How are jigsaw puzzles mass produced

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My wife has been doing a tricky 1000 piece jigsaw puzzle, and roped me in to help. While pondering the differing pieces I wondered how they are mas produced. Do they have a series of wiggly guillotine blades to first cut in one direction, and then rotate through 90 degrees and repeat? If so how are the blades made?
Someone must know!! HowStuffWorks was no help.
phil
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to
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I imagine they are stamped in one go.
Si
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On Mon, 29 Sep 2003 16:25:53 +0100, "Mungo \"two sheds\" Toadfoot"

... but with what?
phil
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Phil Addison wrote:

Big press and hardened steel blades.

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What he said.
:o)
Si
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wrote:

If you look at a puzzle piece you will see that one face is indented slightly. This is the face the stamper hit (usually the picture face). This means you need one stamp for each size of puzzle, regardless of picture and is far quicker than using a jigsaw or scroll saw as was originally done.
Peter
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Peter Ashby
School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Scotland
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Mungo \"two sheds\" Toadfoot wrote:

The cardboard ones are definitely die cut.
Plywood ones are sawn on a bandsaw I think. Much more expensive.

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Plywood jigsaws? Never seen those. Must come from a poor family. :(
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Suz wrote:

I haven't even DONE a jigsaw in over 20 years.
The better ones of my youth were 3/16" ply.
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Looks like you want one of these....
http://www.puzzlemachine.com /
Found it through a link in the forum of http://www.jigsawpuzzles.com
cheers Richard -- Richard Sampson
email me at richard at olifant d-ot co do-t uk
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No, just curious - and at nearly $17,000 to get a 500 piece machine, its just as well. Our puzzle is 1000 pieces.

OK, so it *is* all stamped out in one go. Nice video, but shame the cutter is not very clear. Next question - how do they make and assemble the cutter blades.
phil
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Phil Addison wrote:

Looks a bit like a blind pastry cutter. I presume you could machine one from solid on a CNC end mill, or perhaps start from an casting of some sort if you were making lots of cutters.
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Cheers,

John.

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John Rumm wrote:

You could even spot weld some pressed crinkled steel sheet to a flat plate. and grind it flat I suspect.
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On Mon, 29 Sep 2003 16:47:28 GMT, "Phil Addison"

One of the first large markets for laser cutting was to make this sort of tooling. You cut narrow slots in plywood, then fill them with "razor blade on a roll"
-- Smert' spamionam
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wrote:

Fascinating.
How long does it last?
In my experience razor blades only last for one shave. But there again, Spouse has only shaved once in thirty odd years. That was last year and it was such a terrible experience for both of us that he threw away the razor, a modern ones, not a 30yo one!
Mary

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On Mon, 29 Sep 2003 15:23:13 GMT, "Phil Addison"

Crosland Cutters, it's an oldish site, so some of the details may have changed: http://www.croslandcutters.co.uk/products.htm
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On Mon, 29 Sep 2003 15:23:13 GMT, "Phil Addison"

Well, aside from the ways it has been done to date (saws and dies, depending on age/materials), I'd imagine laser is going to feature in the future, and once it does, then the door will be open for some fiendish new patterns in the cut to be used, and irregular variations, which could make them even more challenging! Having said this, the die on card gives a nice curved bevel edge and this must ease fitting parts together, and laser probably could not reproduce that, mind you used on the right materials, who knows.
Take Care, Gnube {too thick for linux}
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wrote:

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I've seen some very intricate patterns cut into plastics and steel using a laser, and very quickly too. Laser's even keep the Internet running at high speeds. Laser's are now used for many, many, many types of cutting, measuring, spying, welding, etc. etc. ad infinitum, and it wouldn't surprise me if the backing board for the jigsaw puzzle in question was actually cut using a laser, then had the picture pasted to it.
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wrote:

+0100
    http://www.puzzlemachine.com /.
That is obviously how the puzzles are made. What 'puzzles' me now is how is the crossed over cutter die made. Flexi-razor blades in a wiggly slot won't do it because of the cross-overs. It has to be a non-flexible material with slots cut in it to allow the 90 degree blades to fit.
-- Phil Addison The uk.d-i-y FAQ is at http://www.diyfaq.org.uk / Remove NOSPAM from address to reply
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In uk.d-i-y, Phil Addison wrote:

Are you sure it's a crossed-over die? I'd be tempted to use a simple parallel-wiggly-line die repeatedly.
--
Mike Barnes

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