shower diverter


Hello...hope someone has an idea that might be helpful....
I just bought a new home. My master bath has the shower head, cold faucet knob, hot faucet knob, diverter knob in between the H&C knobs, and one outlet faucet at the bottom.
When we moved in, the diverter didn't send the hot water fully through to the shower head; as such, we had cold showers, but hot feet, as the hot water came out the lower faucet.
We had a plumber from our home warranty contractor come out and fix it somewhat. Problem is, it still does have some water coming out (but not the full on flow) from the bottom faucet - both hot and cold water. The plumber told us that since we are on well water, this would likely be an issue forever due to lower water pressure.
Is the plumber full of it and trying to avoid more costly and time consuming repairs that they won't get "paid" for (under warranty), or is he right?
Also, if the plumber was correct and I'll just have to live with the dripping, would it be possible for me to get a new outlet faucet with a diverter "pull up thingy" that will block the flow of water, even if it doesn't redirect it to the showerhead?
Thanks in advance for any advice,
Chris O
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this is by design on some valves. IE symmons s-96

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The dripping prevents vacuum lock which could prevent the valve from automatically opening when you turn off the water. You can certainly go to a hardware store, buy a new spigot, and screw it in place of the old one but it will work the same.
What I don't get is why you have a diverter valve knob AND a diverter pullup on the tub faucet. Did the plumber change out the whole setup for a single knob type pressure balanced valve or did he just clean the valves and replace the carterages in the existing fixture?
The plumber saw your setup not me so I won't say he was wrong. Decreased pressure may cause incomplete closure of such a popup diverter but it depends on how much drip you are talking about and that info I lack.
If you don't like the way your valve works there are better alternatives but it won't be covered in your warranty.

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tell us what kind of valves. you might ber able to take dirverter apart and clean it out. there might be a piece of solder or something in it. it sounds like you have seperate valves for each function they are all the same. the dirverter valve is prob not going all the way in one direction, hot water gets out first in a pressure drop equal chance situation im pretty sure.

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A spout diverter is supposed to drip, a knob diverter should not drip. If the stem and washer are new, the valve seat may be worn or damaged or there may be another o ring or there may be rust or solder debris lodged in a hard to flush location. Make sure he replaced the parts not just pop a few o-rings in and say it should be good enough.
Since you are dealing with a home warranty, you can try and say the repair was unsatisfactory due to internal damage or wear and request a new fixture but it will be a tough battle - read your policy to see if it is even covered to that extent, there may be exceptions.
I'd probably be happy with what I got for my $10 co-pay and plan to upgrade the fixture later.

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Now I get it, you want to know if you just stop using the knob diverter and use a pullup spout instead will that help. Probably dribble less than you described and probably get a better mixing. Just plug up the existing spout with your finger and see if the shower runs with good temp mixing, if it does, the pullup may just work pretty well compared to the alternative.
If you can pull a spout you should also be able to handle pulling the core out of the diverter, turn on the water and flush the valve from the front, reassemble and see if it works better.

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"Chris O"
Touche'
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Touche'...Touche' why Touche' I am sorry but I don't understand the use of that word here. dont you mean NP or your welcome?

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"Ned Flanders"

If I meant it, I'd have written "you're welcome." I typed "touche'" since this fellow picked up on Blackbeard's gentle vocabulary. I picked up on Blackbeard's $400-$800 price for replacing a tub valve.
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Chris O wrote:

I'm no lawyer, and never even played one on TV, but it seems to me that if by "new home" you mean that you bought a BRAND NEW home, you've got a right to expect what an average person would consider "normal" performnce from something as commonplace as a diverting tub/shower setup. And, there are certainly ones which don't give a fig about lower water presures. The builder should be responsible for correcting the problem even if it means having to tear things out and installing a better diverter valve.
I don't know what your words "some water" mean with respect to what's coming out of the tub spout (I expect that's the thing you are calling an "outlet faucet") but if it's anything more than a dribble then the diverter valve isn't working as well as a "proper one" could.
If it isn't a brand new house, then you'll likely have a problem convincing the warranty guys to install something new which works better that what's in there now - - - unless maybe you can show them an identical brand/model diverter in another location which is doing its thing much better than yours does, and ask them to explain why they can't fix or replace yours so it works as well as the one you just showed them. (Good luck with that...)
I wouldn't try adding a spout with a built in "pull up" diverter valve to your setup. Depending on the "dribble rate you're getting now, you'd have to hold the pull knob up for quite a while before the pipe and spout filled enough to keep the spout valve closed by itself.
HTH,
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
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No, no, no! :) "New" to me home. The house is 26 years old.

Yeah, that thing!
but if it's anything more than a dribble then the

It will fill up a 12 oz cup within 20 seconds or so. If it continues to be a pain in my arse, I might just try to buy a new spout for a few bucks with a diverter pull up.
Thanks for your feedback!
chris

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Thanks everyone for your help. I think the best thing for me to do right now is to simply wait a few weeks. Long story short, the EPA is hooking my neghborhood up to public water later this month at no cost to the homeowners. Hopefully, with no longer being on well water, the water pressure will improve, perhaps eliminating the "low water pressure" problem the plumber cited as being the reason the spout still runs. If it continues, I'll be back in September for more help!
Thanks again,
chris

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