Why would anyone C clamp open all the fireplace flues?

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On 12/27/2012 11:46 AM, dpb wrote:

Is it one of these? ^_^
http://hdsupplysolutions.com/shop/product-robertshaw_automatic_pilot_relight_kit-223280
http://preview.tinyurl.com/bndq8b7
TDD
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On 12/27/2012 12:14 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

http://hdsupplysolutions.com/shop/product-robertshaw_automatic_pilot_relight_kit-223280
Cute. Hadn't seen one of them before, actually...if it were more inaccessible location wouldn't be a bad idea.
The one that _is_ installed just came back from checking and all was well... :)
--
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On 12/27/2012 1:39 PM, dpb wrote:

I've installed the non-walking/talking units on various gas burning equipment that had a problem with errant drafts blowing the pilot out. There are even 12vdc automatic reigniters for RV equipment. ^_^
TDD
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On 12/27/2012 3:03 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

Out of curiosity, what triggers their action--they have to be quick enough the TC doesn't go cold, obviously, and the valve closes automagically.
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On 12/27/2012 3:16 PM, dpb wrote:

If you see the white ceramic insulated probe/electrode in the picture, not only does it produce a spark to ground but it acts as a flame sense probe for the electronics in the unit which detects the electrical conductivity of the pilot flame. Some devices have a separate sensor probe but the Robertshaw unit utilizes a single electrode. ^_^
TDD
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On 12-27-2012 05:45, Jim wrote:

It's also why the instructions say to hold it for sixty seconds after lighting.
I once had two elderly ladies ask me to look at their ancient gravity feed furnace. I didn't know that furnaces had thermocouples but I knew what they were, so I figured out that's what it was and why it was there, and that the reason the furnace only quit while they were on a long trip was that the pilot alone couldn't heat the umpty-year-old thing enough unless the furnace came on often enough to keep the TC from getting cold.
But I had no clue where to buy one that would fit, so I told them to never set it lower than 68°F and built for them an emergency starter (with a flashlight battery) in case they forgot.
--
Wes Groleau

He that complies against his will is of the same opinion still.
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hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

I googled for "how much energy does a pilot light waste" and found the Strait Dope article which said it was 15 cents to 30 cents a day: "How much per day does it cost to run pilot lights?" http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?tg954
This article said $10 a month for the pilot flame: http://forums2.gardenweb.com/forums/load/strucs/msg1119523314242.html
Yet, Wikipedia says half the energy used is wasted through the pilot flame: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilot_light
Doesn't add up ...
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On 12/26/2012 10:02 PM, Jim wrote:

in summer. But I don't have records back that far to verify. I bought an electric spark igniter at a garage sale, but didn't know what I was doing and feared burning down the house. Never installed it.
New furnace has an electric igniter.
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hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

This physics site says it costs about $200/year for a pilot light. http://physics.ucsd.edu/do-the-math/2012/03/pilot-lights-are-evil /
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William Don**ly wrote:

Not a proper scientific test though - he did not tourn off all the pilots and do another timed meter reading. Maybe he has a leak somewhere ventilated and not noticeable and is pissig gas everywhere? ;->
Oh - and whilst the UK uses kWh too, it's not the SI unit for energy.
Good memories though, of when the UK uses to have cuFt gas meters and bill by the therm (the wholesale market still does).
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That's what a pilot light is FOR.

No. Pilot lights use an insignificant amount of gas, and hence produce an insignificant amount of fumes. There is NO danger to human health from the exhaust of a pilot light.

Not really.

Depends on the appliance. There's not much point in keeping a pilot on all the time on a furnace or gas fireplace. On the other hand, imagine what a PITA it would be if you had to relight the pilot light every time you wanted to use your water heater, clothes dryer, or stove.

You pay for convenience.

So take the clamp off, and open the damper when you light the fireplace and close it after the fire is COMPLETELY out.
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On Wed, 26 Dec 2012 18:54:44 +0000 (UTC), Doug Miller

Nonsense. There are vent-free gas logs. No clip at all, though I wish there were one.

The pilot light doesn't but keeping the damper open will.

Or gas fireplace. ;-)

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On 12/26/2012 10:54 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

In a perfect world, I think you're right. Building codes allow for a less than perfect world.

My experience has been different. I don't have records going back that far, but I've been turning my furnace pilot light off during the summer for decades. It saved enough to be well worth the effort.

Building codes allow for a less than perfect world. Like when you forget to open the damper. Or when you're sure you left it open, but the wife closed it. Or when you have a visitor. Or when the kids get cold and you're not around. or...or...or
My chimney is capped, but there's also a board over the front of the fireplace. And my air conditioner condenser is wrapped, but there's a sticker on the breaker that says, "don't turn this on before you uncover the compressor."
Not everybody is perfect...

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On 12/26/2012 12:17 PM, Jim wrote:

A standing pilot does a couple of things. It can keep things warm which helps prevent corrosion and it tends to drive away any insects that may want to take up residence in the flue and burners. It's also simple and reliable, the electronic ignition equipped systems are more complicated and have more points of failure. Most folks leave the pilot burning in cold weather when the fireplace may be used and turn the gas off in the warmer months especially if they are using LP gas. ^_^
TDD
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On 12/26/2012 1:47 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

Turned out there was a spider web across the spark gap.
I also had a CD burner that refused to work because of a spider web across the lens.
Maybe I should clean house more often...
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On 12/26/2012 8:26 PM, mike wrote:

I was working on a commercial refrigeration unit one time and found a short circuit caused by a mouse that had crawled through an open conduit knock out hole in the compressor's electrical junction box. The mouse had an electrifying experience. ^_^
TDD
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email.me:

What a shocking story.
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On 12-26-2012 21:26, mike wrote:

Maybe you should put a "web-free zone" sign on your front door.
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

I've never used the fireplace before, so it was unnatural for me to think that people keep the pilot flame on all the time (wasting gas?).
Once I warm up to the idea of keeping the pilot flame lit all the time, then it becomes obvious why you'd want the damper to be locked open all the time.
But, if that's the case that the pilot is supposed to always be lit, then why bother with the electronic snapper to light the pilot in the first place?
You could use a flame to light the pilot if it's just a one-time deal.
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On 12/26/2012 8:46 PM, Jim wrote:

in outside windy conditions.
You can use an automatic snapper instead of a pilot light to light the burner. Newer units typically use an electric heater that gets hot enough to light the gas. Neither are particularly practical for a fireplace insert without easy access to power.
The cost of running a pilot is not zero. And one could argue that at least some of the heat from an inside pilot ends up in the living space.
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