What do you put on a brown wood door facing the sun & rain?

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I like the shadow effect. I would make it permanent.
Greg
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x-no-archive: yes
what a beautiful door :)
Mike Lalonde - M&K Sudbury Ontario
"Tony Palermo" wrote in message
Norminn wrote:

Yes. South. Sun all day. Rain blows in with wind. Always sun. Always rain. So I need best protection I can give the door. Plus it must be darker.
Here is the picture taken just now showing it already being wet outside. http://www.freeimagehosting.net/7et4h
I see you said not to use water based. I will use what people suggest so no water based varnish.
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On Tue, 10 Dec 2013 12:07:10 -0500, "Michael Lalonde"

For what its worth - Assuming the door is in good shape (which it looks) and is the color/hue that you desire, I'd put numerous coats of "Helmsman" varnish on it with very light sanding in between. This is a marine type varish and offers great protection from water and sun rays. With sufficient coatings it will las a long, long time.
Most home stores have it. I believe its "Minwax Helsman"
Good luck.
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Norminn wrote:

Here is the picture of the floorboard. http://www.freeimagehosting.net/ntemf I do not know what is on there but it does not seem like it is paint. It seems like a stain or a varnish or a sealer or a lacquer or something?
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Tony Palermo wrote:

That's a threshold (aka "sill")
--

dadiOH
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dadiOH wrote:

Here is what that sill is. http://www.freeimagehosting.net/5btfn
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Tony Palermo:
If it were me, I would use a coating that's called "Marine Varnish" by some people, and "Spar" Varnish" by others. You should be able to buy it in any paint store, but any marinas in your area will certainly carry it.
Marine/Spar varnish is similar to an alkyd based polyurethane, but it doesn't dry as hard and is very much more naturally resistant to UV light from the Sun.
You can buy alkyd based polyurethanes that have lots of UV blockers in them for use outdoors as well, but I don't know about their hardness. With hardness comes rigidity, and wood is a natural material that swells and shrinks with changes in it's moisture content caused by seasonal changes in temperature and humidity. So, if it were me, I'd use a product that's naturally UV resistant and and dries softer than regular interior polyurethane SO THAT it retains enough elasticity to stretch and shrink with wood outdoors.
I looked at your picture.
If it wuz me, I would use a paint stripper like PolyStrippa to remove what's left of the peeling coating on your exterior doors. I suspect the coating is peeling because someone used an interior oil based coating on that wood, and the coating isn't soft enough to stretch and shrink with your wood. Then, if those orangy stains come off with the coating, you might only have to sand those black stains out.
You then need to get a wood stain mixed up at any paint store to match the stain you have now, and use that to restain your THRESHOLD (not "bottom floorboard") and any areas where you sanded the stain off the same colour as what you have now.
Then apply multiple coats of Spar/Marine varnish.
I'd also ask at the paint store or marina where you buy the spar varnish whether they have a "wiping" marine varnish. Wiping "varnishes" or "polyurethanes" are made with much smaller resins than regular "brush on" varnishes or polyurethanes, and that means that they're not nearly as viscous as regular varnishes or polyurethanes. The advantage to that is that they won't leave brush strokes on your wood even if you paint them on with a corn broom. They're meant to be applied to a dry rag and wiped onto the wood surfaces being varnished.
(Keep your wiping rag in a plastic bag to slow the rate at which the wiping spar varnish cures with the oxygen in the air to form a solid. No matter what you do, the spar varnish will absorb oxygen as long as the rag is exposed to the air, and that oxygen will cause the spar varnish to solidify even when the rag is wrapped in plastic. But, wrapping it in plastic will at least allow you to use the same rag 3 or 4 times, rather than just once. Use a clean WHITE rag as any dyed cotton rags could discolour your varnish.)
--
nestork


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I recently came up against a door with similar finish issues. I took the door down and used a belt sander with 80 grit to take all the existing finish off then used a palm sander with 120-180 grit to smooth it out. Next, after vacuuming, I rubbed it down with laquer thinner and applied 3-4 coats of "Helmsman" clear varnish waiting overnight between coats. It came out great and it still looks like the day it was done. But its only been a little over a year.
At least this is one idea. Good luck.
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Bob F wrote:

I like the spar varnish idea.
Can I just add stain to the spar varnish to make it match the dark? http://www.freeimagehosting.net/ojz5l
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On Fri, 7 Dec 2012 01:48:51 +0000 (UTC), Tony Palermo

There's no reason to match the dark unless you like that on the outside. It's very nice wood, so take your time and see what looks best to you. Sometimes nice wood grain show best with a light stain. I had a similar entryway door and never touched it in the 14 years I lived there, and it still looked good. That peeling (I've heard it called "cellophaning") probably means water-based, and you don't want to use that. As other have said, use an oil-based "marine" varnish. I've read that a scraper and heat gun can help to remove cellophaning varnish, so you can minimize sanding work. That wood still looks to be in good shape so it looks like a fun project. You should be very pleased with the results of your work.
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Tony Palermo wrote:

I wouldn't use spar varnish as it is softer. I mentioned Z-Spar varnish but that is a brand name, not a type.

