Zennis diasppointing

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Never had, used, owned, or had a GPS device in my hand, much less used one.
Now, I'll go back to scraping spiders off the ceiling. Have we had our pills, yet?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
You can get a Garmin with a 5 inch screen for maybe $100 and about $30 more for lifetime maps and traffic.
Once you set the gps, you need not look at it since it talks to you.
Hope I'm not telling you something you don't already know.
If you constantly drive around looking for addresses, you're nuts not to have a gps.
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On 2/22/2012 5:19 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

You don't know what you're missing. If you have to use maps, flashlight to read street signs, etc. the gps will take their use away. You'd be surprised how easy they are to learn and to use.
I just gave an old hand held and and old car gps to my brother-in-law and he loves them and they are nowhere as nice as my new ones.
I just got one for my son's birthday as he's been in the habit of calling us when he's lost when driving, wanting us to get on the computer for directions.
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On Tue, 21 Feb 2012 17:59:50 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

Astigmatism?? Doesn't sound like you have cataracts. I'm practically an eye doctor having had my cataracts removed 6 months ago and going thru a lot of testing and my wife just had one eye done this week and having the 2nd done next week. So I've been educated a lot on eye care lately. If it helps bifocals are made so the top portion is for distance and the small bottom portion is for reading books or stuff (not road signs). You should be able to read the signs thru the upper portion of your bifocals.
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Yes, my last two eye exams, they found that I needed axis and sphere correction, for astigmatism. I did try covering one eye and then the other -- both were under corrected, and fuzzy for reading street signs.
I agree, I should be able to read the road signs through the top lens. I should be able to see farther than 6 inches or so, through the bottoms.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Astigmatism?? Doesn't sound like you have cataracts. I'm practically an eye doctor having had my cataracts removed 6 months ago and going thru a lot of testing and my wife just had one eye done this week and having the 2nd done next week. So I've been educated a lot on eye care lately. If it helps bifocals are made so the top portion is for distance and the small bottom portion is for reading books or stuff (not road signs). You should be able to read the signs thru the upper portion of your bifocals.
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On Tue, 21 Feb 2012 21:52:20 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

In that case, I have to agree with some other posters... bring your glasses in to see if they correctly match your prescription.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

You might want to consider no-line bifocals; i.e., "progressive" lenses. Take a bit of getting used to - couple of days - but provide you with the ability to find a focus point for most any distance.
--

dadiOH
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Aging of Eyes Is Blamed for Range of Health Woes http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/21/health/aging-of-eyes-is-blamed-in-circadian-rhythm-disturbances.html
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wrote:

When I needed glasses, I tried them once and they drove me crazy. I could never get used to them especially for driving. I went back to a regular bifocal then.
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On 2/22/2012 9:58 AM, Doug wrote:

I also tried the "no-line" type and about fell on my a** when I first tried them. They had originally told me that it would take a few days to get used to them but after a week of no joy I regressed to the regular line type.
Don
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On 02/22/12 10:58 am, Doug wrote:

The only bifocals I've ever had have been progressive. Never had a problem: they work for distance, computer and reading.
Perce
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On 02/22/12 11:47 am, I wrote:

I thought of something else. When I get a prescription, whether from the optometrist or from the ophthalmologist, it specifies only the optical characteristics. When I take the prescription to get the glasses made (for the past many years it's been at Costco), they take the frame I selected (with its clear glass dummy lenses), fit it on me and mark the position of my pupils on the "lenses," then measure the distance from that mark to ... (I don't know: perhaps the bottom of the lens). That measurement is then part of the specification of the lenses that suit *me* in that frame. Then when I pick them up, they sometimes fiddle with the nose pads to make sure that the fit is correct and that the center of the lens is in the correct position. How does all that get taken care of with mail-order eyeglasses?
Perce
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On 2/22/2012 1:22 PM, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

Zenni asks for pupillary distance. Think that is all the opticians do.
Rather than measure myself, I had the eye doctor do it since I see him every 6 months.
With Zenni you can upload a picture of yourself without glasses and go through the frames to see what they will look like on you. You will have to adjust the frames when you get them but the two pair I've bought are memory titanium and fit right out of the box.
Last pair was $45, including shipping - $300 less than my optician charges.
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The spec is called PD, or Pupilary Distance.
1) Measure it with a ruler, it's measured in milimeters. Needs a trusted friend to hold the ruler, and do the check. 2) Ask your optician for the number 3) Zenni ships rulers to balance on your nose, and take your own measurement
--

Christopher A. Young
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wrote:

Once in a while that happens with some people. First pair took me a day to get used to. I'd never go back to a regular bifocal though. I've had progressives for about 12 years and find them perfect for reading, computer, etc.
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Not necessarily. My bifocals are set so the top is in focus at about 24" (monitors) and the bottoms about 12" (books/desk). I know people who have had these reversed for special purposes. "Bifocal" simply means there are two focal lengths in a single lens.
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On Feb 21, 5:59pm, "Stormin Mormon"

It would be more interesting and equally appropriate to read here how you keep mistaking Usenet for Facebook. -----
- gpsman
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How do I click to make you a friend?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
It would be more interesting and equally appropriate to read here how you keep mistaking Usenet for Facebook. -----
- gpsman
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Stormin,
Read about 1/2 of this thread. Here's what I understand. You have bifocals. Your old prescription no longer works well. You have trouble reading traffic signs, so it's "distance" vision that's giving you problems. You go to your optometrist. He measures your eyes and prescribes weaker distance vision. What? Think about it. You can't see at a distance so he prescribes weaker glasses. Doesn't make sense. Something is wrong here. It's hardly surprising that the new glasses don't work. Some illnesses, such as diabetes, can shrink and swell eyeballs thus changing the ability to focus. Poorly fitted eyeglasses can also cause problems. Go back to your optometrist and discuss your problem with him. Most likely the problem is not with the maker of the eyeglasses. I'm betting that you bought the glasses on-line, took them out of the box and slapped them on your face without any fitting or adjusting. That's a real problem with on-line opticians.
Dave M.
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...and you can't buy decent-fitting eyeglasses online.
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I've heard from a couple people. Whose Rx has gotten milder, as they age. I've found that if I hold my old glasses out a couple inches, the distance sharpens right up.
You're right that I got them online, which is the only way www.zennioptical.com sells. And you're right, I did very little adjusting. The wire frames with pads, had to push the pads closer.
I'm going to try and find an optical place that will check (or let me check) to see if the Rx of these Zennis is what I asked for.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Stormin,
Read about 1/2 of this thread. Here's what I understand. You have bifocals. Your old prescription no longer works well. You have trouble reading traffic signs, so it's "distance" vision that's giving you problems. You go to your optometrist. He measures your eyes and prescribes weaker distance vision. What? Think about it. You can't see at a distance so he prescribes weaker glasses. Doesn't make sense. Something is wrong here. It's hardly surprising that the new glasses don't work. Some illnesses, such as diabetes, can shrink and swell eyeballs thus changing the ability to focus. Poorly fitted eyeglasses can also cause problems. Go back to your optometrist and discuss your problem with him. Most likely the problem is not with the maker of the eyeglasses. I'm betting that you bought the glasses on-line, took them out of the box and slapped them on your face without any fitting or adjusting. That's a real problem with on-line opticians.
Dave M.
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