Window glazing compound vs Silicone URGENT

I started a reglazing job, some spot work, and painting. I already pulled 2 windows out and painted them. I'm getting the glazing compound tomorrow. But I can't leave the windows out for a week while the glazing cures, I don't have the room to store them. And if I do 2 at a time, it will take months.
My family is pushing me to use white silicone instead since the windows are painted white, and just put them back in immediately. They said if the window gets broken, the silicone comes off with the glass and you just scrape it off the wood. (I know it's not that easy). Getting the windows out was a pain, so putting them back in, then removing to paint later is not the ideal thing..
I know Silicone is a bad idea, getting that stuff off is a real pain, but it's quick fix. What should I do? Thanks..
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not sure i understand. glazing compound is white too, isn't it? you can also buy it in a caulk tube or in cans. silcone CAN'T be painted so that is another reason it is a bad idea.
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Glazing compound can be a pain to work with. I vote for white silicone or caulking that can be painted if that is important.
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replying to homeguy, Defftonez wrote: This is not correct, as a glazier and Sika certified installer it's not true that silicone is paintable ..it's quite the opposite. The are SOME speciallys sealants that contain sili. But 95% of silicone caulk is not paintable.
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On 8/17/2016 1:44 PM, Defftonez wrote:

I have bad news for you. Just after installing new glass in the windows in April of 2006 when this question was asked the OP has passed.
He was sitting in the garden enjoying a cold beer when a breeze came up. The glass was blown out of a poorly glazed window, crashing on his head. A shard of glass cut his carotid artery.
It was a nice funeral and after the service people were invited for a bbq where they served home made blood sausage.
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I just re-glazed a couple of old windows and I used glaze in a caulk tube. It wasn't too bad to work with and I had my windows up the next day after curing overnight. The hardest part was getting the old glaze off. I'm not sure if putting them up after curing overnight was the right thing, but it's been a month and so far so good.
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Why would you want to do that? The putty/glazing compound isn't what keeps the glass in, the glazing points do that. Just stick in the glass, push in the points, putty, paint, and re-mount the sashes as soon as the paint dries.

Use DAP glazing compound. You know you want to.
--Goedjn
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Scut Farkus wrote:

I'm not sure I'm following you on this.
What is the reason that you don't want to put the windows back in if you use the glazing compound/putty? If you are worried about them falling out, you are supposed to use "points" to hold the glass in while the glazing compound/putty dries.
Points come 2 ways. One is diamond shaped and requires a "point gun" to install them. The others are pointed on one end and have a lip one the other end so you can push them in with a flat screwdriver or putty knife.
See figure #7 http://www.easy2diy.com/cm/easy/diy_ht_index.asp?page_id5694608
You can also use small nails to hold the glass as long as you are very careful. It's very easy to break a pane if you get the nail to close to the glass or slip with the hammer.
BTW, if you want to use silicone it's not that big of a deal if the window has to be replaced. Removing silicone is a LOT easier than removing hardened glazing putty!
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Ron wrote:

(Click on steps and then see figure #7)

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