What's .001 uufd ?

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Isn't it amazing - how much we all "sort of" resemble or try to emulate - Uncle Fester - Addamms Family! I recall a toy store next to my house as a child used to sell a "light bulb" you could stick in your mouth to make it light up - like Uncle Fester. Those were the good ole days - "before" learning "safety".
I recall a time, I had an <tube type> H.F. rig needing repaired. The damned volt probe kept slipping off the post with clip installed. I knew to keep one hand out or else. Well, I said to myself mentally (the angel on my shoulder speaking) - dummy - you're going to get lit up if you stick both your hands in there to hold those probes in place. BUT - (the devil on my other shoulder prodding me on) I didn't heed my own advice and I did just that - stuck both hands in. YEP - sure as hell - I got lit up. Served me right. Man, that tickled worse than the "Light socket". Didn't have to kick myself in the ass - the shock did a good enough job.
I still get a tingle now and then, but not like I used to. I take less chances. Too old to do that stuff now. Don't know how many more ticks the ole hearts clock has left in it, don't want to short circuit them.
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I can remember making a Jacob's ladder with a oil burner transformer, and sticking all manner of objects into the resulting arc to see what would happen - paper would get holes punched through it and sometimes catch fire, etc. One day I held a pencil by the eraser end (metal) into the arc. Of course, the high voltage traveled up the inside of the pencil and discharged to the metal end I was holding (duh!) Naturally, I didn't attempt THAT one again...
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You ain't seen a Jacobs Ladder till you see this one that shoots 100 feet in the air from a 500KV. Go to: http://205.243.100.155/frames/longarc.htm Then watch the video called "This is the record holder for the world's largest unintentional Jacob's Ladder!".
Of course look at the others too. I love this website !!!!
By the way, I used to play with neon light transformers. They can really kick butt !!!!
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ROFLMAO - that was funny. Not then, but boy how we can laugh at ourselves now - eh?
L.
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Yup, the ones of us who lived! ;)
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Just because "all the tubes light up" - doesn't mean anything. Any tube can light up and still fail to perform properly. Your issue - description "seems" to suggest a "Power Supply" issue ("maybe") - not feeding voltage to RF/IF/Audio stages and not enough going to the leg to feed the "High Voltage" section to supply the picture tube. Of course - with an old set - most anything could be wrong and it could also be multiple issues. But the best place to start - is the Power Supply from the AC in - checking voltages to see where they cease to be normal. A schematic would really help tracing voltages - hopefully you can read it. Taking voltages can be dangerous if you're not familiar with doing so. Get someone near you who has experience - if you have no experience, you/your family will be a lot safer for it. Getting the RF/IF/Audio stages of the set working may not be so tough - just hope the "picture tube" is still working to give you a picture! Good luck - and BE CAREFUL.
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probably .001 microfarads, some old printing used an extreme left drop serif before the U of the UF.
or even a inverted M/m to signify the MicroFarad.
agreed, theres usually 250-600 volts at very substantial current scattered around inside this older units, and the older the insulation gets on those wires, the least it will protect u!
i applaud u for trying to fix this, you will be a "specialist" if you are successful, as most of those old timers are rapidly dying off!
antiques? heck we all become antiques after awhile ;-))
at least this kool stuff remains, we either get buried semi-intact or flashed into ashes!

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Meat Plow wrote:

Almost certainly microfarad. it would be 1 nF.
The use of 'MFD' was only ever a US phenomenon.
Graham
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Eeyore wrote:

Sure it was.
--
Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I\'ve got my DD214 to
prove it.
  Click to see the full signature.
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On Wed, 01 Aug 2007 02:51:13 -0500, fartblanket wrote:

Marking standards were all over the map in the early days. MFD would have been MicroFarads, but by todays standards a capital "M" would indicate MegaFarads, which is an unlikely size...
MMF or MMFD usually indicated MicroMicroFarads, which today we call PicoFarads. I do not recall having seen uufd, but by description it is almost certainly .001 MicroFarads (1000 PicoFarads), probably silver mica and they don't usually go bad unless badly abused.
The "dominoes" were an early molded packaging scheme that isn't used anymore. Usually red or brown and the dots color code for value.

Many of these multi-section electrolytics were made to order, and almost no one does things this way anymore. Try Antique Electronics Supply for some similar generic parts. There used to be a couple companies that would repack the original cans for a hefty fee. If you just want to get it to play, you can figure a way to mount three individual caps of similar value.

Some early makers used an electromagnet (the extra coil), which may also do double duty as a supply filter inductor, and when the filter caps get bad they hum quite a bit. Almost everyone eventually settled on the permanent magnet setup to simplify wiring, replacement, etc.
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You have a mica capacitor. THe dots are the color code for its value. Unfortunately I have long forgotten how to read it. http://www.tpub.com/neets/book2/3f.htm http://www.tpub.com/neets/book2/3g.htm
The speaker is an electrodynamic speaker and derives its magnetic field from an electromagnet. If I remember right the coil is usually part of the power supply filter network (combined with that filter capacitor that is leaking). THis was in the days before they had powerful fixed magnets http://radioremembered.org/edspeaker.htm
As someone has already said, the electrolytic can be replaced with individual aluminum electrolytics of the right value and voltage. You can go high in voltage but not lower. You might try these sources: http://www.allelectronics.com/index.html http://safe.dhwd.com/cgi-bin/debco/index.html http://www.mcmelectronics.com / http://www.mouser.com/index.cfm?handler=home

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While argument goes on, on pico micro and so on. This three capacitor above you can make up of three different ones all you need to remembered that all three have same common -leg as you have them listed, one combine unit I don't believe you will find if you do find one $40.00 bucks is not outrageous.
Small cap is must likely ceramic device color code will be voltage rating and % value I think to know for sure you need to know MFG. it can be substituted with silver mica 300VDC or higher.

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On Wed, 01 Aug 2007 02:51:13 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The u's are either mu's or they are u's used to represent mu's, the Greek letter that micro begins with.

But there's no reason to think it is bad, right? You're just asking about the value.

Go to www.arrl.com and look for hamfests in your area. They're on Sunday mornings, and once in while Sat. and Sunday. Lots of used stuff and guys to talk to, including some with tube testers.
Or look for ham radio clubs on the same webpage.

If you can't get 80's, you can use two 40's or four 20's, etc. You can go higher on the mfd's, but no lower on the voltage.
I needed soemthing like yours for my 1930 Hallicrafters radio. The original cap lasted 60 years, which I think is pretty good. But I couldn't find what I needed in 1 or even 2 pieces.

Even when they don't leak, if there is a loud hum coming from the speaker, it's probably the power supply filter capacitor. It's after the diodes (tube or transistor) and before the rest of the radio/tv.
It takes the 60 cycle hum out of the power supply. Since the AC has been rectified, the hum is 120 cycles per second. If someone can tell one tone from another, you can tell for sure (although I'm sure without getting out of my chair.)

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