What would be a decent set of 'loaner-tools'?

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I moved into my house a year or so ago, and the neighbors are starting to notice the tools on the peg-board, tool chests, etc in the garage.
So one comes over a few days ago to borrow an 8mm wrench, the first one I could find was a nice Kobalt (the kind made by a company owned by Snap-On Williams?), now made by ????)...
Well, you know the story, he can't remember where he put it, yada, yada, yada...
So my question is, what would be a half-way decent (non-dangerous, don't want to get sued if the tool breaks) set of 'loaner' tools? Or should I be a pri$k, and not loan out tools period?
My Dad is a 'Craftsman' man, and I will inherit a sweet set of '40s-'50s Craftsman tools someday, but for the least amount of outlay, what would be a safe and decent set of 'no-tears' tools if they get borrowed or lost? Can I trust a Harbor Freight set, or should I snatch up a Craftsman set on sale?
I will get a cheap tool chest to put them in, keep that ONE unlocked, and pretty much let the neighbors help themselves when they ask to borrow a tool...
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Why would you be "cheap" (or anything for that matter) if you decide not to loan stuff to irresponsible people? If the neighbors behave like clueless 4 year olds and can't be trusted with stuff then do what you do with a 4 year old. Lock the stuff up.

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You want to BUY some tools to loan out???
Can I borrow your car??
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I will get repaid, like when I need one to walk my dog, or pick up the papers while on vacation, etc...
You give a little, and (hopefully) get a little..
I grew up in an era when you lived in a neighborhood, not a house on a street surrounded by anonymous neighbors...
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Yeah. Same here. But I also grew up with neighbors that respected your property.
I understand your point, but I still don't see why YOU have to buy tools so your NEIGHBORS can "borrow" them. Maybe find what type of tools they really want and give them to them as a gift???
OR
How about having a "check out tag" where they would fill in there name and date and hang it on the peg board?
Oh. I still need to borrow your car....
;-]
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Well, like I said, I will need favors from them sometimes too...
I tell you, it is priceless to have a neighbor you trust, walk your dog while away, keep an eye on your house, etc...
I figure losing a few 'cheaper' tools along the way is probably a cheap price to pay in the long run.
We will see, I am still not sure of most of the neighbors, but the guy who lost my 8mm wrench did let me borrow his lawn-mower once when mine was in the shop (I shoulda told him I can't remember where I put it :-)
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

