Internal door - what wood

I need to make a non-standard sized internal door (just a frame with two large glass panels).
I can go to my local B&Q/Homebase and buy the right cross-section softwood, but as it dries out it may warp.
Thus, should I go for a hardwood - or treated softwood - or what?
TIA -Steve
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I don;t think the likelihood of warping is related directly to whether it's hardwood or softwood, it's more related to how well seasoned it is. I would think that your answer lies in finding a good timber merchant who will be able to sell you material that won't warp, or at least will warp only to an acceptable degree.
I suspect also that much of the skill in designing and making a door lies in making it so that any warping will not affect the door too much.
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The sheds only sell low grade wood, which is mostly warped before you start. Go to a good timber merchant who would also be able to advise you on the best type.
Phil
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If it was "warped before you start" then you'd be alright, that's really what seasoned wood is (though of course you should really season it before cutting it up!).
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Steve wrote:

It will warp, especially from B&Q,.,.

Go to a decent timber merchant and get good quality quarter sawn wood with no visible warps in it. Iroco is popular, but decent pine (parana?) should also be good.

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What do you mean - 'may' ;-)
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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On Mon, 17 Nov 2003 23:04:11 +0000 (GMT), Dave Plowman

Yes, but the OP will be okay if he also buys the timber frame from B&Q. That way they will warp in harmony.
PoP
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You could by a standard door and cut it down. That is what some joiners shops would do. All the rebates are cut and all you have to do is make sure the section is joined together OK. Simple lap joints will do.
Why are you putting glass in it, the door will weigh a ton as you need reinforced glass. Will it need to be fire proof?
What used to let doors down some time ago was the technique of using dowels instead of motice joints. I don't know if the method is still in use these days. There was almost no strain support in the design. As for treating the wood, most of these B&Q type places have overdry timber. If your house is not som dehumidified as those places you will get some expansion. Look out for clean knot free timber that is straight grained and store it (under a bed?) out of the way somewhere flat until it takes on the moisture it will be used in, or just get on with it and be prepared to fettle it a little afterwards.
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Hello Michael

Those with large inset panels, or an overskin of mdf are generally Ok - those big panels make for a self-supporting frame.
I make a lot of simple rough stable doors - just a 4' square of 18mm ply with an inner square frame of 1.5"x3.5" tanalised softwood nailed onto it - no diagonals. They never drop until the wood rots out. The ply takes care of the stress and strain, and the softwood gives it some rigidity and also gives enough bulk to put the fittings on.
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Simon Avery, Dartmoor, UK
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