Wide door

Page 1 of 2  
I'm installing doors without the frame in a home. This means I had to route the hinge and bore the holes for knobs and latches. All went well until I hit the last door, a closet door, were the door is about 3/16" wider than the frame. What would be your method used to make the door fit?
Thanks
--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
http://www.avast.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In typed:

Ummmm..., trim the door to fit the opening?
I have a feeling that I am missing what your real question is here.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| What would be your method used to make the door fit? |
It needs to be trimmed. The neatest way, unless you have a powerful table saw with a massive outfeed table, is to clamp something straight, like a scrap of birch plywood, onto the door. Then cut it with a circular saw. Set the guide board in the distance you need to cut plus the offset of the blade from the saw edge.
That should give you a pretty good cut. You can touch it up with a belt sander, if necessary, and round the edges with a Surform plane.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
And also, the edge of the door facing the strike plate is cut at a slight angle(1-2deg), I guess to facilitate clearance of the edge closest to the stop.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Meanie wrote:

A plane.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, February 12, 2015 at 10:10:09 AM UTC-5, rbowman wrote:

3/16" is a lot of planing, plus planing by hand isn't even. Circular saw with a guide clamped on sounds like a better idea.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 02/12/2015 9:29 AM, trader_4 wrote:

With a decent handplane that is sharp it's not that much at all...then again, finding an average homeowner who even has one plus being able to sharpen it successfully if they come here to ask "how" isn't high on my list of sure bets...
--


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Surprised no one has suggested cutting 3/32" off one side and 3/32" off the other, so the door still 'looks' decent, assuming some kind of panel door.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, February 12, 2015 at 11:34:28 AM UTC-5, Robert Macy wrote:

It's easy to cut an inch off cleanly, not so easy to do a small strip like this.
I think he should investigate further. If only one door in a house is off, then most likely all the doors were built to standard width, and one has s ettled. If that happened, there's no way it settled side to side evenly wi thout going out of square. So taking 3/16 off is not going to solve the pr oblem. The problem is probably that the door is square and the opening no longer is, it has become a parallelogram.
There might be an easy way to fix this. If you pull the framing off to whe re you can see the stud, it is probably shimmed out to the right distance t hen nailed, but has since moved. Reduce the shim size, might be able to ju st move the frame back to square. Or maybe it's just loose and can be rena iled.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| Surprised no one has suggested cutting 3/32" off one side and 3/32" off | the other, so the door still 'looks' decent, assuming some kind of panel | door.
3/16" from about 4.5" is not nearly enough to be visible on an average panel door, and of course it can't be seen at all if the door is just a slab. Cutting one side is easier and allows the factory edge to be left where it shows most, on the passage side. That way, if he accidentally gouges the door edge a bit it will be easy to hide.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

routing for the hinges. C'est la vie.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have some nice big hand planes, one about 20 inches long. But I also have an electric plane. I'd use that instead. Great tool.
Draw a line, then plane down to the line.
--
Dan Espen

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan Espen wrote:

I've never used an electric plane but if it's the average hollowcore interior door taking 3/16 off would hardly be worth plugging one in.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You are underestimating the feeling of power one of those things gives you. Like I said, great tool.
Yes you can do the job without power, but it's more fun and you'll get a better result with power.
--
Dan Espen

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A bedrock 605 is perfect for that application; it would take longer to unroll the extension cord for the portable power planer.
I'll argue about the better result, too. The bedrock (with a well-sharpened cutter) will leave a better surface than the power planer (which takes a series of finely scalloped cuts).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) writes:

So, I looked up Bedrock 605. I have one of those, the blade is just slightly wider than a door edge. Not the tool I'd pick.
I inherited a plane, about 20 inches long that looks like a full sized 4x4 with a blade that goes the full width (4 inches). Perfect for the job.
Still I like the power plane. I know in theory, you might see scallops because of the way it cuts. But in practice that doesn't happen.
--
Dan Espen

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan Espen wrote:

I find the long shavings coming up through the mouth very pleasing. For most woods they smell good too, and the only noise is a quiet swish. Whatever fluffs your fur though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I admire your attitude. I bet you're good at it too.
Maybe because I'm not a pro, I like tools that make hard things easy.
I spent plenty of time sharpening plane blades.
--
Dan Espen

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan Espen wrote:

Sorry, I'm pretty much a traditionalist. I don't even have a power saw let alone a power planer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
trader_4 wrote:

You're kidding right?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.