Wheel torque specs

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This was posted on another newsgroup but is of interest for many here also http://www.discounttiredirect.com/direct/brochure/info/tmpInfoWheelTorque.jsp
If your car is in the garage attached to your house, the post is ON topic.
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Have you ever seen anyone work on your car check lug nut torque? The only thing I have ever seen is an air impact wrench blasting them tight.
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ransley wrote:

I use an impact wrench and recheck with a tire wrench. I have a torque wrench but it's not that critical. Mine never come off. Too loose they come off, too tight and you break off the stud, it's not rocket science.
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Van Chocstraw wrote:

Hi, Or you can warp the disc brake rotor hub. I use impact wrency since I have compressor in the garage but I check with torque wrench.
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wrote:

You cannot check torque on a nut that is already tightened to it's torque spec. You must use the torque wrench to tighten "up to" torque.
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Hi, of course. Impact wrench is just to speed up the work. Once nut contacts rim, switch to torque wrench finish it off.
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On Nov 5, 6:32am, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

re: "You cannot check torque on a nut that is already tightened to it's torque spec."
Well, you can certainly *check* it. ;-)
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On Fri, 6 Nov 2009 09:50:46 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

You cannot tell if it is correct, however, which would be the point of checking. ;-)
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On Wed, 04 Nov 2009 18:05:30 -0500, Van Chocstraw

    I fear you are underestimating the problem. You may be able to get accurate torque using your method, but many people can not.
    Improper torque can damage the rotor or the wheel. It can cause the loss of a wheel (usually only when someone leaves them finger tight). It can cause an accident in some cases.
    I recommend using a known good torque wrench to tighen the lugs. It is not hard to do, so why not. I had some work done at a national chain tyre center and was very supprised and pleased to watch them use the air wrench to snug the lugs, but then use a real torque wrench to tighten them. Usuall I end up redoing them as soon as I get home.
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On Wed, 4 Nov 2009 14:55:50 -0800 (PST), ransley

Seen a broken lug from an impact wrench?
Snap them right off or ....
pic:
http://metallurgist.com/images/LugNutFailure/LugNutFailure2.jpg
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I saw something like that one evening. Couple friends of mine broke a couple studs like that. One of them, I was over to thier house when they rang on the phone. Husband and I went out, bought a couple studs and lugs, and went to go bring em home. That was a lot of work.
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re: "Snap them right off or ...."
The only time I have snapped lugs is when trying to get the lugnut off an overally tightened/rusted lug & nut combination.
My 97 Dodge Ram Van was the worse.
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On Fri, 6 Nov 2009 09:56:05 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

I don't know about 1997, but on my 55 Dodge Royal Lancer Convertible and my 1964 Dodge Dart convertible, the lug nuts were right hand thread on one side of the car and left hand thread on the other side. Maybe that was the problem on your van!
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I use a torque extension with my impact wrench.
wrote:

Have you ever seen anyone work on your car check lug nut torque? The only thing I have ever seen is an air impact wrench blasting them tight.
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Supposedly those torque limiters do a good job. I've not tried one. I either torque wrench, or us a criss cross wrench.
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On Wed, 04 Nov 2009 14:55:50 -0800, ransley wrote:

Over-tight usually, particulalrly on alloys. I started taking wheels in to tire places when they weren't on the car* just so they couldn't f*ck them up when putting them back on the vehicle.
* needs a second vehicle, obviously. Driving on the rotors doesn't work too well ;)
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I've over torqued one of my wheels, on my last Blazer. Learned my lesson, and didn't do that again.
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Christopher A. Young
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wrote:

You need to watch more Cops.

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They should have a torque stick on the impact wrench. It is an adaptor that is set to a specific torque.
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Ralph Mowery wrote:

"Should" being the operative word round here, (t'other side of the Pond).
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