You can certainly trust the neighbor who lost your 8mm wrench, trust him to lose your 9mm too ;)
--
Free men own guns, slaves don\'t
www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/5357/
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I think you're on the right track, unlike most here.
Buy Craftsman. Cheap enough, and when an honest neighbor loses a tool, he / she will know where to get the replacement.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I also lived in a neighborhood that was, er, neighborly. Still do. I have a different take on it. If someone can't take care of your tools, why would you believe that they'd be any better with your dog, house, papers...? If someone isn't trustworthy with small responsibilities, why graduate them to more important tasks? How's that go? Fool me once, shame on you, fool me twice, shame on me.
R
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Harbor Freight is fine for lender tools. If you are thinking you may get sued for helping someone, well then don't help them. There is always a risk in helping people. I heard of this case where the guy gave another person CPR after they collapsed from heart attack and accidently broke a rib. The person lived and sued the guy for breaking the rib. Well, if that person is your neighbor, move or don't associate with them. Also, if you want to have a brand on hand to loan out, go to Sears and have a look at what they have. It used to be Craftsman is Craftsman, but now you have something like 3 different Craftsman types. The cheapest being a Chineese made number and the cost is similar to Harbor Freight.
Another thing is eBay. I have gotten many used Snap-On tools in very good shape for fraction of the price of new. Just take a look. I keep them for myself, but if I lost one, I would not be too heartbroken since I did not pay an arm for it. So there are options. You can also tell the borrower that this particular tool is valuable and you want it back as it means a lot to you. There is no shame in stating that and the borrower will more than likely respond well to something like that. In many cases people who are not that handy (and that is why they need to borrow tools in the first place) have no idea that a wrench or a screwdriver can be different from one another. This does not mean they are idiots or anything, just ignorant. I am sure they are knoweledgeable in something that you are ignorant about and will be surprised that you don't know that one 37 stamp may be worth a lot more than other, for example. So, ploitely educating the borrower usually works, but not always.
Good luck, Vladimir
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--SNIP for brevity- I heard of this case where the guy gave another person CPR after they collapsed from heart attack and accidently broke a rib. The person lived and sued the guy for breaking the rib
Folks have tried that, however almost all states have good smaritan laws these days, and you are protected. Providing you have CPR training.
Most courts, if not the plantiffs, realize that the person needing CPR was dying. Broken rib is a small price to pay.
BTW I'd go with Thorsen or Mechanics Choice. Available at Wally World or local discount parts houses. Both have lifetime warranty against breakage, so if the neighbor brings it back busted, you can get a replacement.
-alex
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Well the Good Samaritan laws are designed to cover people with training, but that doesn't mean that the people without training are in more trouble.
Rather, it was the other way around. If you dind't know anything or all you knew about cpr was from a half page flier, you were judged as someone who doesn't know anything, and even if you did things badly, you weren't liable (unless you were trying to hurt someone.)
Doctors otoh had I think in a few cases been held to the standard of doctors. They had to do things right, to the same standard they would be required to use in a hospital (minus the equipment). They were the ones who were afraid to help, because some (and I'm sure in cases where there was a bad result, like the patient died) doctors were successfully sued, and other doctors were afraid of that . The ones sued had been doing their best probably, but a jury thought somehow that wasn't good enough. Or they weren't doing their best, but doctors who read the paper were sure they had been.
But if the average Joe tries to help someone, he is and was judged according to hisown level of competence. Was he negligent even compared to what HE could have done. For example, did he run up to help the guy, and everyone thought he was helping and left, and then he decided, No I don't have time after all and he left the guy alone.. I'm not sure now, but I think a laymen who didn't even act like a layman might be liable, if there were other people there who might have done a better job, and somehow he got them to rely on HIM.
And I think a doctor would be liable under such an extreme scenario too. Apparently there were many good-hearted (normal) doctors who really wanted to help before and were for good reason afraid of multi-million dollar suits if they didn't get it right.

Darn right.
Of course on tv, they rarely check if the person needs cpr to begin with. One is supposed to check for faint breathing, and for a faint pulse before trying to supplement those things. OTOH, I've never been able to find my pulse.

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I'm sure if you keep asking the guy, "Can you look again for my 8mm wrench?", he'll stop asking to borrow your tools.
I just don't understand some people. If I would have lost someone's wrench I would have bought them a new one. They didn't give it to me, they were loaning it and those are the rules.
Mike
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Ummm ......did you ask him to replace it!!!
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First keep your garage door closed. When I traveled frequently below the border I would visit Harbor Freight and get a set of tools including a tool box. More than once I was "man-handled" into giving them the tools. My boss was pretty miffed at the concept but when he found out what my SK or Snap On stuff cost he was elated.
We had to do an ugly transformer job a couple of year ago. The only 13/16 inch wrench that did not break was from HF. Granted the craftsman was replaced, but when your 150 miles into the desert at a mine, broke is broke.
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I've had a lot of people say that Harbor Freight has "throw away tools" and aren't very good for anything except light duty jobs. But I'll tell you what:
I first heard of HF about 25 years ago and I bought a set of 16(?) screwdrivers from them. I think back then they were less than $15 including S&H. I have bought dozens of them since then (Stanley, Snap On, Craftsmen) but I STILL have all of the HF ones and they are all in good shape except for one: The set came with a big straight slot with a big handle called a "two fister". I used it one time to bust up concrete and the handle broke in half. Blade is still intact......
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I 'putter-around in the garage alot, and it gets awfully hot in there in a FL summer with the garage door closed ;-)
I will see if I can find a Harbor Freight around locally. I have heard horror stories about them, but if I can fondle the tools before I buy, I might feel better about buying them.
Thanks all!
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Quite a few stores in Florida:
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/retail_stores.taf#FL
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote in

Jacksonville,Orlando,Casselberry(Orlo suburb) are Florida ones I know of.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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Stick to tools without moving parts. HF wrenches are fine (drop forged hardened steel but not precision machined) but things like channel locks and wire cutters are junk.
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