Wiring Connections for a 2-Speed Motor

I have a 2-speed shaded-pole motor that was scrapped by someone else from a Sears dehimidifier, Leads are Red, Orange(sort of) and Black. The motor is an OH SUNG Model 4681A20040J. I can cross-reference that number to both a Sears and an LG replacement motor. Neither offers any clues as to the correct wiring for the motor. Measuring the resistance between the three wires does not give any clues. Does anyone have a knowledge of what is the "normal" color coding for this type of motor? I can connect the motor in series with a regular household iron acting as a "fuse", but would prefer to have the correct information and save the experimentation.
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On 7/1/2012 3:54 PM, hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

My *guess* is the black is high, red is low and the orange is common.
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I connected the orange and black leads to 120V motor came up to speed just fine. Left connected and measured 0.8v between the black and red leads. Then connected red lead in place of black lead, motor ran at the same speed as before, measured 0.4v between the red and black leads. When orange-black connected to pwer lines, then added red lead to black lead, not a hint of motor speed change. I have not tried powering the motor between the red and black leads, too afraid that might blow the whole motor. I will do/try that with an electric iron in series to act as a fuse after daylight on Monday.
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/wiring-connections-for-a-2-speed-motor-703037-.htm DA wrote: hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

These C-frame 2-speed shaded pole motors will run at (virtually) the same speed without a load. I betcha you have already seen it work at both speeds, it just did not make much of a difference turning just the rotor by itself. You have to add at least *some* resistance to the rotor's rotation to feel the difference. If you still have it, mount the original fan blades onto the shaft and then give it a go.
Sounds like black-red is the slow, black-orange is the high speed. These are not dual-speed per se, these are dual-power. The higher speed is just a tap at an intermediate point on the coil with fewer turn, hence lower resistance and higher current/power/rotation speed.
Do not connect both red and orange at the same time, it'll overheat the winding and further reduce efficiency of this already not very efficient type motor. The unused end is supposed to be just isolated.
------------------------------------- /_/ ((@v@)) NIGHT ():::() OWL VV-VV
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wrote:

Black-Red did cause sparks, so Orange is the common lead, and orange - red is one speed, orange - black is the other speed. That's all I need to write on the motor when I throw (gently) the motor into my spare motor collection. I can worry about which is the lower and higher speeds when I need a motor of that size. Thanks for suggestions received.
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replying to hr(bob) hofmann, randman wrote: Did you ever find a use for the motor?
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