Woodstove chimney installation questions

Hi,
We are installing a woodstove on the first floor of our 2 storey house. It's a 6" outlet.
After pricing chimney pipe locally(wow!!) I found brand new triple wall pipe on ebay. Unfortunately, it seems that the pipe is from a defunct manufacturer (my google searches on "white metal products tristack chimney pipe" and subsets don't yield any helpful sites, anyway).
I believe that I have everything I need, except:
a ceiling support box (for the first floor ceiling/second floor floor)
a radiation shield/fire stop for the roof/second floor ceiling
a flue adaptor from the single wall pipe from the stove, to the triple wall pipe at the first floor ceiling.
After visiting Home depot, I see that the pipe and accessories that they sell are not compatible with my pipe. I would be grateful for any suggestions before I start modifying the home depot hardware to fit mine.
TIA jhauer
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Check your local regulations, in many areas triple wall pipe is illegal to use, because of a history of burn-through during chimney fires. This is probably why the manufacturer went under. Usually pipe, fitting, and accessories are all designed to fit the manufacturer who made the product and for that one product only that was approved by the authorities such as UL. Other manufacturer's pieces are designed NOT to be mixed with a different manufacturer's chimney.
For your own safety, you need to install a currently approved product.

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Do you gamble? If you use that 3 wall shit you are.

Getting rid of the crap from E-bay and getting legal, and safe pipe.

radiation shield????? WTF??? You got a nuke in that stove?

Aint such a thing anymore.

A good homeowners policy.

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JHauer2 wrote:

Yes it sounds like you have the right list. I can't answer the question others brought up about the safety of your pipe, but any approved pipe that is properly installed and maintained will be safe. You may find that you need to have some of the parts custom made for your pipe. The support box and the roof pass through shouldn't be much of a problem. The adapter from single wall to the triple wall could be a problem. Check with any local wood stove stores. If they don't have something you need to have a custom adapter made and it needs to be made to keep any liquids inside the pipe at the transition.
If you have never had a wood stove before, make sure that you install the single wall pipe correctly so that any liquid running down the pipe will stay inside. The old type of installations where the next higher pipe section slips OVER the lower section is upside down for modern installations. That is, the next higher section needs to slip INTO the lower section. This, of course, affects how the single wall to triple wall adapter is made.
Good luck.
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If you are not positive what you are doing, get a pro. Woodstoves are a common cause of house fires. And be sure to check with your insurer. Many insurers will not allow them and those that do certainly won't approve a DIY installation. Building codes also are very precise about clearances and such. They changed the size of the pipes a few years ago. I believe they went from 6 to 7 inches. ds

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Uhh Dick, what you are saying about insurance isn't true in all areas. Codes may be much more strict in areas where heating with wood is uncommon. And, DIY is ok, one just needs to pass the city/county building codes both for safety and to be sure of insurance coverage. That's true of all kinds of construction. I believe all of the major insurance companies in my area cover wood stoves and adding a wood stove doesn't significantly affect the cost of insurance. The size of the stove pipe as well as clearances, afaik, are part of the stove certification, so one needs only to follow the stove manufactures installation instructions. Building codes, at least where I am, are met if the item (stove, stovepipe, etc.) certification is followed. Although there are some general standards, clearances vary with products, and can vary with options such as heat shields.
Dick Smyth wrote:

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I have never heard of that manufacturer. I suggest going with a product that has been safety tested to UL103HT and has a log warranty. Simpson Dura Vent is my brand of preference, and I have sold several brands over the years.
Here are links to chimney on my COMMERCIAL site:
DuraVent Chimney http://www.FireLogs.com/DuraVent.htm http://www.FireLogs.com/DuraVentChimney.htm DuraChimney http://www.FireLogs.com/PDF/DuraVentDuraChimneyCatalog.pdf http://www.FireLogs.com/PDF/DuraVentDuraChimneyPriceList-DP2002.pdf http://www.FireLogs.com/PDF/DuraVentChimneyInstallation.pdf
The PDF files are directly from the manufacturer.
--
John Galbreath Jr.
http://www.firelogs.com /
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