What's the life of a carbon monoxide detector?

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Our house is 14 years old. This morning, we all woke up feeling dizzy and lightheaded. The kids and adults ate different food last night, and we all feel like this.
So I'm paranoid. I'm going to go get a new CO detector.
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On Apr 28, 11:43 am, Mitch@_._ wrote:

Thay dont have to alarm to get sick, get one with digital read out and memory button, It should read zero or you have issues, they dont alarm till a certain amount is reached for a period of time, just check the peak level every day, if it goes to even 20 I would start looking.
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On Mon, 28 Apr 2008 16:43:24 GMT, Mitch@_._ wrote:

Came home with a new detector. No alrams. But I'm curious, what are sources of CO in a home?
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go to google. search for "residential carbon monoxide sources"
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I know the gas company will come out if you smell gas, but will they come out and check for CO if we all feel sick?
My dizzyness has turned to nausea.
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On 4/28/2008 12:58 PM Mitch@_._ spake thus:

That sure sounds like CO poisoning to me. (Don't ask me how I know that.)
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How do you kn...... oh, nevermind.
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On 4/30/2008 10:11 AM Stormin Mormon spake thus:

(Asked in reply to statement about how I know that dizziness and nausea are sure signs of CO poisoning.)
Story is I was working for a guy out in the country and staying at his place. One morning we both woke up feeling like shit, massive headaches, both wandered outside separately and puked. Turns out he had just gotten a new propane-powered fridge that he'd neglected to vent properly. Phew!
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Mitch@_._ wrote:

If you are nauseous and suspect CO, I would not spend another night in the house.
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Beebop down to the Borg and get a digital. It will tell you in sixty seconds what your CO level is, even if it's three points under the danger level, which the audible only won't. It's your life. Spend ten bucks more.
Steve
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On Mon, 28 Apr 2008 21:59:16 -0800, "SteveB"

I have "Nighthawk" digital readout CO detectors on each level of the house. I replace them at around 10 years. These are plug in and have battery backup. I cycle the older ones to the attic, basement, and garage. My hard-wired smoke detectors are over 20 years old, but still work fine. I know that because the SWMBO attempts to cook something once in awhile. I think WalMart has the recommended "Nighthawk" CO detector with digital readout, about $40. Use the upholstery vacuum attachment and dust off and test detectors once a year.
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Open the windows for an hour. Let in some fresh air. See if that helps. It may be a very low grade toxic, and blowing the house out may give you a couple days relief.
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On Apr 30, 1:12 pm, "Stormin Mormon"

The life of a carbon monoxide detector is empty and meaningless.
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Mitch@_._ wrote:

Sounds like the flu
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LouB wrote:

Then you call FD.
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On Apr 28, 12:38 pm, Mitch@_._ wrote:

You have to let it operate 24 hours, a animal in a chimney, bad flue pipes, bad furnace, defective heating cause it.
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On Mon, 28 Apr 2008 17:38:52 GMT, Mitch@_._ wrote:

Anything that has an internal combustion engine, gas appliances, or anything that burns. There is a small amount of CO present in the air and it is in equilibrium with carbon dioxide. Pouring water on hot coals will produce a lot of CO.
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Hope you didn't screw up already. Did you buy one with the digital display or not?
Lets say the threshold limit is 400 parts per million, or whatever it is for CO.
Lets say you have a concentration of 389ppm. It's not going to alert. But wouldn't you want to know if there was ANY CO around so you could find the source before it got to bad levels. That's the problems with most of those detectors. They usually go off after you're passed out. Even the properly working ones with digital readouts will give you readings from traffic, a car entering or leaving your garage, a wood stove that's perfectly vented, and other things. But you do want to know what the level is before it reaches the critical stage.
Steve
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SteveB wrote:

You're not entirely correct. A CO detector with a digital display is preferable for tracking intermittent sources and general peace of mind. It is not true however that a detector is not going to alert for a CO reading slightly under a threshold. CO detectors use a time weighted alarm model and will alarm very fast for really high levels and with more of a delay for lower levels. The threshold where they really won't alarm at all is very low. The paperwork that comes with the detectors generally lists the threshold levels and times, or you can find it on the manufacturers sites.
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Good guess! The following is from the FirstAlert website:
Current UL Standard 2034 limits for CO alarms to sound are: • 30ppm for 30 days • 150ppm for 10-50 minutes • 70ppm for 60-240 minutes • 400ppm for 4-15 minutes
Any alarm that meets the UL standard needs to alarm at the above cumulative levels.
As far as checking things out, I would think the Fire Department would respond to a call to check for CO.
Jerry
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