You could add universal coloring material to give color to the varnish but I wouln't add stain, too much cance for incompatibility.
In fact, I wouldn't stain at all. If you do and if you ever have to repair an area you will wish you had not stained. Varnish itself will darken the wood and give a lovely color.
You have a couple of black areas on the outside casing near the bottom. That is because the wood pieces are wicking up water; eventually (if not already) they will rot. Cutting off 1/8 - 1/4" from the bottoms will keep them from wicking up water.
Your sill is always going to be a problem as the constant wear from goings and comings will wear the finish much faster than the finish on the door and trim. If you ever get a chance, I'd replace the sill with tile as you have in the entry. That would be a fairly major job so not one you should undertake; if you ever need/want to change out the door and side lights, consider doing it then.
--

dadiOH
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dadiOH wrote:

I changed my mind...a marine spar varnish may give you some benefit. Any finish tends to crack at joints between boards going different directions (up/down - side/side) because the boards expand and contract in different directions. Spar varnish is more flexible so it *may* help that.
FYI, "spar" and "marine" are not synonymous. You can have spar varnish that is not marine and vice versa. The thing that makes a varnish "spar" is a greater amount of oil. More oil equals more flexibility and less hardness. The primary purpose of spar varnish was for - surprise - spars so that they could bend without cracking the finish. Somehow, with the help of certain manufacturers, people have come to believe that it is a superior varnish for all things. That is not true.
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dadiOH wrote:

I had not thought of the word but this is what wikipedia says.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Varnish#Spar_varnish
Spar varnish (also called marine varnish) was originally intended for use on ship or boat spars, to protect the timber from the effects of sea and weather. Spars bend under the load of their sails. The primary requirements were water resistance and also elasticity, so as to remain adhering as the spars flexed. Elasticity was a pre-condition for weatherproofing too, as a finish that cracked would then allow water through, even if the remaining film was impermeable. Appearance and gloss was of relatively low value. Modified tung oil and phenolic resins are often used.
When first developed, no varnishes had good UV-resistance. Even after more modern synthetic resins did become resistant, a true spar varnish maintained its elasticity above other virtues, even if this required a compromise in its UV-resistance. Spar varnishes are thus not necessarily the best choice for outdoor woodwork which does not need to bend in service.
Despite this, the widespread perception of "marine products" as "tough" led to domestic outdoor varnishes being branded as "Spar varnish" and sold on the virtue of their weather- and UV-resistance. These claims may be more or less realistic, depending on individual products. Only relatively recently have spar varnishes been available that can offer both effective elasticity and UV-resistance.
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I put polyurethane on a plywood boat hood. Didn't take long for it to screw up. Covered up mostly. When I went to a boat how, the guy told me the wood expansion is not compatible with polyurethane. He told me to use spar varnish.
Greg
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Bought my home 20 years ago with a very badly weathered mahogany entry door, alligatored and looking shabby.
On the outside you need to remove all old varnish by sanding or stripping, plus finish sanding. Next you use a good quality oil based stain in a medium brown. Then you use a spar varnish. I recommend Minwax "Helmsman" Spar Urethane (HD) and apply at least 3 coats. This will give you a very rich looking finish that shows off the grain of the mahogany. I add a new coat every five years. It now looks better than new, after twenty years.
Same treatment for the sill.
On the inside of the door I used "Restor-A-Finish" by Howard Products. It comes in several finishes. It "restores the original color and luster to the finish while blending out minor scratches and blemishes". Also at HD. I used Golden Oak finish. You wipe it on with a rag. Works great.
Your door is definitely worth restoring. Take your time. You will be amazed at the result. Entry doors are very expensive.
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On 12/7/2012 1:46 AM, walter wrote:

I tried spar varnish only once, and found it very thick and difficult to brush out. I've used other varnishes countless times, and spar may be different than what I experienced. The OP seems pretty unfamiliar with wood finishing, so tips need to be made with that in mind. One particular issue is that, regardless of the type of finish chosen, moisture seepage needs to be sealed out. The other, no finish will give good results if weathered wood is not sanded down. Power sanders may be overkill for someone without some experience. Whether regular oil-based varnish or spar varnish are used, surface prep is more important than that choice IMO. Thinning oil-based varnish allows it to sink into wood grain better and gives a smoother finish. Of course, the wood has to be DRY.
In choosing a stain color, it's a good idea to see the wood when it is either wet or some mineral spirits are wiped on...those give a good idea of what a clear finish without stain will do...some woods darken a good deal with just a clear finish. The OP's situation looks to have suffered more from water and wear than from sun.
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Norminn wrote:

I don't think I have ever varnished anything before.

The door will get soaking wet from rain so this is important!

I have a Makita belt sander but I can not imagine using it on this door due to the ins and outs of the molding. I might use it on the sill but even then it might dig a huge hole before I know it. I am ok with hand sanding though.
I suspect I start with the heavy grit. And then down to fine. What is the heavy grit I should start from? Wikipeidia has a list http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandpaper
Does P50 look like a good starting point? And maybe P220 as the final grit on the bare wood?
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On 12/7/2012 9:24 AM, Tony Palermo wrote:

Perhaps a more permanent solution, although a bit more expensive. You have an inherent problem, call it an architectural design flaw.
Construct something to shield the door from direct sunlight and rain, a covered approach.
The sunlight is doing more damage than the rain, it is there every day all day long, the rain is not.
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Leon wrote:

The roofline is tall above the door so I could construct a shade of some sort.
But I would still need to stain, seal, and varnish the door!
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On 12/7/2012 12:56 PM, Tony Palermo wrote:

Yes you would still have to refinish the door however if yo keep the direct sun light off you are also likely to keep a majority of rain the rain off. However it is quite likely that this would be the last time you have to refinish the door. My previous home had a front door that was shaded from direct sun light and most of the rain, it never had to be refinished during the 30 years that I lived there.
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