Carbon Monoxide Detector

A neighbour bought a detector and asked me to fit it. As her Combi is in an upstairs airing cupboard, I fitted the detector in the cupboard (the door isn't especially soundproof) Would you agree with this - or would you take the view that it should be in a habitated area - such as in the hallway.
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On 24/10/2013 19:03, DerbyBorn wrote:

Interesting. Density of CO is nominally the same as air.
I guess the correct place is where it visible and a habitable area, close to the potential source of CO.
I also believe that a full airing cupboard may have limited airflow, so it would be impossible to second guess the position of highest concentration.
Aren't there rules about placing combustible materials in the same enclosed space? Don't such enclosed spaces with boilers need fireproof doors? I recall a tale where a door was removed to satisfy regulations! (And promptly put back!)
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writes

Snip NO! -CO is a bit more than half the density of air. Town gas was largely CO and was sometimes used to fill balloons although the 'lifting power' was less than hydrogen. Hence a good idea to locate a CO detector high up.
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On 24/10/2013 23:14, Chris Holford wrote:

Are you sure?
Density of Carbon Monoxide http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_monoxide 1.145 kg/m3 at 25 °C
Density of air http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Density_of_air At sea level and at 15 °C, air has a density of approximately 1.225 kg/m3 At 20 °C and 101.325 kPa, dry air has a density of 1.2041 kg/m3.
Extrapolating I assume air will have a density of 1.183 kg/m3 at 25°C
It really isn't enough to make much difference.
Are you getting confused with the hydrogen content of town gas? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:TOWN_GAS
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writes

Oops! I should have checked before posting! When I looked it up I was surprised to see that hydrogen was such a large component of coal gas; well I've learnt something.
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wrote:

Town gas was mainly H2 and CH4.
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Town/coal gas is lighter than air because it is mostly hydrogen.
I only ever heard of CO detectors being recomended for conventional flued appliances (ie with chimneys)
Seems pointless for a room sealed appliance.
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Seals fail sometimes...
Tim
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snipped-for-privacy@ntlworld.com says...

The destructions on one I bought recently stated it should be mounted, not closer than 2 metres and not further than 4 metres, from the probable source of CO.
So I assume the hallway would best fit that.
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On 24/10/2013 19:44, Sam Plusnet wrote:

What I have done is looked at where the sources of CO could be and which areas of the house are frequently habitated.
I then bought 4 interconnectable CO detectors.
one went by the combi boiler in kitchen which vents outside via a horizontal flue.
another went by the wood burner which also happens to be the lounge and there is a chimney stack for the wood burner.
Another went in the master bedroom (Which happens to be above the lounge) simply because we sleep in there AND there is a chminey stack by the bed where said fumes from wood burner pass through.
the last one went in the loft near the wall where the chimney stack continues up. This is in case the chimnet stack ever leaks into the loft.
The lot is all interconnected and there is also a connection into the house alarm panel via a spare 24 hour zone.
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Our boiler is in the loft. British Gas fitted the detector in the hallway...............................
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On 24/10/2013 21:14, Mr Pounder wrote:

Probably the best place if you only have one detector.
Having CO in the loft probably won't hurt you, having it in the bedrooms probably will.
IMO you need more than one.
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Woops, it's a bungalow.
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On 24/10/2013 21:37, Emanuel Labour wrote:

How does that affect anything?
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