What does chain saw oil oil?

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I probably should have asked this question years ago, but I just thought of it.
My 15", 3.25 HP Craftsman electric chainsaw has a built-in oiler, if one pushes the rubber bulb with his thumb. But the oil chamber leaks so I've been using aerosol oil. It's made mostly for motorcycle chains, but I was told it's good for chainsaws too.
What is it I'm supposed to be oiling? The rubbing area between the bar and the chain? Or the chain's teeth where they rub on the wood being cut? Or both?
I always thought it was the first, but with that cottonwood tree hanging over my yard (and now lying in the yard) I've probably done as much cutting in two days as in the previous 10 years, so I shoulld know the right answer by now.
(Actually, I would fill the oil chamber since I'm using the saw so much right now -- even when it leaks out it only makes a little mess, but it's empty again next time I need it -- , but I can't find the non-aerosol chain oil and I keep forgetting to look again.)
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The oil is supposed to end up on the chain.
Recently I made a trip to our local hardware store and they had no chain oil in stock. I did some Googling around and read that vegetable oil works. And it does seem to work pretty well.
Another thing I noticed after cleaning up some of the mess from Sandy, frequent sharpening of the blade is a good idea.
--
Dan Espen

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Most any kind of oil can be used. As it goes into the enviroment, you really should use some that is biodegradable ( or what ever the buzz word is ). It should not harm the enviroment.
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That's pretty much what I found through Google. Not only does the oil end up in the environment, it also ends up on your face and clothes.
Vegetable oil seems like a good choice.
--
Dan Espen

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wrote:

This chain oil is marked, I forget the words, but something that means it doesn't get thrown off the chain. And that seems to be the case, it doesn't get on me. But of course, it doesn't stay on the saw forever or I wouldn't need to add more. I guess I can use PAM. It's mostly canola oil. Origin of the name "Product of Arthur Meyerhoff"

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On Sat, 15 Jun 2013 21:43:51 -0400, "Ralph Mowery"

Can I use PAM? I've been using the same aerosol can of PAM for 30 years now, since I only use it hoping the snow won't stick to the snow shovel. Finishing this can is on my bucket list.
(Recently I finished a box of baking soda I've had in my 'fridge for 30 years. My 'fridge allegedly has a special surface that doesn't absorb odors (enamel?) so I only used the baking soda to clean car batteries. The rest of the time it just sits in the fridge. I'm so happy to be rid of it. )

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I doubt Pam will soak far enough in, to lube the rivets and the bar surface. Just a SWAG.
I've heard of people use a spray can of teflon lube, give it a squirt every several seconds during cutting. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
Can I use PAM? I've been using the same aerosol can of PAM for 30 years now, since I only use it hoping the snow won't stick to the snow shovel. Finishing this can is on my bucket list.
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On 6/16/2013 9:44 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Had an experience several years ago where I used an old can of Teflon mold release to lube my bicycle chain. After a few weeks, the chain started to rust. Apparently no oil in it to protect the chain from moisture.
I believe in using a product designed for the use.
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On Sun, 16 Jun 2013 09:52:25 -0400, Frank

Makes sense. Despite what a couple guys here said, I decided against vegetable oil in general. Might be slippery at room temperatures, but the chain gets a lot hotter. Maybe it shouldn't but it does.
BTW, I remember now. This saw didnt' cut when I got it at the yard sale. I wasn't in one of my stupid periods and I figured out pretty quickly that the chain was on backwards, despite my lack of experience.
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30

