Three-Handle Shower Diverter Valve Removal

Do I need to shut off the water supply before removing just the diverter valve in a three-handle shower installation? Or can I just leave the hot and cold faucets turned off and pull the diverter?
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On Wednesday, January 2, 2019 at 11:10:34 AM UTC-5, Wade Garrett wrote:

No need to shut off the main valve. The diverter is after the hot and cold shower valves.
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On 1/2/2019 11:10 AM, Wade Garrett wrote:

Are you referring to the main? If yes, then no. All you need to do is turn off the hot and cold valves on the lines to the shower. If that's what you were referring, then yes.
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On 1/2/19 12:40 PM, Meanie wrote:

Right, there's no water cutoff just for the tub so I'd need to shut the main for the whole house. I'd like to avoid that if possible because I'm thinking it's going to take a while to come up with a new diverter.
Best case would be a quick hit at Home Depot/Lowe's- but it's a real old dog and I expect to be trucking it around town to plumbing supply places. Kind of a pain having no water for an extended period of time...
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On Wednesday, January 2, 2019 at 1:17:48 PM UTC-5, Wade Garrett wrote:

agedy

If it's very old, I'd take into account that you might wind up replacing the whole faucet assembly, for various reasons. If you have access from behind, that may be bad, but not horrific. If you don't, then it's really,really bad.
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On 1/2/2019 1:17 PM, Wade Garrett wrote:

Follow the pipes from the tub as far back to determine if there are shut off valves on those single lines. If not, then you're only choice is to shut off from the main, unless by chance, there are valves that shut off sections which the tub may be a part. If you need to use the main and plan to have it off for an extended period of time, then I suggest you use this opportunity to install valves on each pipe (hot and cold) to the tub, then turn on the main with the two new valves both turned off to do your replacement/repair.
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On 1/2/19 4:13 PM, Meanie wrote:

Cutoff valves are a good suggestion!
Unfortunately though, the fiberglass one-piece tub/shower enclosure water supply pipes go down to a really nasty and very difficult to access dirt crawl space. The floor joists and pipes there vary from about two to 14 feet above the hard-pack dirt.
If it comes to valve installation, it's going to be 1-800-PLUMBER ;-)
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On Wednesday, January 2, 2019 at 7:07:03 PM UTC-5, Wade Garrett wrote:

There is no need to shut off the main if all he's working on is the diverter valve. The diverter is AFTER the two faucet valves.
unless by chance, there are valves that shut off

Just sounds like extra work for little gain to me.
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