small pneumatic one and it is brilliant. Only 500w but plenty powerful enough for everything we have thrown at it which includes some concrete breaking that was pretty tough :-)
Its a rebadged Kress and is just over 100 quid I think. Dunno if this is good value now - it certainly wasn't bad a few years back!
Darren
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I like the Kress make. I've had plenty of shots with them and they do "do the job" They don't cost as much as the better known brands, but they should be given what's due for their quality. Really good buy one of those.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Indeed.
The Wickes ones are even better buy - Kress quality at even less-than-Kress prices. Certainly doesn't seem any cuts made to hit the lower price...
Darren
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
writes

I bought the Bosch and I'm well pleased with it. I find the slow start is useful but others makes may have this too. It's heavier than my old B&D hammer but has two handles so overall I find it better to work with. It's reversible so I even used it as a screwdriver when flooring the loft.
Andrew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I spend a happy half hour when I got my SDS drill, turning a stone from the rockery into swiss cheese. It was just so much fun to have somthing that goes through ANYTHING.
-- Tony Collins
message

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I keep reading all these mentions of SDS drills and I still don't know how an SDS drill is different from my elderly B&D Hammer thingy. Can someone please enlighten me of the ways in which SDS differs...
--
dave @ stejonda

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

SDS bits have channels in the side. You insert the bit into the drill by simple pushing it into the chuck while holding a collar back. The channels hold the drill very firmly so it doesn't slip. However, the bit is able to slide up and down in the chuck a fair amount, even if it can't slip sideways. The hammer action works by literally hammering the end of the bit, which is very effective because the sliding action means that the chuck can remain firmly attached to the motor whilst the bit flies forwards and backwards. A traditional "hammer" drill can't do this because the bit is firmly attached to the chuck, so it just wobbles it a bit from side to side, which is totally pants in comparison.
Because the hammer action really does hammer the bit (quite hard if you push it) and is independent of the rotation action, it is usally possible to turn rotation off and put a chisel bit it. This produces a very useful demolition and chasing device!
Christian.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

<snip>
Many thanks Christian.
--
dave @ stejonda

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

On my normal hammer drill, the whole chuck assembly goes in and out.
I reckon SDS works better in 3 ways:-
The lower mass of the drill against a drill/chuck combination makes the impact greater even if the 'hammer' were the same. The impact mechanism is better - a hammer drill uses a ramp mechanism, and there's a limit to the acceleration that can be achieved. IIRC, SDS uses a pneumatic system. The SDS bit can't slip even slightly in a rotary direction.
Feel free to add or subtract. ;-)
--
*Before they invented drawing boards, what did they go back to?

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Excellent point. Had to laugh at yet more powerful, sorry yet more cells, 30V cordless keyless chuck drill being demoed live on QVC a week or so ago. Couldn't drill the concrete or cast iron because the bit kept sticking even after attempt at really tightening chuck. Quick cut to VT. A mid-range SDS drill can be had for about the same cost.
Alan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
London SW 12

--
BigWallop

http://basecuritysystems.no-ip.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I always start with hammer off. If you hit mortar (particularly lime mortar) with SDS hammer on, you end up with a hole 3 times broader and 10 times deeper than you intended in less than a millisecond ;-)
Also, I've had the occasional soft brick which drills fine without hammer, but shatters to a thousand pieces if an SDS hammer drill bit touches it.
--
Andrew Gabriel

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.