Window repair question

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I'm trying to keep the house true to the original design, even if it means paint, putty and rot :)
I thought of replacing them, but I can fix all of them for less then the cost of replacing just one :(
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Zootal wrote: ...

Indeed, and if they're kept painted, etc., they'll last a long time.
On the energy thing, I intended to add in my earlier treatise the comment somebody did make about the idea of a solid plexiglass cover would likely be a problem from both condensation but a conventional storm over it would help.
It's not at all difficult to build them assuming the frames are deep enough to hold them and they would serve double-duty of the extra energy savings as well as a first barrier for the rain.
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I might mention that these windows are for an unheated unfinished basement. It's full size, has a ton of storage, half dozen work benches, pingpong table, etc. but we don't go downthere much. I'm not sure how much heat loss goes through them. I live in the mid-Willamette Valley, Oregon, and sub-freezing weather is rare. We use wood heat for the top two floors, and I think my stove is oversized for the house as it is - two or three loads of wood and we are toasty as can be :)
But seriously, it would not be that hard to use double or even triple pane glass - would it be worth the effort since the basement is not heated?
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Zootal wrote: ...

Under those circumstances, perhaps not on the heat loss -- I was thinking of the conventional storm since you have such an issue w/ driving rain, in particular w/ the energy gain a secondary benefit.
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For unheated cellar, probably not worth multi pane windows for heat. I'd seriously consider plexiglass. With holes drilled, and screwed to the outside. Partly draft, heat, and partly keep water off the windows.
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Eww. Ugly :)

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On Tue, 24 Nov 2009 18:08:49 -0500, Van Chocstraw

Not too even mention killing any basement drafts of cold air :-/
Oh, ya done good.
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It makes no sense at all to try to restore windows like these in a house that isn't on the National Register of Historic Landmarks. Your two logical choices are: 1) Replace with a good quality vinyl basement window with whatever features you deem important. 2) For windows that will never need opening replace window with glass blocks. Trying to restore what you have is an exercise in futility. Consider that many building codes are now requiring 'egress windows' in basements that do or could have any living facilities in them, so you could be ahead of the game in that respect should you opt for it. It is prudent to use your time, talent and money on things that have some reasonable practical value; anything else is just entertainment.
Joe
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Joe wrote: ...

That makes _no_ sense at all...either of those options is way more expensive than repairing what he has and once done they'll last a long time.
The egress thing is strawman; OP has already indicated it is unheated space therefore it isn't living space and it would take far more than simply replacing the windows themselves for those to become adequate.
I'd say it's "prudent" to be prudent and not spend money needlessly...
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wrote:

I see nothing futile about it. I'm simply fixing a window. What you are suggesting is the equivalent of replacing your car simply because it has a flat tire.
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Zootal wrote: ...

Agreed.
Did you check out the hardware/building supply places for DAP 33 glazing compound yet?
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No, I put it on hold a few days. As I was cleaning the frame, I realized that the bottom wood piece was rotted much worse then I originally thought and needs to be replaced. I can make one of these, as they don't require a router jig or table. I don't have a router bit that will do a rabbet deep enough, so I'm off to HomeDepot tomorrow for wood and router bits. I might do the sides also, since they are easy to do. Fortunately the cross pieces are good, as I don't have the setup to make those.
And I'll definitely check for DAP 33 glazing compound. The glazing compound I have is acrylic something or other.
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Zootal wrote: ...

OK, sounds good...if you get a chance and are interested, post the actual product brand/name and I'll see if I know anything specific about it...
As I say, I've used quite a number but I'm sure there are some I've not ( :) ) as well...but a couple of the others I have used I either didn't like at all for various problems/reasons and one that is in the end a good product I don't think is a good choice for a neophyte because it is difficult to use correctly primarily because it sets up so quickly one can't work it like one can normal compound or even caulks.
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This is what I have on my shelf:
DAP "Alex plus", Acrylic latex caulk plus silicone, "35 yr. durability guarantee". And it's almond colored, which doesn't match anything I have - why did I get almond colored?
ACE White glazing compound. "Glazing Compound is a siliconized acrylic formula that is used to replace old or brlken windowpanes..."
I also found a tube of what appears to be ordinary latex caulk.
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Zootal wrote:

You don't want either of the caulks, obviously.
I looked at the Ace web site for that glazing compound and it was less than helpful. I've not tried that particular one; it sounds similar to the product I disrecommended for the neophyte as being hard to work quickly as the surface skims over very quickly once it's in place and makes it difficult to get a good clean edge when not practiced in using the putty knife.
I couldn't find the instruction/usage data on the web site; I've got to run to town tomorrow anyway, I'll see if it's on the shelf to take a look at. If it expects the "triangular tip" to be all you're going to need to get a clean finished edge, I have my doubts. The other problem w/ the tube types I've used previously is they aren't stiff enough so that they sag before they cure so the shape after they were knifed isn't the same shortly after when set.
The traditional compound is still the standard in my book...
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I take back a few of the evil things I've said about Home Depot. They actually had buckets of DAP 33 on the shelf. And my wife bought me a router table for an early christmas present. Time to have some serious fun now :)
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Zootal wrote:

See? Guess where it was leaking. ________________

You don't need a bit that will do the full depth in one pass. In fact, you should do it in 2-4 passes. _______________

Do 'em right - bottom too - or you'll be back to leaks in no time.
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Actually - there was a pane missing and a piece of cardboard in it's place. The rotted bottom was only part of the problem, and not why I originally decided to overhaul it. IOW I could see the caulk (on the inside, they installed the window in the frame backwards) was dried and splitting, plus a missing pane. After I removed it, I found the rotted wood. I'll take some pics and post the before/during/after images.

I'm easy to convince. The side pieces rotted at the bottom where the were joined to the bottom piece. The top piece and the cross pieces (I forget what they are called) are the only ones in good shape. It looks like the bottom piece was not a single piece of wood, but it looks like they laminated three pieces together. One with the greek or whatever finish (ogee router bit?), one center piece, and a narrower piece for the rabbet. Weird. My approach is to use a single piece and just use my router to shape it. I have one bit already, I just need the deeper rabbet bit.
I have a 1/4 bit I can use for the first pass, and a 3/8 I can use for the second. I'm not a router expert, I would have just done the 1/2 rabbet in one pass...
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What I suggested was like replacing your car because the engine/ transmission failed. It will take a year or two but you will be replacing the failed windows again, bet on it.
Joe
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Joe wrote: ...

I haven't seen anything but the pictures and have a _lot_ of original windows much older than these and would still disagree that it's necessarily so that when repaired they'll not last quite a long time.
And, one can generally repair/replace a transmission/engine still for quite significantly less expenditure than for a whole new automobile.
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