Wheel torque specs

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ransley wrote:

Well, actually, yes, the boys at tire shops I deal at do routinely -- as other say they either use the air adapter or manual...
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wrote:

The tire shop I use (Tire Warehouse) ALWAYS uses a torque wrench and makes you sign a form stating you were told to check the lugnuts or bring it back for free retightnining after 24 hours....
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wrote:

Sam's Club torques the lugs here too as does the local tire store. That may just be because I have alloy wheels on my car and truck. The old steel wheels were very forgiving..
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

As were drum brakes. I think the prime driving force that forced ( so to speak :) ) them into being somewhat more careful was the complaints received of brake pedal jitter/bounce caused by over-torque.
imo, $0.02, etc., etc., etc., ...
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Actually. yes. But 4-Day Tire Store went out of business. The typical shop just blasts them on with a pneumatic impact driver.
cheers Bob
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My local one (Les Schwab - NW group)runs them down with air wrench then does a final with a torque wrench. Doesn't matter - they torque them so tight I can't budge 'em using cruciform lug wrench.
Harry K
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On Wed, 4 Nov 2009 14:55:50 -0800 (PST), ransley

I don't torque my lugnuts. I torque my house.

Harbor Freight sent me one of their endless catalogs, this one with a device to, it claims, provide 30 times as much torque to remove lugnuts. For 20 dollars. I'll admit, I needed it once, in 45 years, and ruined a tire when I couldnt get it off to put on the spare. But I guess that is no reason to buy one now. But if I changed tires for other people it might be worht it, if it works.
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How the fuck do you ruin a tire while removing lugnuts?
If you want a better tool to remove lugnuts, get a 1/2" breaker bar and a socket.
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On Thu, 05 Nov 2009 21:58:09 -0600, AZ Nomad

I didn't do it then. I did it when I had to drive the gas station with the flat tire still on.

Is that really as good as this?: http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber645
I doubt it.
Assuming this is made well enough that it won't break soon.
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Unless you are a toddler, you can easily generate 4-500 ft-lbs jumping on a 18" breaker bar. That'll loosen any lugnut.

That's the problem. I doubt it would work twice before breaking. It a ratchet can't take that kind of torque, why would you expect that toy's mechanism to be able to take it?
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re: "...you can easily generate 4-500 ft-lbs jumping on a 18" breaker bar. That'll loosen any lugnut."
...or snap any lug.
Jerking a wrench on *any* nut is a great way to snap *any* bolt.
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does that include beef byproducts?
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On Fri, 06 Nov 2009 10:31:19 -0600, AZ Nomad

Just the bullshit.
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On Fri, 06 Nov 2009 06:56:06 -0800, Smitty Two

Maybe a little ketchup?
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And a length of pipe over the handle and jump on it. That's how I loosened the lug bolts on my Karmann Ghia.
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wrote:

I told here once the story of letting the car sit in the snow with one hubcap missing, then having a flat in the spring at Newark airport and breaking 4 of the 5 studs, one I think by hand but the others by standing, not even jumping, on the lugwrench. Then driving to NYC with only one lug bolt holding the left rear wheel on.

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wrote:

Glad you can tell the story.
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Thank you.
I drove in the parking lot a bit before I left it. If it hadn't worked well, I would have stayed there. When the final lugbolt broke, just before lower Broadway in NYC, I barely noticed it. I was either stopped or going a mile or two per hour. And the full-size car only sagged a little bit, back at the left rear corner.
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I once had 2 front wheels installed on a 1988 Subaru at a "second hand wheel shop". Some people call places like this a Junk Yard.
The 2 wagon wheels looked just like the originals and the 5 bolt pattern matched up perfectly so the "tech" slapped 'em on, grabbed his air wrench and tightened them down.
I picked up the car and immediately hit the road for a 100 mile drive. The car didn't handle as well as I was used to, but I wrote it off to the snow packed roads and windy conditions. I didn't determine the real problem until I was almost at my destination. Looking back on the trip, I was lucky that the conditions were such that I was never driving at anything close to highway speeds.
As I slowed to about 10 miles an hour, the car felt like it was "wobbling" back and forth. I pulled over and discovered that both front wheels were loose. It turned out that the center hub hole was too small and the wheel was not pushed all the way onto the lugs. In other words, there were bare threads between the hub and the back side of the wheels, so even though the lugs were tightened against the wheel, the wheels wasn't really tightened up against anything. They were sort of "floating" on the hub.
The wheels had loosened up enough that the lug holes were a slightly oblong, but I was able to tighten them up enough to drive slowly to my destination and deal with the wheels the next day.
I had to get 2 new wheels and replace all of the lugs since the threads were ruined also.
After a bit of a discussion, the "second hand wheel shop" reimbursed me for all of my expenses.
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On Sat, 7 Nov 2009 10:14:33 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

LOL
That's pretty good. A fly-by-night place wouldn't have done that.
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