So what? Vegetable oil isn't slippery anymore just because it gets hotter? I still have an old gallon of Stihl bar oil from decades ago. Says right on the container it's soybean oil. I'm sure they put some other additives in it to improve the performance. I wouldn't put straight veg oil in a brand new Stihl that I was using everyday. But for some crappy old electric craftsman, that is leaking oil, has a manual oil system, that I picked up for $10 at a yard sale, I sure would.
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Glad I'm not the only one to do that backwards chain snafu.
I also heard of a worker who smoked a drill bit badly. Turns out hubby had been using the drill to remove screws, and it was spinning left. Most drill bits go right, in the northern hemisphere. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
Makes sense. Despite what a couple guys here said, I decided against vegetable oil in general. Might be slippery at room temperatures, but the chain gets a lot hotter. Maybe it shouldn't but it does.
BTW, I remember now. This saw didnt' cut when I got it at the yard sale. I wasn't in one of my stupid periods and I figured out pretty quickly that the chain was on backwards, despite my lack of experience.
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On Sunday, June 16, 2013 10:30:48 PM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I've never ever had anybody hand me a drill without reversing it first. So I return the favor every chance I get. It's part of the Guy Code.
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I handed a battery powered drill to a woman mechanic where I worked with it set in reverse.She was not hitting on much as the smarts go, but got the job as part of the political system. She only had to drill one 1/4 inch hole in some cast iron about 1/4 of an inch thick. She drilled for a while and then mentioned something about a switch on the top of the drill. I told here to turn it. It was a speed switch. It slowed down . After about 30 seconds she said it was not doing as good as the first way, so I told her to turn it back.
It looked like it was going to rain ( we were outside) so I told her to look under the drill at the other switch (the reversing one) and change it and see what hapens. She finally did get the hole drilled. There were several others looking on and snikering at her.
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The oil does a couple things: Lubes where the chain touches the bar. Lubes the rivets, when the chain curves around the sprocket, and around the tip.
The bar oil that's made for that is a bit sticky, so it stays on better. I've heard that new motor oil is acceptable if needed. Used crank case oil will wear out the bar and chain, it's full of abrasive metal pieces.
Eco friendly is good. Be sure to use an oil that has come out of the ground, as it's going back into the ground. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
Most any kind of oil can be used. As it goes into the enviroment, you really should use some that is biodegradable ( or what ever the buzz word is ). It should not harm the enviroment.
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On Sunday, June 16, 2013 9:42:02 AM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

e metal pieces.
Bullshit.
If used motor oil were full of abrasive metal pieces, your car's engine wou ldn't have run long enough to get the oil warmed up to change it the last t ime!
The used motor oil was good enough for a close-tolerance multi-cylinder rec iprocating engine 5 minutes before you dumped it. It is surely adequate for a sloppy-fitting chain riding in a track and being subjected to all sorts of contamination and abuse 5 minutes AFTER you dumped it.
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On Jun 17, 8:05 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

ive metal pieces.

ouldn't have run long enough to get the oil warmed up to change it the last time!

eciprocating engine 5 minutes before you dumped it. It is surely adequate f or a sloppy-fitting chain riding in a track and being subjected to all sort s of contamination and abuse 5 minutes AFTER you dumped it.
Thanks for posting that. I have seen the "full of abrasives and metal pieces" many times and thought it was pretty asinine.
Harry K
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On 6/17/2013 11:05 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

wouldn't have run long enough to get the oil warmed up to change it the last time!

reciprocating engine 5 minutes before you dumped it. It is surely adequate for a sloppy-fitting chain riding in a track and being subjected to all sorts of contamination and abuse 5 minutes AFTER you dumped it.

Using old drain oil is penny wise and pound foolish! But hey, it's your saw!
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That's a brief, and to the point way to describe it. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .

multi-cylinder reciprocating engine 5 minutes before you dumped it. It is surely adequate for a sloppy-fitting chain riding in a track and being subjected to all sorts of contamination and abuse 5 minutes AFTER you dumped it.

Using old drain oil is penny wise and pound foolish! But hey, it's your
saw!
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My anecdotal evidence is that my friend Jerry, used to live a couple hours drive south of me. He used bar oil, and the neighbor used crank case oil. The neighbor's chains wore out a lot faster. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
On Sunday, June 16, 2013 9:42:02 AM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

abrasive metal pieces.
Bullshit.
If used motor oil were full of abrasive metal pieces, your car's engine wouldn't have run long enough to get the oil warmed up to change it the last time!
The used motor oil was good enough for a close-tolerance multi-cylinder reciprocating engine 5 minutes before you dumped it. It is surely adequate for a sloppy-fitting chain riding in a track and being subjected to all sorts of contamination and abuse 5 minutes AFTER you dumped it.
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wrote:

s drive south of me. He used bar oil, and the neighbor used crank case oil. The neighbor's chains wore out a lot faster.

ive metal pieces.

ouldn't have run long enough to get the oil warmed up to change it the last time!

eciprocating engine 5 minutes before you dumped it. It is surely adequate f or a sloppy-fitting chain riding in a track and being subjected to all sort s of contamination and abuse 5 minutes AFTER you dumped it.
Now there is firm scientific evidence...but mine cancels yours. I use bar oil and my chains wear out faster than my neighbors. Iwond if my cutting 10+ cord/yr and him only using his saw to trim stuff around the yard would have anything to do with it...hmmm?
Anecdotal evidence is only good for laughs.
Harry K
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