what kind of oil to use...

I've inherited a rather old Snapper riding mower with a B&S 4hp engine. I don't have an owner's manual for it, and I need to know what sort of oil to put into it. Should I use the same oil that I'd put in my regular push mower, 30 sae straight-grade viscocity oil?
TIA, Brigitte
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www.snapper.com. Go to "contact us" and ask them.
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right..use 30w detergent (HD) oil. lucas the mower man.
http://www.minibite.com/america/malone.htm
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If it still has good oil-control (doesn't leak or burn much), I'd go for one of the higher-vi synthetics. Makes for a "happy" engine, IMHO.
J
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snipped-for-privacy@sme-online.com wrote:

engines. It can stand heat a lot better than conventional oils. Don't worry about the 5 rating. That is only when very cold. When warm it still has 30 weight viscosity and is a bit easier to start.
I have a 45 year old B&S engine that runs like new using it.
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I think Briggs reccomends a good brand of 10W30. Penzoil and Castrol are good.
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Christopher A. Young
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Every mower I've had recommended straight 30 wt.
Bob
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Bob wrote:

Not any more. They all say multi-weight is also good except that since air cooled engines run hotter than others the oil level should be checked more often. The solution for that is to use synthetic which will stand up even better than straight weight. Synthetic is really considered to be like a straight weight except it doesn't get as thick when it gets cold, therefore can meet the multi-weight classification.
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small engines haven't changed. The only reason they are recommending the multigrades is for emissions ratings. Also, it is more likely someone will have a multigrade on their shelf than a straight weight. Small engines use straight 30.
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"Rich256" < snipped-for-privacy@nospam.net> wrote in message
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Steve Barker LT wrote:

is a straight weight. That is the way it is made. It doesn't get as thick when it gets cold and is far superior for small hot running engines. It doesn't have all or need those Viscosity Improvers used to make conventional multi-grade.
Just take a look at the manufacturers literature and you will see they even say multi-grade conventional is OK.
http://www.briggsandstratton.com/display/router.asp?docidd066
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http://www.briggsandstratton.com/display/router.asp?docidd066
Go to the source.
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Christopher A. Young
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Just everyday straight 30 will be fine. That's all i run in over 100 pieces of small eq, and 33 trucks at the landscaping co i work for.
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Steve Barker


"Brigitte" < snipped-for-privacy@rocketmail.com> wrote in message
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