Petrol in Diesel Engine

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al wrote:

The 206 GTI ad with the people with creases in the back of their shirts is called 'play away from home' and the music is from the film soundtrack to '28 days later' called 'In the house - In a heartbeat' Quite dark, chilling, slightly deranged.
Toby.
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(MartinC)

Yes I really hated having to get in the Q for the one diesel pump behind a lot of petrol-heads who could get in any Q.
But fortunately it's not like that anymore
Tim

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The smaller unleaded opening on newer cars will not accept a diesel nozzle without significant difficulties, however it's really easy to fill a diesel with unleaded! The differences in colour coding adopted by the oil companies adds to the confusion. It needs a standard colour scheme world wide.
As for daft, how about calling standard unleaded 95 ron "Premium" and high octane 97 ron "Super" unleaded! Most people regard "Premium" as better than "Super" but at least the only harm you can do is waste money.
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They have. Unleaded nozzles are narrower with knobled ends. It is not possible to put a diesel nozzle into a petrol car's hole (except for ancient cars originally sold for leaded).
It is possible to put petrol in a diesel, but it probably doesn't matter so much, as discusssed here...
Christian.
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MartinC Wrote:

I did it yesterday - put about 4 gallons of unleaded into my LDV20 (sherpa) and topped up with about 3 gallons of diesel. There wa probably 2-3 gallons already in. OK for a few miles then very slow an smoky in 1st and 2nd, better in 3rd and 4th - not chanced 5th! Been trying to find out if adding engine oil, or some form of pur mineral oil (or olive oil a la biodiesel) would help lube the pumps an make the mix more diesel-like, and if so in what ratio to the petrol? Worried
-- elgorrion
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On Sun, 4 Sep 2005 16:38:23 +0100, elgorrion

2 Possibilities.
1) The performance deteriorated as the diesel fuel in the lines and filters got replaced by petrol/diesel mixture which did not burn as predicted in the design of the engine causing pre-ignition, detonation, or whatever.
2) The performance deteriorated because the petrol in the mix had damaged the pump/injectors.
:(

FWIU in summer, the cheapest veg oil is more or less equivalent to diesel, at least as far as half a tank goes. Proprietory motor oil includes additives that might not agree with seals in the fuel system.
If there's room in the tank why not add more diesel, (Why start experimenting with veg oil at a time like this?).
Better still, try and make room in the tank by removing all but half a gallon or so of contaminated fuel, (To avoid getting air in the fuel system) then filling right up with diesel. If you are parsimonious the fuel so removed could be used over time at a rate of say a gallon/tankful.
Intuitively I'd expect it to cause less damage if it was left ticking over whilst it purged the contaminated fuel from the lines/filters etc. rather than thrashed down the Motorway. ;-)

Let us know how you get on.
DG
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wrote:

It was (still is?) common practice to put upto 30% petrol in diesel cars to stop waxing in very cold weather. Isn't this what winter diesel is anyway?
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On Sun, 04 Sep 2005 22:12:40 +0100, dennis@home

It was normally paraffin used for wax-proofing diesel and the Excisemen could be very cross with you for this. Another genius method was to light a fire under the fuel tank of a truck. Winter diesel is normally a lower-boiling cut of the distillate which does not particularly carry the alkanes present in petrol, more paraffin sized ones. In fact chromatograms of distillate fuels show a characteristic bell-curve shape across the peaks as in
http://www.sge.com/pdfs_local/applications/gc%20columns/GC%20Data%20Base/Petroleum/PET%2006.pdf
the Winter diesel I worked with carried a double peak, suggesting strongly that it was a blend of two distillates, one being in the standard diesel range of carbon numbers, and the other being slightly on the heavy side of paraffin.
John Schmitt
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Did you know that contaminated fuel like this is Free All you need do is replace your engine with a Rolls-Royce K60 :-)
-
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elgorrion wrote:

10% in a rugged old Sherpa? It'll be fine.
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Steve Walker wrote:

4 gallons out of 10 in total sounds more like 40% to me ;-)
--
Cheers,

John.

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John Rumm wrote:

I'd add a gallon of cheap 20-50 to rebalance the mix meself...
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Steve Walker wrote:

I'd say so as well Just keep topping up with diesel till she runs adequately, then run her to nearly empty.
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