Why did the professional camera reviewers totally miss a serious flaw in the camera?

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I'm curious why the following three camera reviewers totally missed a very serious and obvious flaw in the Nikon Coolpix camera lineup.
The flaw is the infamous Nikon coolpix flimsy battery door latch molded as a thin, easily broken loop of plastic on the coolpix camera body. The fix has been described in various ways by various users in other threads. The fix isn't the point of this thread.
DPREVIEW didn't even test camera integrity: http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/nikoncp3100 /
DCRESOURCE totally missed the mark: http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/nikon/coolpix3100-review /
STEVE'S DIGICAMS was clueless: http://www.steves-digicams.com/2003_reviews/nikon3100.html
The question I am incensed about and very curious about is how could the reviewers I trusted have been so inanely incompetent to have totally missed the fact the camera would inevitably turn into a brick due to the obvious poor engineering that wasn't visible to the consumer but which should have been wholly obvious to the "professional" camera reviewer?
Is it that the reviewers are: - Paid by the camera manufacturers to tout their products? - Paid by the advertisers to tout the manufacturer's products? - Clueless? - ??? or ???
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I'm curious what this has to do with home repair?

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wrote:

You have to repair the camera when you get it home.
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-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1
Jeanette Guire wrote:

They probably aren't allowed to test the cameras to destruction! With the light use the reviewers put on a test camera, something like a flimsy latch isn't going to break. Even if it did they aren't going to write it in their article - camera manufacturers aren't going to be too trusting of a reviewer who breaks cameras!
- -- Brendan Gillatt brendan brendangillatt co uk http://www.brendangillatt.co.uk PGP Key: http://pgp.mit.edu:11371/pks/lookup?op=get&search=0xBACD7433 -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE----- Version: GnuPG v1.4.3 (MingW32)
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On Mon, 15 Oct 2007 14:45:45 GMT, Jeanette Guire

Clueless.
That's why when considering a new camera, you *start* with a review, but then do a lot of reading in the on-line forums associated with the model camera you are considering. However, that might not even help with a new model that doesn't have much time in the hands of users.
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Jeanette Guire wrote:

You came to the right place with your concerns.
Experts here at alt.home.repair are ready to deal with your worries. We unaimously recommend:
Duct tape.
Hope this helps.
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Absolutely listen to this recommendation. This guy knows his shit big time.
You must have heard the famous saying, "When someone says Duct Tape, people listen."
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The most inventive use I've ever seen for duct-tape to make the most efficient and low-cost watercraft ever ------ Red Green used sections of straight and elbow air-ducts (the large 2x2 ft. variety). Creating two pontoons by taping the sections together. The elbows upturned at the ends to keep the water out, the shape making a boat-bow for easier movement in water. A section of chain-link fence across the two pontoons with some lawn furniture on top. It worked perfectly.
How is this camera related? If some photographers built one they might be able to get to some scenes worth viewing by others. Those who inflict the world with their agonizingly boring cat and birdbath photos need all the help and advice that they can get. If not for them, then for the rest of us who have to endure their relentless shit.
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HankLanglin wrote:

lsmft
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Al Bundy wrote:

Or hay wire!
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I happen to be one of those who suffered this common problem.
Just to lend some seriousness, duct tape doesn't work. There's enough continuous upward pressure on the door from the spring-loaded pair of AA cells that the door gradually shifts the tape, opens slightly, and loses the electrical connection.
Rubber bands don't work because they happen to pass over various controls (such as the zoom) that need to be freely accessible.
I envy those who had enough of the surgeon's touch to mount a paperclip. I myself used the delightfully outside-the-box solution of the metal plate externally mounted via a bolt through the tripod mount. Brilliant!
I'd also opine that this (rec.home.repair; I see it's cross-posted within reason) is an appropriate newsgroup, or certainly not inappropriate, for the discussion of repairing a physical household item. Appliance repair discussion tends to go here, and this seems little different.
Art
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Arthur Shapiro wrote:

Then you don't know the proper way to use duck (duct) tape. In a case like this, you use the tape to hold something against the door, so it CAN'T move.
--
Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I\'ve got my DD214 to
prove it.
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Michael A. Terrell wrote:

Where in world did you come up with duck?? One doesn't tape ducks; one tapes ducts. except it isn't very good for that.....
--
john mcwilliams

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On Sun, 21 Oct 2007 10:25:15 -0700, John McWilliams wrote:

Peter Scott did it all the time.
--
Neil
reverse ra and delete l
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So why the latter?
It might originally have been called duck tape. See the Etymology section of the Wikipedia article.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duct_tape
The issue is confusing, because it wasn't used for ducts until long after it was invented.
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William Sommerwerck wrote:

Not so confusing now, as apparently there's a manufacturer of the stuff with "Duck" in its name, putting out a product called "'Duck Tape' brand of duct tape." Obviously in their interest to have folks call it "Duck", but I've not run across this brand ever, but it explains a whole lot.
--
john mcwilliams

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"Duck Tape" has been a trademark registered in the US since 1993, for "Elongated Tape Having a Pressure Sensitive Adhesive on One Side... FIRST USE IN COMMERCE: 19800114." The owner is "Manco Tape, Inc. CORPORATION OHIO 2040 W. 110 St. Cleveland OHIO 44107."
-- Larry
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Duck tape and duct tape are TWO DIFFERENT THINGS!!!!
Duck tape is made from cloth and is a REALLY bad choice for using on ducts. It was designed originally to repair tarps and withstand the weather.
Duct tape is made from metal foil and is designed for use on metal ductwork.
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Wrong. Again.
The original DUCT tape had and still has NO metal foil.
http://tinyurl.com/ywrzu5

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Steve Barker LT wrote:

> > The original DUCT tape had and still has NO metal foil. > > http://tinyurl.com/ywrzu5
Metal tape with adhesive is known as "flashing tape", used to seal the edges of roofs to prevent the ingress of moisture under the edge of roofing material or between walls that are built hard up against each other. Flashing used to be done with lead foil sealed/glued with pitch, now it is done with adhesive metal [usually aluminium] tape, hence "flashing tape". In Australia, generic "duct tape" is essentially like a very wide electrical tape: a stretchy PVC backing with glue on it, usually about 2 inches wide. This tape that's cloth backed in plastic with an easy release adhesive sounds more like "gaffer tape", which is used extensively in the entertainment industry to hold electrical cables in place and for slapdash on-the-spot repairs. A "gaffer" is an on-set electrician used during the making of a movie or in-house electrician for a theatre, hence "gaffer tape".
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